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1990-1992 
3RADUATE CATALOG 



»40RTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY 

DECEMBER 1989 



^ 



I. 




Above is an aerial view of the central campus of North Carolina 
State University viewed east to west. The strong diagonal in the 
foreground is Hillsborough Street which forms the north border. In 
the lower left is the Memorial Toiver, a prominent landmark which 
commemorates World War 1 dead. 



VOLUME 89 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

(USPS 393-040) 

DECEMBER 1989 



NUMBER 4 



Published weekly by North Carolina Sute University. Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 112 Peele Hall. Box 7103. 
Raleigh. NC 27695-7103. Second class postage paid at Raleigh. NC 27611. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
North Carolina State University. Box 7103. Raleigh. NC 27695-7103. 




North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Graduate Catalog 

1990-92 



i 





CONTENTS 

North Carolina State University 4 

Administration, North Carolina State University 6 

Administration, University of North Carolina 363 

The Calendar 8 

The Graduate School 12 

Graduate Student Association 12 

General Information 13 

Application 13 

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Scores 13 

International Students 14 

Admission 15 

Registration and Records 18 

Tuition and Fees 20 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 25 

Other Financial Aid 28 

Military Education and Training 30 

Health Services 31 

Housing 31 

Graduate Programs 33 

Master's Degrees 35 

Master of Science and Master of Arts 35 

Master's Degree in a Designated Field 39 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees 41 

The D. H. Hill Library 47 

Institutes 47 

Special Laboratories and Facilities 48 

Special Programs 55 

University Patent and Copyright Procedures 56 

Policy on Illegal Drugs 61 

Fields of Instruction 64 

Graduate Faculty 332 

Board of Trustees and Board of Governors 365 

Index 367 

Campus Map 370-371 



4 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

North Carolina State University is a national center for research, teaching and 
extension. As a Land-Grant state university, it shares the distinctive characteris- 
tics of these institutions nationally— broad academic offerings, extensive public 
service, national and international activities, and large-scale extension and 
research programs. 

North Carolina State University is committed to equality of educational oppor- 
tunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students or employees based 
on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age or handicap. Moreover, NCSU is 
open to people of all races and actively seeks to promote racial integration by 
recruiting and enrolling a larger number of black students. 

NCSU's rich and varied academic program is comprised of 96 undergraduate 
degree programs spanning 89 fields of study, 107 master's degree programs 
spanning 77 fields of study, 48 doctoral degree programs and the doctor of 
veterinary medicine program. The University offers approximately 2,900 
courses. 

Research activities span a broad spectrum of about 1 ,400 scientific, technologi- 
cal and scholarly endeavors with a budget of $150 million annually. 

Extension offices in each of the state's 100 counties and on the Cherokee Indian 
reservation assist in carrying the University's teaching and research programs 
throughout the state. The diversity of these programs spans such fields as agri- 
culture, design, education, engineering, forestry, humanities, marine and envir- 
onmental sciences, textiles, veterinary medicine, and the physical, social and life 
sciences. 

The University's annual expenditures reach approximately $425 million, and 
its employees total about 5,600. There are more than 2,950 faculty and profes- 
sional staff, including 1,636 graduate faculty and 257 adjunct faculty. 

NCSU's campus, located just west of the downtown area of Raleigh, totals some 
1,750 acres. This includes the central campus of 623 acres with some 155 build- 
ings, the adjacent Centennial Campus of 938 acres under development, and the 
182-acre College of Veterinary Medicine campus. 

In addition, the University has some 88,000 acres statewide, including one 
research and endowment forest of 78,000 acres. Near the campus are 2,500 acres 
containing research farms; biology and ecology sites; genetics, horticulture and 
floriculture nurseries; teaching and research forests; and Carter-Finley 
Stadium. 

With a total enrollment of more than 25,500, the University has approximately 
17,300 undergraduate students, 3,550 graduate students, 4,100 lifelong educa- 
tion students and 550 students in other special categories. The student population 
consists of approximately 15,600 men and 9,900 women, including 2,380 blacks 
and 888 other minority students. Students come to NCSU from every state in the 
union and at least 91 foreign countries are represented by 1,049 international 
students. 

The University is organized in eight colleges, the School of Design and the 
Graduate School. The eight colleges are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Educa- 
tion and Psychology, Engineering, Forest Resources, Humanities and Social 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 5 

Sciences, Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Textiles, and Veterinary Medi- 
cine. In addition, a complex of divisions and programs provides for a wide range 
of special programs in academic affairs, research and extension. 

North Carolina State University is one of three Research Triangle Universities 
along with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
In the 30-mile triangle formed by the universities is the Research Triangle Park 
which includes the Research Triangle Institute, a not-for-profit, contract 
research organization founded by the three universities. 

NCSU is a member of the National Association of State Universities and 
Land-Grant Colleges. It is also a member of the American Council on Education, 
the College Entrance Examination Board, the Council of Graduate Schools in the 
United States, the National Commission on Accrediting and the Southern Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Schools. 

The University is accredited by national and regional accrediting agencies 
applicable to the University and its numerous professional fields. 

Nondiscrimination Statement 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to equality of opportunity within 
its community. Accordingly, North Carolina State University does not practice 
or condone discrimination, in any form, against students, employees or appli- 
cants on the grounds of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age or handicap. 
North Carolina State University commits itself to positive action to secure equal 
opportunity regardless of those characteristics. 

North Carolina State University supports the protection available to members 
of its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Titles VI and VII 
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 
Sections 799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age 
Discrimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Vietnam Veterans 
Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, and Executive Order 11246. For informa- 
tion concerning these provisions, contact: 

Dr. Lawrence M. Clark 

Associate Provost & Affirmative Action Officer 

201 Holladay Hall 

P. 0. Box 7101 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh North Carolina 27695-7101 

Phone: 919/737-3409 



6 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ADMINISTRATION 

Larry K. Monteith, (Interim) Chancellor 

Nash N. Winstead, Provost and Vice Chancellor 

Debra W. Stewart, Dean of Graduate School 

Franklin D. Hart, Vice Chancellor for Research 

George L. Worsley, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business 

Arthur L. White (Interim), Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

Thomas H. Stafford Jr., Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs 

John T. Kanipe Jr., Vice Chancellor for University Development 

Albert B. Lanier, Jr., Vice Chancellor for University Relations 

Deans of Colleges and Schools 

Durward F. Bateman, Agriculture and Life Sciences 

John T. Regan, Design 

Joan J. Michael, Education and Psychology 

James K. Ferrell, (Interim) Engineering 

Larry W. Tombaugh, Forest Resources 

William B. Toole III, Humanities and Social Sciences 

Jerry L. Whitten, Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

Robert A. Barnhardt, Textiles 

Terrence M. Curtin, Veterinary Medicine 

Graduate School— Administrative Office 

D. W. Stewart, Dean 

E. M. Crawford, Associate Dean 
D. A. Emery, Associate Dean 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Graduate School — Administrative Board 

D. W. Stewart, Dean 

E. M. Crawford, Associate Dean 

D. A. Emery, Associate Dean 

R. D. Bereman. Professor of Chemistry; Associate Dean for 

Academic Affairs, College of Physical and 

Mathematical Sciences 
G. Bizios, Professor of Architecture 
S. E. Elmaghraby, University Professor of Industrial 

Engineering and Operations Research; Director of 

the Operations Research Program 
H. A. Exum, Associate Professor of Counselor 

Education; Associate Dean for Research 

and Graduate Studies, College of Education 

and Psychology 
R. M. Fearn, Professor of Economics and Business 
T. H. Glisson, Professor of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering; Associate Dean for 

Academic Affairs, College of Engineering 
S. P. Hersh, Charles A. Cannon Professor of Textile 

Engineering, Chemistry and Science; Director of 

Graduate Studies, College of Textiles 

E. J. Kamprath, William Neal Reynolds Professor 
of Soil Science 

G. E. Mitchell, Professor of Physics; Associate 

Head of the Department and Graduate Administrator 
R. G. Pearson, Professor of Wood and Paper 

Science and Graduate Administrator 
M. C. Roberts, Professor of Food Animal and Equine 

Medicine 
R. S. Sowell, Professor of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering and Graduate Administrator 
E. S. Vasu. Associate Professor of Curriculum 

and Instruction 



Term Expires 



June, 1990 



August, 1989 
December, 1989 



June, 1991 



April, 1993 
June, 1990 



September, 1992 

June, 1991 
March, 1991 
June, 1991 



December, 1991 
November, 1989 

June, 1991 



8 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

THE CALENDAR 

FALL SEMESTER, 1989 



August 23 
September 4 
September 7 



Wed. 

Mon. 
Thurs. 



September 20 


Wed, 


October 2 


Fri. 


October 4 


Wed, 


October 13 


Fri. 


October 18 


Wed. 


October 27 


Fri. 


November 10 


Fri. 



November 21 


Tues. 


November 27 


Mon. 


December 8 


Fri. 


December 11-16 


Mon.-Sat. 


December 18-19 


Mon. -Tues, 


SPRING SEMESTER, 1990 


January 10 


Wed. 


January 15 


Mon. 


January 25 


Thurs. 



February 8 

February 21 
March 2 
March 12 
March 16 



Thurs. 

Wed. 
Fri. 
Mon. 
Fri. 



First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to register or to add a course; last day 
to withdraw or drop a course with a refund. 
(The tuition and fees charge is based on the 
official number of hours and courses carried 
at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) 
Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 
400 level or below without a grade. 
Academic Difficulties Reports due. 
Honors Convocation (no classes until 12:00 
noon). 

Fall vacation begins at 1:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 
500 or 600 level without a grade. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School, in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees, by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in December, 1989. Last 
day for unconditional pass on final oral exam- 
inations by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Thanksgiving vacation begins at 1:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 
Final examinations. 



First day of classes. 

Holiday 

Last day to register or to add a course; last day 

to withdraw or drop a course with a refund. 

(The tuition and fees charge is based on the 

official number of hours and courses carried 

at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 

400 level or below without a grade. 

Academic Difficulties Reports due. 

Spring vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 

500 or 600 level without a grade. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



March 30 



Fri. 



April 13 


Fri. 


April 27 


Fri. 


April 30-May 5 


Mon.-Sat. 


May 7-8 


Mon.-Tues. 


May 12 


Sat. 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1990 

First Session 



May 22 
May 28 



Tues. 
Mon. 



June 1 


Fri. 


June 8 


Fri. 


June 22 
June 25-26 


Fri. 
Mon.-Tues, 


Second Session 




July 2 
July 4 
July 6 


Mon. 
Wed. 
Fri. 



July 9 

July 13 
July 20 



Mon. 

Fri. 
Fri. 



Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School, in final form as approved by 
advisory committees, by candidates for mas- 
ter's and doctoral degrees in May, 1990. Last 
day for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 
Holiday 

Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 
Final examinations. 
Commencement. 



First day of classes. 

Last day to register or to add a course; last day 

to withdraw of drop a course with a refund. 

(The tuition and fees charge is based on the 

official number of hours and courses carried 

at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 

400 level or below without a grade. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 

500 or 600 level without a grade. 

Last day of classes. 

Final examinations. 



First day of classes. 
Holiday 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School, in final form as approved by 
advisory committees, by candidates for mas- 
ter's and doctoral degrees in August, 1990. Last 
day for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Last day to register or to add a course; last day 
to withdraw or drop a course with a refund. 
(The tuition and fees charge is based on the 
official number of hours and courses carried 
at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) 
Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 
400 level or below without a grade. 
Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 
500 or 600 level without a grade. 



10 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



August 3 
August 6-7 


Fri. 

Mon.-Tues, 


FALL SEMESTER, 1990 


August 22 
September 3 
September 10 


Wed. 

Mon. 
Mon. 



September 24 


Mon. 


October 3 


Wed, 


October 5 


Fri. 


October 12 


Fri. 


October 17 


Wed. 


October 26 


Fri. 


November 9 


Fri. 



November 21 


Wed. 


November 26 


Mon. 


December 7 


Fri. 


December 10-15 


Mon.-Sat. 


December 17-18 


Mon.-Tues. 


SPRING SEMESTER, 1991 


January 9 


Wed. 


January 21 


Mon, 


March 1 


Fri. 


March 11 


Mon. 


March 28 


Thurs. 



March 29 
April 26 
April 29-May 3 



Fri. 
Fri. 
Mon.-Sat. 



Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to register or to add a course; last day 
to withdraw or drop a course with a refund. 
(The tuition and fees charge is based on the 
official number of hours and courses carried 
at 5:00 p.m. on this day.) 
Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 
400 level or below without a grade. 
Honors Convocation (no classes until 12:00 
noon) 

Academic Difficulties Reports due. 
Fall vacation begins at 1:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 
500 or 600 level without a grade. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School, in final form as approved by 
advisory committees, by candidates for mas- 
ter's and doctoral degrees in December, 1990. 
Last day for unconditional pass on final oral 
examinations by candidates for master's de- 
grees not requiring theses. 
Thanksgiving vacation begins at 1:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 
Final examinations. 



First day of classes. 
Holiday 

Spring vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 
Classes resume at 7:50 a.m. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Gradu- 
ate School, in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees, by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in May, 1991. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 
Holiday. 

Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



11 



May 6-7 
May 11 



Mon.-Tues. 
Sat. 



Final examinations. 
Commencement. 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1991 

First Session 



May 21 
June 21 
June 24-25 


Tues. 

Fri. 

Mon.-Tues, 


Second Session 




Julyl 
July 4 
Julys 


Mon. 

Thurs. 

Fri. 



August 2 
August 5-6 



Fri. 
Mon.-Tues. 



First day of classes. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Gradu- 
ate School, in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees, by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in August, 1991. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tion by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



NOTE: This calendar is subject to periodic review and revision. 




12 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Graduate School 

Graduate instruction was first offered at North Carolina State University in 
1893, and the first doctoral degree was conferred in 1926. In the ensuing years, 
the Graduate School has grown steadily and now provides instruction and facili- 
ties for advanced study and research in the fields of agriculture and life sciences, 
design, education, engineering, forest resources, humanities and social sciences, 
physical and mathematical sciences, textiles and veterinary medicine. In 1988- 
89, the University granted 203 Doctor of Philosophy degrees, 29 Doctor of Educa- 
tion degrees and 639 master's degrees. 

The Graduate School is currently composed of more than 1,700 graduate 
faculty members. Educated at major universities throughout the world and 
established both in advanced teaching and research, these scholars guide the 
University's more than 3,800 master's and doctoral students from all areas of the 
United States and some 91 other countries. 

The faculty and students have available exceptional facilities, including librar- 
ies, laboratories, modern equipment and special research areas. Additionally, a 
cooperative agreement exists among the Graduate Schools of the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 
Duke University and North Carolina State University which increases the edu- 
cational and research possibilities associated with each. 



Graduate Student Association 

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) is an academic, political and social 
organization composed of all graduate students and governed by duly elected 
officials and representatives from the departmental graduate student chapters. 
It is officially recognized by the university as the voice of the graduate students. 
The GSA President has full voting membership on the Graduate School Adminis- 
trative Board. 

Among the services that the GSA sponsors, one of its most viable academic 
programs is the Travel Fund. Through this fund graduate students may obtain 
funds to present original research work at professional meetings. The GSA also 
sponsors, along with the Alumni Association and the Academy of Outstanding 
Teachers, an annual awards ceremony to honor those teaching assistants of 
outstanding merit. In addition, the GSA, through its standing committees, spon- 
sors various social events and provides support for departmental GSA chapters. 

Generally, the GSA can provide assistance on most questions concerning grad- 
uate student life. Graduate students may contact GSA via their departmental 
representative or via the president of the Association whose telephone number 
can be obtained through the Graduate School. All graduate students are also 
invited to participate in the business meetings which are usually held on the last 
Monday of each month. Contact departmental representatives for time and place. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 13 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Application 

Applications for admission must be accompanied by the following: two official 
transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended, references 
from at least three people who know of the student's academic record and poten- 
tial for graduate study, a non-refundable application fee of $35 and, in most cases, 
an official statement of the student's Graduate Record Examination scores. 
Application and reference forms may be obtained by writing or visiting the Dean 
of the Graduate School, 104 Peele Hall, Box 7102, North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, Raleigh, N. C. 27695-7102. When completed, all application materials 
should be returned according to instructions. Application is made for a specific 
degree program and date of enrollment (see "Admission"). 

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Scores 

The following departments and programs will not act on applications unless 
accompanied by GRE scores for at least the GRE General (Aptitude) Test (verbal 
and quantitative): 

*Adult and Community College Education 
*Agricultural Education 

Aerospace Engineering 

Animal Science 

Biochemistry 

Biomathematics 

Botany 

Chemical Engineering 

Computer Engineering 

Crop Science 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Ecology 
*Educational Administration and Supervision 

Electrical Engineering 

English 

Entomology 

Food Science 

Forestry 

Genetics 

Guidance and Personnel Services 

History 

Horticultural Science 
*Industrial Arts Education 

Industrial Engineering 

International Development 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

Mathematics 

*These programs require either the GRE or Miller Analogies (the Mathematics and Science Education programs 
require both for doctoral). 



14 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

*Mathematics Education 

Mechanical Engineering 

Microbiology 
Nutrition 
*Occupational Education 

Physiology 

Plant Pathology 

Political Science 

Product Design 
**Psychology 

Public Affairs 

Recreation Resources Administration 

Rural Sociology 
*Science Education 

Sociology 
*Special Education 

Statistics 

Toxicology 
*Vocational Industrial Education 

Wildlife Biology 
***Zoology 

Many departments, although not normally requiring GRE scores, may in 
special instances require their submission as additional information to be used in 
making a judgment of the student's potential for success in a graduate program. 
Information regarding the GRE and registration forms may be obtained from 
the Educational Testing Service, Box 6000, Princeton, NJ 08541-6000. 

*These programs require either the GRE or Miller Analogies (the Mathematics and Science Education programs 
require both for doctoral). 

**Psychology requires the Subject (Advanced) Test and Miller Analogies as well. 
***The Zoology program requires the GRE General and Advanced Test. 

International Students 

Students whose native language is other than English, regardless of citizen- 
ship, must submit TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) scores as 
evidence of ability to use English at a level of competence sufficient for graduate 
work. The minimum requirement for admission is a TOEFL score of 550, with 
scores of 50 on at least two of the sections and no section score below 45. (Minimum 
score subject to change; departments may establish a higher minimum require- 
ment.) The test date must be within 24 months of the application deadline date 
before the semester for which the application is being reviewed. An official score 
report issued by the Educational Testing Service is required. All international 
students must be cleared by the Department of Foreign Languages and Litera- 
tures during the first two weeks of their initial semester in residence and may be 
required to take additional course work in English. In addition, the international 
applicant must provide the University with verification that the required funds 
are available to support the proposed program of advanced study. Foreign 
nationals in the United States at the time application is made must also provide 
information regarding their current visa status. The University provides special 
forms to be used by the applicant in supplying this information. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 15 



Admission 



The procedures followed in evaluating an applicant's potential for success in 
graduate work and the criteria used for admissions decisions vary according to 
departments and colleges/schools and reflect an evaluation of the applicant's 
potential to engage in graduate work and the capability of the individual 
departments to accommodate additional students. Most departments consider 
applications as they arrive, while others accumulate applications and make 
recommendations on admission at certain times during the year. Generally, 
requests for admission are considered by departmental admissions committees 
which forward the departmental recommendations to the Dean of the Graduate 
School. 

Students are admitted to full or provisional status in a specific degree pro- 
gram. Admission is granted for a specific semester or summer term. Any change 
in the admission date must be requested in writing and approved by the depart- 
ment and Graduate School. Once the requirements for that degree program have 
been completed, no further registration as a graduate student will be permitted 
unless admission to a new graduate classification has been formally approved. 
Students with special objectives may request admission in the "Graduate-Un- 
classified Status" (see below) or register in the "Post-Baccalaureate Studies" 
program (see next page) through the Division of Lifelong Education. 

FULL GRADUATE STANDING 

To be considered for admission in full graduate standing, an applicant must 
have a baccalaureate degree from a college or university recognized as standard 
by a regional or general accrediting agency and must have at least a "B" average 
in the undergraduate major or in the latest graduate degree program. 

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 

1. Provisional admission may be granted to applicants with bachelor's degrees 
from accredited institutions who lack undergraduate work considered essential 
for graduate study in a major field. Course work, without graduate credit, will be 
required to make up such deficiencies before admission to full status can be 
granted. 

Applicants with bachelor's degrees from nonaccredited institutions may be 
granted provisional admission when their academic records warrant this status. 
Additional course work will be required of such students when deficiencies in 
previous training are apparent. 

Full graduate standing is granted when the deficiencies responsible for the 
provisional status are corrected, provided the student has maintained a satisfac- 
tory academic record (3.0 Grade Point Average) on all course work taken in a 
graduate classification. A change from provisional status to full graduate stand- 
ing is effected only upon the recommendation of the department in which the 
student is seeking the degree. 

2. Students with bachelor's degrees from accredited institutions whose scho- 
lastic records are below the standards for admission to full graduate standing 
may be admitted provisionally when unavoidable, extenuating circumstances 
affected their undergraduate averages or when progressive improvement in 
their undergraduate work warrants provisional admission. Students admitted 
provisionally under these circumstances will have their status changed to full 



16 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

graduate standing after completion of nine or more graduate credit hours follow- 
ing admission provided the student has maintained at least a "B" average. 

A graduate student is not eligible for appointment to an assistantship or 
fellowship while on provisional status. 

GRADUATE-UNCLASSIFIED STATUS 

The Graduate-Unclassified status is a temporary classification and students 
admitted to this status are not candidates for degrees. They may take courses for 
graduate credit but may not apply more than 10 credits earned while in this 
status to any program leading to an advanced degree at this institution. Unclassi- 
fied graduate students are expected to meet the same admissions requirements 
that apply to graduate students in full standing. Any individual having an 
interest in applying for admission as a Graduate-Unclassified Student should 
correspond with the Graduate Dean describing his or her particular interests 
and objectives prior to making application. 

POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDIES (PBS) 

The Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) classification is designed for U. S. 
citizens who wish to undertake academic work beyond the baccalaureate degree 
but who are not currently admitted to a degree program. This classification is not 
open to international students with the exception of the spouse of a regularly 
enrolled NCSU student. In special cases where students are sponsored by an 
agency of the U. S. government for specialized, non-degree study, approval may 
be given by the Graduate School for registration in the Post-Baccalaureate 
Studies classification. The following policies apply to students who wish to regis- 
ter for PBS: 

1. All must have baccalaureate degrees from accredited institutions of higher 
education. 

2. All classes taken for credit by PBS students will be graded in the usual 
manner that applies for the particular course (A,B,C,D,NC or S,U). All 
courses taken at NCSU will show on the student's transcript. If the student 
is admitted as a graduate student, a maximum of nine hours may apply 
toward the minimum requirements of the degree for which the student is 
enrolled, including hours approved for graduate credit while classified as a 
senior, unclassified undergraduate or professional engineering student. 
Only the first nine hours of course work taken at the graduate level in the 
PBS category can be accepted toward degree requirements unless a 
request for some other combination of nine hours is made by the student's 
advisory committee and approved both by the College or School Dean and 
the Graduate Dean. 

3. The grade point average (GPA) of a graduate student who has credits in the 
PBS category will be based on all courses taken at the 400-600 level. 
However, no course taken six (6) years prior to enrollment into a program 
will be considered in the GPA calculation. 

4. Registration is limited to a maximum of two courses per semester. Individ- 
uals who are employed full-time should limit their PBS registrations to one 
course per semester. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 17 

5. The PBS classification carries with it no implication that the student will 
be admitted to the Graduate School in any degree classification. 

6. All course work accepted for degree credit must be approved by the stu- 
dent's advisory committee as being germane to the program. Requests for 
degree credit for courses completed in the PBS classification are con- 
sidered after admission to a graduate degree program when the student's 
Plan of Graduate Work is filed with the Graduate School. 

7. PBS students are expected to familiarize themselves with Graduate School 
policies and to seek further advice or clarification as needed. 

Grades of all courses taken after the first nine hours will be recorded on PBS 
students' transcripts. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

Professional degree students are admitted as undergraduate students, are 
classified as "PR" students and are subject to rules and regulations as established 
and administered by the Dean of the College of Engineering. 

A professional degree student who is subsequently admitted to the Graduate 
School may, with the approval of the master's advisory committee, the major 
department and the Graduate School receive graduate credit for a maximum of 
nine hours credit for courses in which a grade of "B" or higher was received. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Cooperative Education Program is designed to be an integral part of a 
graduate student's educational program and is available to all majors. The 
program is designed to complement classroom learning by providing sponsored, 
paid work assignments in industry, business, and government. The work expe- 
rience is selected in terms of its relationship to a student's major and/or career 
goals and provides for full-time work on alternating semesters or part-time work 
on a parallel plan while carrying a reduced load of courses. Co-op participation 
does not constitute an interruption of college work. Co-op work assignments have 
been approved and are monitored by the program staff. 

To be eligible for the Co-op Program, graduate students must have completed 
one semester of graduate study, be in good academic standing, have the approval 
of their graduate advisers, and have an interview with the Director of Coopera- 
tive Education. For program completion, graduate students must work a min- 
imum of one fall or spring semester full-time or two semesters part-time. How- 
ever, most employers look for an increased level of productivity on the part of the 
student and, therefore, expect the graduate student to plan on additional work 
semesters. 

International students also qualify for the Co-op Program provided they meet 
visa regulations on curricular practical training. 

For further information, contact William D. Weston, Director of Cooperative 
Education, Box 7110, 737-2199. 

COOPERATING RALEIGH COLLEGES 

The Cooperating Raleigh Colleges (CRC) is a voluntary organization com- 
prised of North Carolina State University, Meredith College, Peace College, St. 
Augustine's College, St. Mary's College and Shaw University. Graduate pro- 



18 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

grams are currently offered only at NCSU and Meredith College, but the organi- 
zation provides the opportunity for graduate students to enroll at either institu- 
tion for a course or courses not offered on their home campus. 

Any NCSU graduate degree student who is enrolled in at least three graduate 
credit hours on the NCSU campus may take a course at Meredith College during 
the fall or spring semester, provided that (a) the course is not taught on the NCSU 
campus and (b) the advisory committee considers the course educationally 
desirable. 

NCSU students may not register for more than a total of two courses in any 
semester at Meredith, and no more than six of the required academic credits for a 
master's degree at NCSU may be accepted from that institution. Grades from 
Meredith are not used in computing a student's NCSU grade point average. 

Under this agreement, regular tuition and fees are paid to NCSU. Certain 
special fees may be required for specific courses at Meredith, and the student is 
responsible for paying these fees. 

Certificate Renewal 

Public school personnel who are primarily interested in "certification credit" 
may enroll in the PBS program through the Division of Lifelong Education 
without forwarding transcripts of previous work to the Graduate School. In such 
cases, the College of Education and Psychology will be responsible for assessing 
the adequacy of the applicant's qualifications for enrollment in the course(s) 
concerned. 

Registration and Records 

The Office of Registration and Records must have authorization from the Dean 
of the Graduate School before a graduate student in any classification will be 
permitted to register for classes. This authorization will be sent to the Office of 
Registration and Records at the time the student is notified of acceptance for 
graduate study. All students attending classes must be registered for credit or 
audit. Grade records are furnished the students at the end of each scheduled 
school term. 

MEDICAL HISTORY AND IMMUNIZATION RECORDS 

All graduate students admitted to a degree program are required by State law 
to submit a report of medical history and immunization documentation prior to 
completing their initial registration. This report must document immunization 
against tetanus, measles, German measles and polio. NCSU students returning 
to Graduate School must have their medical history on file updated. The required 
reports should be received in the Student Health Service at least thirty days 
before registration. 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION 

North Carolina State University participates in an Interinstitutional Registra- 
tion program with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Greensboro and Duke University. Under this 
agreement, graduate students enrolled at this university may undertake course 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 19 

work on these campuses upon the recommendation of their advisory committees. 
Courses offered by North Carolina A&T University and by the University of 
North Carolina at Charlotte over the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina 
communications system are also available through Interinstitutional Registra- 
tion. 

Even though taking a course on another campus, the graduate student is 
exclusively under the administrative direction of the North Carolina State Uni- 
versity Graduate School. Enrollment for courses on other campuses will take 
place on this campus, using special forms obtained from the Office of Registra- 
tion and Records. The Graduate School shall consider courses taken on other 
campuses as a part of the student's normal load, and the billing for such work will 
be through the Office of Finance and Business. The procedures followed in the 
summer sessions are somewhat different; detailed instructions are available in 
the Office of Registration and Records. 

When the grading system on the campus being visited is different from the 
North Carolina State University system, grades received under Interinstitu- 
tional Registration will be converted to the North Carolina State University 
system. "H," "P," "L" and "F" grades earned at the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill and "E," "G," "S" and "F" grades earned at Duke University will be 
converted to "A," "B," "C" and "NC" grades, respectively. 

COURSE LOAD 

A full-time graduate course load is 9 to 15 credits per semester (including 
audits) and 6 credits per summer session (including audits). Audits in subjects in 
which the student has no previous experience will be evaluated at full credit 
value in determining course load. Audits taken as repetition of work previously 
accomplished are considered atone half of their value in calculating course loads. 
With the single exception of foreign language audits, all audit registrations must 
fall within the range of maximum permissible course loads. 

Foreign students on F-1 and J-1 visas are required by the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service to carry a full-time course of study to remain in status. 

Graduate students holding assistantships are restricted to the following maxi- 
mum semester course loads: full time, 3 hours; three-quarters time, 6 hours; 
one-half time, 9 hours; one-quarter time, 12 hours. External employment obliga- 
tions of students on assistantships plus their assistantship obligations should not 
exceed these limits. Additionally, graduate assistants are limited to the following 
maximum totals of credit hours over the duration of their appointments: 



Full time 

Full time 

%l 

'At 

'At 

Vzt 

VA 

%t 



me 
me 
me 
me 
me 
me 



I of Appointjnent 


Maximum Credit Hours 


9 months 


6 


12 months 


9 


9 months 


12 


12 months 


16 


9 months 


18 


12 months 


24 


9 months 


24 


12 months 


30 



20 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SENIORS 

A member of the senior class may, with prior approval of the Dean of the 
Graduate School, register for graduate credit in courses at the 400 and 500 levels 
as long as the combined graduate and undergraduate credit load is not more than 
15 hours. Seniors with an accumulated grade point average of 3.2 or better in 
their major may enroll for a combined graduate and undergraduate credit load of 
18 hours upon the recommendation of the student's advisor and approval by the 
department and the Graduate School. No more than six hours of graduate credit 
may be accumulated by a senior, and those graduate credits may not be applied 
toward the requirements for a baccalaureate degree. Courses at the 600 level are 
not ordinarily open to undergraduates, although occasional exceptions are made 
for senior honor students. 

Seniors desiring to take courses for graduate credit should contact their major 
advisers who will forward appropriate requests to the Graduate Dean for 
approval. 

AUDITS 

Students wishing to audit courses must have the approval of their advisers and 
of the instructors teaching the courses. While auditors receive no course credit, 
they are expected to attend class regularly. The degree to which auditors must 
participate in class beyond regular attendance is optional with the instructors; 
any such requirements should be clearly explained to the auditors in writing at 
the beginning of the semester. An instructor who feels that an auditor has failed 
to fulfill the stipulated requirements is justified in marking "NR" (no recognition 
given for audit) on the grade report roll. 

GRADUATION 

There are three official graduations for graduate students per year, occurring 
at the end of the fall and spring semesters and at the end of the second summer 
session. Formal commencement exercises are held only at the end of spring 
semester, but any student who graduated the preceding second summer session 
or fall semester is eligible to participate if he or she notifies the Graduate School 
in writing of such an intent at least four weeks in advance of the actual com- 
mencement date. Conversely, any student scheduled to graduate in the spring 
semester is required to attend commencement unless he or she has notified the 
Graduate School in writing of the desire to have the degree conferred in absentia. 

The diplomas for those students graduating at the end of second summer 
session or fall semester and those receiving permission to receive the degree in 
absentia are mailed by the Office of Registration and Records which is also 
responsible for the ordering of diplomas. 

Tuition and Fees 

A statement of tuition and fees is mailed to each preregistered student approx- 
imately five weeks before the beginning of any term. The statement must be 
returned with full payment or complete financial assistance information by the 
due date appearing on the statement. Normally the due date is approximately 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 21 

two weeks before classes begin. Non-preregistered students are required to pay 
their tuition and fees at registration. 

All students are responsible for tuition appropriate to their residence status 
unless payment is specifically provided by the terms of a fellowship, traineeship 
or assistantship. 



SEMESTER RATE SCHEDULE-1989-90 ACADEMIC YEAR 

RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA* NONRESIDENTS** 

Tuition and Tuition and 

Horns Fees Fees 

0-Thesis $150 $ 470 

0-2 150 712 

3-5 225 1,351 

6-8 225 2,064 

9+ 525 2,776 



SUMMER SESSION RATE SCHEDULE-1990 

RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA NONRESIDENTS 

Tuition and Tuition and 

Hours Fees Fees 

0-Thesis $150 $ 470 

0-2 150 712 

3-5 225 1,351 

6-8 301 1,989 

9+ 376 2,627 

SPECIAL REGISTRATION AND FEES-1989-90 ACADEMIC YEAR 

***Summer Research [GR 596S (master's candidates) or GR 696S (doctoral 
candidates)] 

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work 
during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research. 



•For definition of in-state and out-of-state rates, see pp. 23-25. 
**Under certain conditions, nonresident students who have been offered an assistantship, traineeship or fellowship may 

be eligible for reduced tuition rates. 
**Assessed the 0-Thesis rate. 



22 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

***Thesis Preparation Only [GR 598 (master's candidates) or GR 698 (doctoral 
candidates}] 

For graduate students who have completed all course work, research and 
residence requirements and who are writing a thesis or dissertation. 

*** Dissertation Research [GR 697 (doctoral candidates)] 

For doctoral students who have scheduled no formal course work during a 
given term, who have passed the preliminary examinations, who have com- 
pleted at least six hours of departmental research on the doctoral program and 
who are devoting full time to the dissertation. Students so registered are 
full-time; the course carries no credit hour designation. 

Audits 

During semester when registered and One audit free, each additional 

paying for other course work audit same cost as for credit 

During semester when not registered 

for other course work Same cost as for credit 

During any summer session Same cost as for credit 

Full-time Faculty or Staff $ 7 

Microfilming Doctoral Dissertation $47 

Office of International Visitors 

A special administrative management fee of $250 per semester and $150 per 
summer session is required from a contracting agency sponsoring international 
students who are programmed and advised by the University's Office of Interna- 
tional Visitors. 

(ALL CHARGES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE) 



FULL-TIME FACULTY AND EMPLOYEES 

Full-time faculty of instructor rank and above and other full-time employees of 
the University who hold membership in the Teachers' and State Employees' 
Retirement System may register for credit or as auditors with free tuition 
privileges for one course in any academic term at any campus of the University of 



•Assessed the 0-Thesis rate. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 23 

North Carolina. Free tuition privileges do not apply during the summer. Each 
applicant for free tuition must submit through regular channels a form provided 
by the University. 

REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES 

A student who officially withdraws from school during the first two weeks of a 
semester or by the end of the fourth day of a summer session will receive a tuition 
and fees refund of the full amount paid less a registration fee. The withheld fee 
amounts to $15 the first week and $25 the second week. After the two-week 
period, no refund will be made. 

In some instances, circumstances justify the waiving of rules regarding 
refunds. An example might be withdrawal because of sickness. Students have the 
privilege of appeal to the Fee Appeals Committee when they feel special consid- 
eration is merited. Applications for such appeals may be obtained from the 
University Cashier and Student Accounts Office, 1101 Student Services Center. 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

The basis for determining the appropriate tuition charge rests upon whether a 
student is a resident or a nonresident for tuition purposes. Each student must 
make a statement as to the length of his or her residence in North Carolina with 
assessment by the institution of that statement to be conditioned by the following: 

Residence — To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must become 
a legal resident and remain a legal resident for at least twelve months imme- 
diately prior to classification. Thus, there is a distinction between legal residence 
and residence for tuition purposes. Furthermore, twelve months' legal residence 
means more than simple abode in North Carolina. In particular, it means main- 
taining a domicile (permanent home of indefinite duration) as opposed to "main- 
taining a mere temporary residence or abode incident to enrollment in an institu- 
tion of higher education." The burden of establishing facts which justify 
classification of a student as a resident entitled to in-state tuition rates is on the 
applicant for each classification, who must show his or her entitlement by the 
preponderance (the greater part) of the residentiary information. 

Initiative— Being classified a resident for tuition purposes is contingent on the 
student's seeking such status and providing all information that the institution 
may require in making the determination. 

Parents' Domicile— liaiTi individual, irrespective of age, has living parent(s) or 
court-appointed guardian of the person, the domicile of such parent(s) or 
guardian is, prima facie, the domicile of the individual; but this prima facie 
evidence of the individual's domicile may or may not be sustained by other 
information. Further, nondomiciliary status of parents is not deemed prima facie 
evidence of the applicant child's status if the applicant has lived (though not 
necessarily legally resided) in North Carolina for the five years preceding enroll- 
ment or re-registration. 



24 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Effect of Marriage— Ma-rriage alone does not prevent a person from becoming 
or continuing to be a resident for tuition purposes, nor does marriage in any 
circumstance insure that a person will become or continue to be a resident for 
tuition purposes. Marriage and the legal residence of one's spouse are, however, 
relevant information in determining residentiary intent. Furthermore, if both a 
husband and his wife are legal residents of North Carolina and if one of them has 
been a legal resident longer than the other, then the longer duration may be 
claimed by either spouse in meeting the twelve-month requirement for in-state 
tuition status. 

Military Personnel— A North Carolinian who serves outside the State in the 
armed forces does not lose North Carolina domicile simply by reason of such 
service. Students from the military may prove retention or establishment of 
residence by reference, as in other cases, to residentiary acts accompanied by 
residentiary intent. 

In addition, a separate North Carolina statute affords tuition rate benefits to 
certain military personnel and their dependents even though not qualifying for 
the in-state tuition rate by reason of twelve months legal residence in North 
Carolina. Members of the armed services, while stationed in and concurrently 
living in North Carolina, may be charged a tuition rate lower than the out-of-state 
tuition rate to the extent that the total of entitlements for applicable tuition costs 
available from the federal government, plus certain amounts based under a 
statutory formula upon the in-state tuition rate, is a sum less than the out-of-state 
tuition rate for the pertinent enrollment. A dependent relative of a service 
member stationed in North Carolina is eligible to be charged the in-state tuition 
rate while the dependent relative is living in North Carolina with the service 
member and if the dependent relative has met any requirement of the Selective 
Service System applicable to the dependent relative. These tuition benefits may 
be enjoyed only if the applicable requirements for admission have been met; these 
benefits alone do not provide the basis for receiving those derivative benefits 
under the provisions of the residence classification statute reviewed elsewhere in 
this summary. 

Grace Period— U a person (1) has been a bona fide legal resident, (2) has 
consequently been classified a resident for tuition purposes and (3) has subse- 
quently lost North Carolina legal residence while enrolled at a public institution 
of higher education, that person may continue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate for 
a grace period of twelve months measured from the date on which North Carolina 
legal residence was lost. If the twelve months end during an academic term for 
which the person is enrolled at a State institution of higher education, the grace 
period extends, in addition, to the end of that term. The fact of marriage to one 
who continues domiciled outside North Carolina does not by itself cause loss of 
legal residence, marking the beginning of the grace period. 

Minors — Minors (persons under 18 years of age) usually have the domicile of 
their parents, but certain special cases are recognized by the residence classifica- 
tion statute in determining residence for tuition purposes. 

(a) If a minor's parents live apart, the minor's domicile is deemed to be North 
Carolina for the time period(s) that either parent, as a North Carolina legal 
resident, may claim and does claim the minor as a tax dependent, even if other 
law or judicial act assigns the minor's domicile outside North Carolina. A minor 
thus deemed to be a legal resident will not, upon achieving majority before 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 25 

enrolling at an institution of higher education, lose North Carolina legal resi- 
dence if that person (1) upon becoming an adult "acts, to the extent that the 
person's degree of actual emancipation permits, in a manner consistent with bona 
fide legal residence in North Carolina" and (2) "begins enrollment at an institu- 
tion of higher education not later than the fall academic term next following 
completion of education prerequisite to admission at such institution." 

(b) If a Minor has lived for five or more consecutive years with relatives (other 
than parents) who are domiciled in North Carolina and if the relatives have 
functioned during this time as if they were personal guardians, the minor will be 
deemed a resident for tuition purposes for an enrolled term commencing imme- 
diately after at least five years in which these circumstances have existed. If 
under this consideration a minor is deemed to be a resident for tuition purposes 
immediately prior to his or her eighteenth birthday, that person on achieving 
majority will be deemed a legal resident of North Carolina of at least 12 months' 
duration. This provision acts to confer in-state tuition status even in the face of 
other provisions of law to the contrary; however, a person deemed a resident of 12 
months' duration pursuant to this provision continues to be a legal resident of the 
State only so long as he or she does not abandon North Carolina domicile. 

Lost but Regained Domicile— If a student ceases enrollment at or graduates 
from an institution of higher education while classified a resident for tuition 
purposes and then both abandons and reacquires North Carolina domicile within 
a 12-month period, that person, if he or she continues to maintain the reacquired 
domicile into re-enrollment at an institution of higher education, may re-enroll at 
the in-state tuition rate without having to meet the usual 12-month durational 
requirement. However, any one person may receive the benefit of this provision 
only once. 

Change of Status — A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution (or 
permitted to re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program which 
involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment) must be classified by the admit- 
ting institution either as a resident or as a non-resident for tuition purposes prior 
to actual enrollment. A residence status classification once assigned (and final- 
ized pursuant to any appeal properly taken) may be changed thereafter (with 
corresponding change in billing rates) only at intervals corresponding with the 
established primary divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students— When a student transfers from one North Carolina public 
institution of higher education to another, he or she is treated as a new student by 
the institution to which he or she is transferring and must be assigned an initial 
residence status classification for tuition purposes. 

Prevailing North Carolina Latt;— General Statute (G.S.) 116-143.1 is the pre- 
vailing statute governing residence status classification. Copies of the applicable 
law and/or implementing regulations are available for inspection in the Office of 
Undergraduate Admissions, 112 Peele Hall. 

To initiate a review of a residence status classification, a student must submit a 
Residence-and-Tuition Status Application to the Graduate School office, 104 
Peele Hall. Questions about residency should be directed to that office. 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate students may receive financial support through fellowships, trainee- 
ships and teaching or research assistantships sponsored by federal, state and 



26 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

private agencies. Prospective students may request consideration for financial 
assistance by completing the appropriate sections of the admissions application 
form. Applicants for these awards should correspond directly with the depart- 
ment of major interest concerning the availability of awards and related infor- 
mation. Enrolled students should contact the major department. Prospective and 
enrolled graduate students are encouraged to apply for national, regional and 
foundation fellowships in addition to awards sponsored through the University. 

RESEARCH AND TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIPS 

The University offers approximately 1,760 assistantships each year. Stipend 
rates for teaching and research assistantships are competitive with other univer- 
sities. For further information on the availability of assistantships, applicants 
should contact the program area of interest. 

Unless tuition is expressly provided by the terms of the award, an award 
recipient must pay tuition at the rate determined by his or her residence status. 
However, a nonresident graduate student awarded an assistantship or a fellow- 
ship may be eligible for a reduced tuition rate comparable to the in-state rate. 
Further information may be obtained by contacting the department of major 
interest. 

A graduate student must be in good academic standing (B or better average) to 
be eligible for appointment to an assistantship, fellowship or traineeship and 
must be registered in each semester in which the appointment is in effect. This 
also means that if an assistantship holder covered by tuition remission terminates 
his/her studies after the last day to withdraw from the University or to drop a 
course with a refund (approximately seven days after classes commence), that 
student will be responsible for the prorated part of tuition and fees. 

DEPARTMENTAL FELLOWSHIPS 

Several departments offer fellowships funded from private sources. Students 
are nominated for these fellowships by their departments or programs with 
selection being made by faculty committees or by the Graduate School. For 
additional information concerning such fellowships, the applicant should contact 
the appropriate college, department or program. Examples of such fellowships 
are listed below: 

PHY TrainingGrant, USDA National Needs Fellowship, Biotechnology 
Fellowship and Purina Mills Research Fellowship, all through the College 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences; Dairyman Inc. Fellowship in the 
Department of Animal Science; Pioneer Hybred International in the 
Department of Crop Science; Chemical Industries Institute for Toxicology 
through the Toxicology Program; Fellowship through the Department of 
Plant Pathology; E. G. Moss and R. J. Reynolds Fellowships through the 
N. C. Agricultural Research Service in the College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences; Harkema Fellowship in the Department of Zoology; NASA 
Traineeship, Eastman Scholarship and ARO Fellowships in the Depart- 
ment of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Nuclear Energy Fellow- 
ship, Fusion Technology Fellowship and Murray Fellowship through the 
Department of Nuclear Engineering; Dupont Manufacturing Systems Fel- 
lowship through the Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 27 

Institute; Kimley-Horm Graduate Scholarship and Carolina Asphalt Asso- 
ciation, Inc., through the Department of Civil Engineering; ECE Levels I, 
II and III Supplementary Fellowships, IBM Graduate Fellowship (solid 
state-electronics), IBM Graduate Fellowship in Manufacturing Research, 
IBM Graduate Fellowship in Computer Networking and Dupont Graduate 
Fellowships through the Department of Electrical and Computer Engi- 
neering; Dupont Fellowship in Chemical Engineering, Phillips Graduate 
Fellowship. Southeastern Regional and PIA Supplemental Fellowship in 
the Department of Chemical Engineering; Dean's Fellowships, Microelec- 
tronics Center of N.C. and National Consortium for Minorities in Engineer- 
ing (GEM), all through the College of Engineering; SOHIO Fellowship in 
the Department of Physics; Gertrude M. Cox Fellowship in the Department 
of Statistics; Mary Lee and Luther Barnhardt Scholarship in the Depart- 
ment of History; Title IX Fellowship in the Department of Political Science 
and Public Administration; H. W. Close Fellowship through the College of 
Textiles. 

NATIONAL, REGIONAL AND FOUNDATION FELLOWSHIPS 

These awards are made to an individual rather than to the University. Recip- 
ients are chosen through competitions expressive of the terms of each award. 

Examples of these awards follow: 

NSF Graduate Fellowship— The Fellowship Office, National Research Coun- 
cil, 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. Pre-application packets 
are available in the Graduate School office, 115 Peele Hall. 

American Association of University Women Fellowships— Applications are 
available through local chapters. 

AFRICAN-AMERICAN GRADUATE ASSISTANCE GRANT 

The African-American Graduate Assistance Grant (AAGAG) is a grantsman- 
ship program created by North Carolina State University to aid in the support of 
African-American graduate students in all graduate programs of the Uni- 
versity. 

The AAGAG program provides stipends on a financial need basis up to $5,000 
for the academic year. Recipients must be full-time students pursuing master's 
or doctoral degrees or they must have received full admission for their first 
graduate degree at NCSU. 

The Graduate School should be contacted for further information. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP SUPPLEMENTS 

The NCSU Alumni Association each year funds Graduate Fellowship Sup- 
plements in an effort to recruit more outstanding graduate students, with the 
highly competitive award process being coordinated through the Graduate 
School office. For the 1988-89 academic year twenty-six Graduate Fellowship 
Supplements were funded; twenty-four of these were awarded across campus 
and two were awarded to support the management of University Archives. These 
supplements are awarded on a one-time-only basis as a financial incentive above 
and beyond whatever fellowship or assistantship may be offered. 



28 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

AMERICAN INDIAN STUDENT LEGISLATIVE GRANT PROGRAM 

The General Assembly of North Carolina has provided funds for the American 
Indian Student Legislative Grant Program for a number of grants to American 
Indian students interested in pursuing doctoral degrees at NCSU. The fellow- 
ships have a maximum value of $4,000 annually. 

To be eligible for a fellowship, interested students must be enrolled full-time 
and in good standing in a doctoral degree program, meet state residency 
requirements, have financial need and be an American Indian under the pro- 
gram's definition. This definition states that an eligible individual is one who 
maintains cultural identification as an American Indian through membership in 
an Indian tribe recognized by the State of North Carolina or by the federal 
government or through other tribal affiliation or community recognition. 

MINORITY PRESENCE GRANT PROGRAM 

Under the Board of Governors general Minority Presence Grant Program, 
black students may be eligible for special financial assistance if they are resi- 
dents of North Carolina, enrolled for at least three hours of degree-credit course 
work and demonstrate financial need. 

The Minority Presence Grant Program for Doctoral Study, Law and Veteri- 
nary Medicine provides stipends of up to $4,000 for the academic year, with an 
option of $500 in additional support for study in the summer sessions, for black 
residents of North Carolina who are selected to participate. Recipients must be 
full-time students pursuing doctoral degrees, law degrees or degrees in veteri- 
nary medicine at East Carolina University, North Carolina State University, 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill or The University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro. 

PATRICIA ROBERTS HARRIS GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

Patricia Roberts Harris Graduate Fellowships provide funds for minority or 
women graduate students who demonstrate financial need and who plan to enroll 
in programs where such students are traditionally underrepresented nationally. 
Currently, fellowships are offered in engineering, statistics, physics and ento- 
mology. Seven fellowships (with supplements), each in the amount of 
$12,000/year, were awarded through the Graduate School in 1989-90. Tuition 
and fees are also paid. Information pertaining to the fellowships and application 
forms are available in the Graduate School. 

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ASSIST ANTSHIPS FOR MINORITIES 

Funds are available on a matching basis with departments for research or 
teaching assistantships; however, the departmental appointment together with 
the University Research Assistantship appointment should not amount to less 
than other research or teaching assistantships in the department. Appropriate 
duties should be assigned to the student based on the one-quarter time appoint- 
ment. There are no restrictions with respect to the student's residency status. 

The Graduate School should be contacted for further information. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 29 



Other Financial Aid 
LONG-TERM LOANS 

Graduate students who are American citizens or eligible noncitizens may 
apply to the Financial Aid Office for consideration for long term, low interest 
loans. To qualify for loans, students must be making satisfactory academic 
progress and may require demonstration of financial need. The Financial Aid 
Form is the proper form to be completed for financial aid consideration. Other 
required forms— Student Data Sheet and Financial Aid Transcript— should be 
requested along with the FAF from the University's Financial Aid Office. Stu- 
dents are expected to apply for and to accept any available assistantships or 
fellowships before applying for loans. In the event that the funds available 
through the Financial Aid Office are insufficient to meet the need of all students 
who apply and are eligible, priority for these loans will be given to students 
working on their first undergraduate degree and graduate students will be 
referred to other programs (see Stafford Student Loans [formerly Guaranteed 
Student Loans.]) 

Perkins Loans (Formerly National Direct Student Loans): Graduate students 
may borrow up to $18,000 inclusive of any undergraduate Perkins Loans. There 
is no interest on the loan while the borrower is a full- or half-time student at an 
institution of higher education. Five months after ceasing to be at least a half- 
time student, if you are a new borrower, interest begins at five percent per year. 
The repayment period begins at the same time. A ten-year repayment period is 
possible for large indebtedness; however, a minimum payment of $30 per month 
is required. Interest does not accrue and repayment installments may be post- 
poned during any period not in excess of three years during which the borrower is 
a member of the Armed Forces of the United States or is a Peace Corps or Vista 
volunteer. Reduction of obligations to repay may result from teaching in schools 
with high concentrations of low income families or from teaching handicapped 
children. New legislation also provides that the Defense Department may repay a 
portion of your loan if you serve as an enlisted person in certain military occupa- 
tions after receiving a Perkins Loan. 

Institutional Long-Term Loans: These loans are made from University funds. 
Institutional loans are made and are to be repaid under the same terms as the 
Perkins Loans except that there are no forgiveness features. 
NOTE: Due to a lack of sufficient funds for all students, priority for Perkins 
Loans and Institutional Loans will be given to undergraduate students. 

Stafford Student Loans (Formerly Guaranteed Student Loan Program): This 
program provides loans from private lenders. Procedures are different in each 
state. Information for available loans may be obtained in the Financial Aid 
Office. Interest is at eight percent per year with the Federal government paying 
the interest during the in-school period. To determine eligibility for a Stafford 
Student Loan, the financial aid administrator will add the student's Expected 
Family Contribution to the student's other financial aid. If the total financial aid 
is less than the cost of education the student is considered to have need and is 
eligible for a Stafford Student Loan. 

Graduate/professional students who are eligible may borrow under the Staf- 
ford Student Loan program through College Foundation, Inc. or other lending 
agencies in the student's state of legal residence, a maximum of $7,500 per 



30 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

academic year or the total cost of education less other financial aid (including 
assistantships and fellowships) whichever is less. A maximum of $54,750 may be 
borrowed for graduate/professional study, including undergraduate loans. Col- 
lege Foundation Loans are insured by the North Carolina Education Assistance 
Authority or the United States Department of Education. Students from other 
states may obtain information about similar plans from the Financial Aid Office. 

PART-TIME JOBS 

The College Work Study Program is a federal program designed to provide 
part-time jobs to students who show need of financial assistance. The same 
application, the Financial Aid Form, is used to apply for both loans and jobs. 
Effort is made to assign students to jobs in keeping with their special interests 
and skills. As is the case with campus-administered loans, priority for these funds 
is given to undergraduate students pursuing their first undergraduate degree. 

Other jobs not based on need are listed at the Financial Aid Office and are open 
to all students. 

SHORT-TERM EMERGENCY LOANS 

Loans, usually in amounts of $100 or less, to meet emergency expenses may be 
obtained on short notice at the Financial Aid Office. These loans, in that they are 
designed for short term, emergency use, must be repaid within about 30 days. A 
loan may not be taken out between semesters or summer sessions. 

Military Education and Training 

The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) selects interested University 
students for enrollment in Army ROTC (AROTC) or in Air Force ROTC 
(AFROTC) for officer education and training leading toward a commission. 

The Army and Air Force ROTC departments educate and train University 
students, graduate and undergraduate, for a commission in their respective 
military services. These students must have four full semesters (undergraduate 
or graduate) remaining at the time they enter the ROTC Program (exceptions for 
Army ROTC are noted below). Uniforms and books for ROTC are provided. 
Transfer credit is allowed for previous ROTC course work at other institutions. 

Graduate students who will be at NCSU for at least two years may, upon 
successful completion of a six-weeks' summer leadership training period, be 
enrolled in the ROTC Program. Entry requirements for either program may also 
be met by having met any one of the following requirements: 

L Completed basic level ROTC courses as an undergraduate. 

2. Be an honorably discharged veteran. 

3. Have completed military basic training and be a member of an Army/Air 
Force Reserve or National Guard Unit. 

Air Force ROTC offers a Flight Screening Program for selected cadets which 
is conducted by an Air Force flying school in Texas during the summer at no 
expense to the student. Students successfully completing ROTC flight screening 
may be selected for further flight training as an Air Force pilot. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 31 

Graduate students enrolled in the junior and senior years of ROTC receive $100 
per month. Scholarships which pay all tuition, fees and costs of required text- 
books in addition to the $100 per month are available on a competitive basis. 

Special provisions for veterans are made in Army ROTC whereby they are 
granted placement credit for their prior service experience and training. Addi- 
tionally, Army ROTC offers the student several points of entry into the ROTC 
Program, under a process of granting ROTC placement credit for college courses 
or other worthwhile experiences that contribute to the requisite skills of a second 
lieutenant. Army ROTC counselors are available to evaluate the students' prior 
learning experiences and advise them as to where they can be placed in ROTC. 
Under the Army's Simultaneous Membership Program, the graduate student 
may participate in the Army Reserve or National Guard and receive approxi- 
mately $84 per month in addition to the $100 monthly stipend. The National 
Guard provides up to $500 tuition costs per year for its members. The student 
must enlist in the specified component and have completed basic training prior to 
entry into the program. 

Additional information on Army ROTC may be obtained from the Professor of 
Military Science, Room 154, Reynolds Coliseum (737-2428) and Air Force ROTC 
from the Professor of Aerospace Studies, Room 145, Reynolds Coliseum 
(737-2417). 

Health Services 

The Student Health Service, located in Clark Hall Infirmary, offers health 
care to students in a campus facility staffed by eight full-time physicians, three 
Family Nurse Practitioners, a pharmacist, laboratory technicians, registered 
nurses, health educators and support staff. 

During fall and spring semester, the Health Service is open 24 hours a day, 
seven days a week except during holidays and breaks. Physicians maintain 
regular office hours Monday through Friday and are on call at other times. 
(Students must check-in by 4:30 p.m. to see a physician.) A limited-hours out- 
patient clinic is in operation during summer sessions and semester breaks. 

All currently enrolled students are eligible for medical care. The pre-paid 
health fee covers professional services such as nurse and M.D. visits, laboratory 
tests, cold medications and health education. There is a nominal charge for 
x-rays, prescriptions and specialty clinics. Students are responsible for all ser- 
vices received off-campus, e.g., M.D. or hospital. 

HEALTH INSURANCE 

NCSU strongly encourages each student to have accident and sickness in- 
surance protection, either by their parents' group policy or under the NCSU 
Student Insurance Plan. The policy offered by the University helps cover the cost 
of referrals to off-campus specialists or to hospitals for serious illnesses. 

For your protection— with the average hospital charge at $512 per patient day 
in North Carolina (1988)— do not be uninsured! 

International students are required to enroll in a student health insurance 
program. 

A brochure describing the NCSU student plan is mailed to all students in July. 
Call 737-2563 for additional information. 



32 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Housing 
ON-CAMPUS HOUSING 

The University operates 19 residence halls for single students with a total 
capacity to accommodate approximately 6,300 students. Eight of the halls are 
arranged in suites of four or five rooms with a common bathroom. Ten others 
have rooms which open onto a central corridor with bathrooms at separate 
intervals. North Hall has private baths in each double room. 

Rooms are provided with basic furnishings such as bed, chest of drawers, desk, 
chair and waste basket for each double or single room occupant. An optional linen 
rental service is available through the University Laundry and Dry Cleaning 
Service. 

The 1989-90 rental fee for a main campus residence hall double room is $650 
per semester per student and may increase in future years. Room rents in North 
Hall and South Hall are higher. With the exception of Watauga Hall (graduate 
and upper class residence hall), new freshmen and continuing residents have 
priority for a room assignment over new graduate students. Students who are 
unable to secure on-campus housing before school begins may contact the Hous- 
ing Assignments Office, 1112 Student Services Center, on or after September 
concerning the availability of housing on campus at that time. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

The Housing Assignments Office also maintains a self-help facility which 
makes available listings of off-campus housing accommodations sent to them by 
private landlords; however, specific arrangements for this housing must be 
contracted for by those individuals concerned. The listings are not mailed as they 
change frequently and most landlords and tenants prefer to complete the rental 
transaction in person rather than by telephone or mail. The Housing Assign- 
ments Office is open from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday only. 

EDWARD S. KING VILLAGE 

The University also maintains 295 apartments for married couples, married 
couples with children, graduate students, single married students with no chil- 
dren and non-traditional undergraduate students. E. S. King Village includes 
studios, one-bedroom and two-bedroom apartments. The monthly rental rates for 
the 1989-90 year are $220 (includes gas) for studios, $220 for one-bedroom apart- 
ments and $245 for the two-bedroom apartments. All apartments have built-in 
dresser drawers, closets, a stove and a refrigerator. Interested students should 
write to E. S. King Village, P Building, North Carolina State University, 
Raleigh, NC 27607 for housing applications and information or telephone (919) 
737-2430. 



Additional Information 

If additional information is needed, contact the Graduate School, 103 Peele 
Hall, P. 0. Box 7102, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7102 
(telephone 919/737-2872). 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 33 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The Graduate School offers programs of study leading to the master's degree in 
77 fields and the doctorate in 48. Each student's program is planned with an 
advisory committee of graduate faculty members to provide the opportunity for 
gaining advanced knowledge in the particular field of study. Graduate education 
is the final stage in the development of intellectual independence. It is different 
from undergraduate education in that the student is encouraged to establish 
premises, to hypothesize and to defend both the procedure and the conclusions of 
independent investigation. The burden of proof for the verif lability of knowledge 
rests on the student, not on the faculty member. Emphasis is placed upon the 
student's scholarly development through formal course work, seminars, research 
and independent investigation. 

Graduate students are expected to familiarize themselves with the require- 
ments for the degrees for which they are candidates and are held responsible for 
the fulfillment of these requirements. 
The Graduate School offers courses of study in the following fields: 
Aerospace Engineering— M.S., Ph.D. 
Agricultural Economics — M.S. 
Agriculture — Master of 
Animal Science— M.S., Ph.D. 
Applied Mathematics— M.S., Ph.D. 
Architecture— Master of 
Archival Management— M. A. 
Biochemistry— M.S., Ph.D. 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Biomathematics— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Botany-M.S.. Ph.D. 

Chemical Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Chemistry— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Civil Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Computer Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Crop Science— M.S., Ph.D. 
Ecology— M.S. 

Economics— Master of, M.A., Ph.D. 

Education— (Master of Education offered in fields listed below) 
Adult and Community College Education— M.S., Ed.D. 
Agricultural Education— M.S. 
Curriculum and Instruction — M.S., Ed.D. 
Educational Administration and Supervision— M.S., Ed.D. 
Guidance and Personnel Services— M.S., Ed.D. 
Higher Education Administration— Master of, M.S., Ed.D. 
Industrial Arts Education— M.S., Ed.D. 
Mathematics Education— M.S., Ph.D. 
Middle Grades Education— M.S. 
Occupational Education— M.S., Ed.D. 
Science Education— M.S., Ph.D. 
Special Education— M.S. 
Vocational Industrial Education— M.S. 



34 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Electrical Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
*Engineering— Master of 
English— M. A. 
Entomology— M.S., Ph.D. 
Fiber and Polymer Science— Ph.D. 
Food Science— M.S., Ph.D. 
Forestry— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Genetics-M.S., Ph.D. 
History— M.A. 

Horticultural Science— M.S., Ph.D. 
Industrial Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering— Master of 
Landscape Architecture— Master of 
Liberal Studies— M.A. 
Life Sciences— Master of 
Management— M.S. 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences— M.S., Ph.D. 
Materials Science and Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Mathematics— M.S., Ph.D. 
Mechanical Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Microbiology— M.S., Ph.D. 
Nuclear Engineering— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Nutrition-M.S., Ph.D. 
Operations Research— M.S., Ph.D. 
Physics-M.S., Ph.D. 
Physiology-M.S., Ph.D. 
Plant Pathology-M.S., Ph.D. 
Political Science— M.A. 
Poultry Science— M.S. 
Product Design— Master of 
Psychology-M.S., Ph.D. 
Public Affairs— Master of 

Recreation Resources Administration— Master of, M.S. 
Rural Sociology— M.S. 
Sociology— Master of, Ph.D. 
Soil Science-M.S., Ph.D. 
Statistics— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Technical Communication — M.S. 
Technology for International Development— Master of 
Textile Chemistry— M.S. 

Textile Engineering and Science— Master of, M.S. 
Textile Management and Technology— Master of, M.S. 
Toxicology— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Veterinary Medical Sciences— M.S., Ph.D. 
Wildlife Biology— Master of, M.S. 
Wood and Paper Science— Master of, M.S., Ph.D. 
Zoology-M.S., Ph.D. 

•Off-campus only. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 35 



Master's Degrees 



The Graduate School offers programs of study leading to the Master of Science 
degree, the Master of Arts degree and the Master's degree in certain designated 
fields. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE AND MASTER OF ARTS 

For all Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees, the programs are 
planned with the objective of making possible a reasonable, comprehensive 
mastery of the subject matter in the chosen field. Training and experience in 
research are provided to familiarize the student with the methods, ideals and 
goals of independent investigation. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

The advisory committee is composed of at least three members of the Graduate 
Faculty, one of whom is designated as the chair and one of whom represents the 
supporting area. This committee is appointed by the Graduate Dean upon the 
recommendation of the head of the major department. 

The student's program of study is planned so as to provide a comprehensive 
view of the major field of interest and to provide training in research in this field 
and related areas of knowledge. As great a latitude is permitted in the selection of 
courses as is compatible with a well-defined major and supporting courses. In 
general, it is expected that approximately two-thirds of the course work will be in 
the major and one-third in supporting courses. Since there are many possible 
combinations of course work, a specific Plan of Graduate Work is developed by 
the advisory committee with the student. The program of course work to be 
followed by the student and the thesis problem selected must be approved by the 
student's advisory committee, the head of the department and the Graduate 
School. The Plan of Graduate Work should be submitted to the Graduate School 
for approval prior to completion of one-half of the program. 

CO-MAJOR 

Students may co-major at the master's level with the approval of both depart- 
ments and appropriate representation on the advisory committee. Co-majors 
must meet all requirements for majors in both departments. One degree is 
awarded and the co-major is noted on the transcript. A co-major must involve 
degree programs with similar requirements. Co-majors are not permitted 
between thesis and non-thesis degree programs or between Doctor of Philosophy 
and Doctor of Education degree programs. Enrolled co-majors will be classified 
in only one program for record purposes. 

RESIDENCE 

Students engaged in a course of study leading to the Master of Science or 
Master of Arts degree are required to be in residence, pursuing graduate work, 
for a minimum of one full academic year or its equivalent. 



36 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CREDITS 

A minimum of 30 semester credits is required for the Master of Science or 
Master of Arts; however, the number of credit hours included in a Plan of 
Graduate Work often exceeds this minimum. At least 20 semester hours must 
come from 500- and 600-level courses. The program may include no more than six 
hours of research and no more than two hours of departmental seminar, unless 
the total program exceeds 30 hours. Courses at the 400-level counted toward the 
minimal 30-hour requirement may not come from the major field. 

CREDIT FROM OUTSIDE SOURCES 

Transfer Credit. No more than six of the required academic credits will be 
accepted from other institutions. A graduate course may be considered for 
transfer to a master's program provided it has been completed in a graduate or 
post-baccalaureate classification at an accredited graduate school with a grade of 
"B" or better. Transfer credit may not be used to fill the 20-hour 500- and 
600-level course requirement in master's programs. Credit accepted by extension 
reduces the amount of credit that may be transferred from other institutions. 

Transfer of Undergraduate Credit. No graduate credit will be allowed for 
excess credits completed in an undergraduate classification at another insti- 
tution. 

Correspondence Courses and Extension Courses. No graduate credit will 
be allowed for correspondence courses or for courses completed by extension at 
universities other than NCSU. 

Credit by Extension. A maximum of six semester credits taken prior to 
admission to a graduate program and earned through NCSU extension study 
may be applied toward degree requirements provided the courses are graduate 
level and are taught by members of the NCSU Graduate Faculty. If a student has 
been admitted to the Graduate School and an approved Plan of Graduate Work 
has been submitted, six additional semester credits may be obtained in off- 
campus NCSU graduate courses to apply toward the minimal credit hour 
requirement for the degree. Credit accepted by extension reduces the amount of 
credit which may be transferred from other institutions. 

GRADING AND ACADEMIC STANDING 

Performance in lecture courses is evaluated as "A" (Excellent), "B" (Good), "C" 
(Passing), "D" or "NC" (No credit). In order to receive graduate degree credit, a 
grade of "C" or higher is required. All grades on courses taken for graduate credit 
as an undergraduate at NCSU and all grades on courses taken in a graduate 
classification at NCSU in courses numbered 400 and above are included in the 
graduate grade point average. Courses at the 300 level and below are not consi- 
dered for graduate credit and grades earned on them do not enter the grade point 
average. 

Performance in research, seminar and special problems courses is evaluated as 
either "S" (Satisfactory) or "U" (Unsatisfactory), and these grades are not used in 
computing the grade point average. However, a student who receives a "U" on 
any course will not receive credit for that course and may be required to repeat it. 

The "Master Listing of Approved Graduate Courses" identifies the approved 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 37 

grading (A,B,C,D,NC or S,U) for each 500- and 600-level course. Generally, 
courses numbered through the 590 series and the 690 series will receive "S" or 
"U" grading. Other course numbers will carry A,B,C,D,NC grading. Any devia- 
tion from the approved grading for a particular course must be requested by the 
department and approved by the Academic College/School Dean and the Gradu- 
ate Dean prior to teaching the course. Also included in the GPA calculation and 
the determination of academic standing are all 400-600-level credits earned by a 
student in a PBS classification at NCSU within six years of the date of enrollment 
as a graduate student. (See the Post-baccalaureate Studies section for restric- 
tions concerning Post-baccalaureate Studies courses.) 

At the discretion of the instructor, students may be given an "IN" (Incomplete) 
grade for work not completed because of a serious interruption in their work not 
caused by their own negligence. An "IN" must not be used, however, as a substi- 
tute for an NC when the student's performance in the course is deserving of No 
Credit. An "IN" is only appropriate when the student's record in the course is 
such that the successful completion of particular assignments, projects, or tests 
missed as a result of a documented serious event would enable that student to pass 
the course. Only work missed may be averaged into the grades already recorded 
for that student. A student who receives an "IN" must complete the unfinished 
work to have the Incomplete converted to a final grade by the end of the next 
semester in which the student is enrolled provided that this period is not longer 
than 12 months from the end of the semester or summer session in which the 
Incomplete was received; otherwise, the "IN" will be automatically converted to 
"NC" or "U," in accord with the grading approved for the particular course. All 
grades of "IN" must be cleared prior to graduation. Students must not register 
again for any courses in which they have "IN" grades; such registration does not 
remove "IN" grades, and the completion of the course on the second occasion will 
automatically result in an NC for the incompleted course. 

Except in the case of Interinstitutional Registration (see p. 18), grades on 
courses transferred from another institution will not be included in computing 
the grade point average. 

Graduate students are given a notice of academic warning if they have accumu- 
lated less than nine hours at the 400-level or above and have less than a 3.0 ("B" 
average). Graduate students are placed on academic probation if they accumu- 
late nine or more but less than eighteen credit hours at the 400-level or above and 
have a grade point average of less than 3.0 ("B" average). A student's graduate 
study is terminated if eighteen or more credit hours at the 400-level or above are 
accumulated with a grade point average of less than 3.0 ("B" average). In the case 
of program termination, no further registration in a graduate classification will 
be permitted. Under extenuating circumstances the student will be reinstated 
upon the written recommendation of the department and approval by the Gradu- 
ate Dean. (Effective Fall 1978 for all graduate students.) Departments have the 
prerogative of recommending the termination of a student's graduate admission 
at any time. 

Students who are eligible to attend the first summer session are eligible to 
attend either or both summer sessions. For example, students who receive a 
notice of "Graduate Admission Terminated" at the end of the first summer 
session may register for the second summer session unless the major department 
recommends otherwise. 



38 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

A graduate student must be in good academic standing ("B" or better average) 
to be eligible for appointment to an assistantship, fellowship or traineeship and 
must be registered in each semester in which the appointment is in effect. 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language (Germanic, Romance or 
Slavic) is required by some programs for the Master of Arts and the Master of 
Science degrees. Students should contact the major department for specific 
language requirements. 

Proficiency can be demonstrated in one of two ways: 

1. By passing a traditional reading knowledge examination, which can be 
requested by the student at any time. 

2. By passing the final examination in a course especially designed for gradu- 
ate students who have no previous knowledge of a foreign language or who 
wish to refresh their knowledge of a language. The Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures offers such courses, normally in the fall, for each 
of the three major foreign languages: French (FLF 401), German (FLG 401) 
and Spanish (FLS 401). These courses concentrate exclusively on teaching 
students to understand the written word and do not provide instruction or 
testing in speaking and original composition. Failure to pass the course 
carries with it no penalty other than the fact that the student's language 
requirement will remain unfulfilled. These courses are neither counted for 
credit nor used in computing the grade point average. 

THESIS 

Theses prepared by candidates for the Master of Science or Master of Arts 
degree must represent an original investigation into a subject which has been 
approved by the student's advisory committee and the head of the major depart- 
ment. Three copies of the thesis in final form as approved by the advisory 
committee, each signed by the members of the advisory committee, must be 
submitted to the Graduate School by a specific deadline in the semester or 
summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. Detailed information on 
form and organization of the thesis is presented in the University's Guide for the 
Preparation of Theses, which is available in the Graduate School office. 

COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAMINATIONS 

Written examinations covering the subject matter of the major and supporting 
fields may be required of the candidate. When required, such examinations must 
be successfully completed prior to requesting the comprehensive oral examina- 
tion. Information concerning written examination schedules should be obtained 
from the student's major department. 

COMPREHENSIVE ORAL EXAMINATIONS 

A candidate for the Master of Science or Master of Arts degree must pass a 
comprehensive oral examination to demonstrate to the advisory committee that 
he or she possesses a reasonable mastery of the subject matter of the major and 
supporting fields and that this knowledge can be used with promptness and 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 39 

accuracy. This examination may not be held until all other requirements, except 
completion of the course work in current registration during the final semester, 
are satisfied. Application for the examination must be filed with the Dean of the 
Graduate School by the chair of the advisory committee at least two weeks prior 
to the date on which the examination is to be held and, in the case of thesis 
degrees, after the thesis is complete except for such revisions which may be 
necessary as a result of the final examination. 

A unanimous vote of approval by the advisory committee is required for 
passing the oral examination. Approval of the examination may be conditioned, 
however, upon the completion of additional work to the satisfaction of the advi- 
sory committee. A formal reexamination will not be required in this case. Failure 
of a student to pass the oral examination terminates the student's graduate work 
at this institution unless otherwise unanimously recommended by the advisory 
committee. Only one reexamination will be permitted. All committee actions 
may be appealed by written application to the Graduate Dean. 

Oral examinations for master's degree candidates are open to the graduate 
faculty by right and to the University community by unanimous consent of the 
advisory committee and the student being examined. Discussions and decisions 
regarding the student's performance are private to the advisory committee. 

TIME LIMIT 

All requirements for the master's degree must be completed within six 
calendar years, beginning with the date the student commences courses carrying 
graduate credit applicable to the degree program, unless a more restrictive time 
limit has been established by the academic college/school. 

MASTER'S DEGREE IN A DESIGNATED FIELD 

The University offers a number of master's degree programs in designated 
fields. The degree offerings are listed below. These programs vary in require- 
ments and persons having an interest in these programs are advised to contact 
the major department for further information including specific prerequisites 
and degree requirements. General Graduate School policies as stated on page 35 
through 39 apply to these degree programs with the exception of references to the 
master's thesis. 

MASTER OF AGRICULTURE DEGREE AND 
MASTER OF LIFE SCIENCES DEGREE 

The requirements for either of these degrees are as follows: 

1. A total of 36 semester hours is required. 

2. A minimum of four semester hours in special problems is required; not 
more than six semester hours in special problems will be allowed. This work 
replaces the research thesis requirement for the Master of Science or Mas- 
ter of Arts degrees. 

3. A minimum of 20 credit hours of 500- or 600-level course work is required. 

In all other respects, the requirements for the Master of Agriculture or the 
Master of Life Sciences degree are the same as those for the Master of Science and 
Master of Arts degrees. 



40 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Summary of Procedures for Master's Degrees 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or depart- 
ment head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student. 

3. Receipt of application materials and required fee. 

4. Review of application materials by department or program. 

5. Department forwards recommendation regarding applicant's admissibil- 
ity to Graduate Dean. 

6. The department's recommendation is reviewed and the student is notified of 
the action taken on the request for admission. 

7. Student arrives, reports to the department, is assigned an adviser and 
makes out a roster of courses in consultation with the departmental adviser. 

8. Advisory committee of three or more graduate faculty members, one of 
whom is designated as the chair and one of whom represents the supporting 
field, appointed by the Graduate Dean upon the recommendation of the 
department head. 

9. Plan of Work prepared by the advisory committee with the student and 
submitted in quadruplicate to the department head and the Graduate 
School for approval prior to completion of one-half of the proposed program. 

10. Three copies of the approved Plan of Work returned to the department. One 
copy is kept in department files, one is returned to the committee chair and 
one is given to the student. 

11. Student passes language examination (if required by the major depart- 
ment). 

12. Written examination in the major and/or supporting fields may be required 
of the candidate. If required, written examinations must be successfully 
completed prior to requesting the comprehensive oral examination. 

13. A copy of a preliminary draft of the thesis is submitted to the chair of the 
student's advisory committee for review. (Thesis degrees only). 

14. The diploma order request form must be filed with the Graduate School by 
the end of the third week of the semester or summer session of anticipated 
graduation. Failure to submit the form by this date may result in the 
student's not receiving the diploma at graduation. 

15. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chair of the 
student's advisory committee submits the thesis to advisory committee 
me Tibers for review. (Thesis degrees only). 

16. The final oral examination may be scheduled when all other requirements 
except completion of the course work for the final semester are satisfied 
and, in the case of thesis degrees, after the thesis is complete except for such 
revisions as may be necessary as a result of the examination. Permission for 
the candidate to take the final oral examination is requested of the Graduate 
School at least two weeks before the examination. Specific deadline dates 
for non-thesis master's candidates appear in The Calendar. 

17. The Graduate Dean schedules the examination and notifies the student and 
advisory committee of the time and place. The report on the final examina- 
tion should be filed with the Graduate School as soon as the examination has 
been completed. 

18. Three copies of the thesis signed by each member of the student's advisory 
committee must be submitted to the Graduate School by a specific deadline 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 41 

in the semester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. 
Specific deadline dates appear in The Calendar. 

19. The thesis is reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that the format 
conforms with the specifications prescribed in the Guide for the Preparation 
of Theses. (Thesis degrees only). 

20. All course work scheduled in a graduate degree classification must be 
completed prior to graduation. 

21. A grade point average of at least 3.0 for the degree requirements as well as 
on overall course work is required for graduation. 

22. All degree requirements must be completed within six calendar years, 
beginning with the date the student commences courses carrying graduate 
credit applicable to the degree program, unless a more restrictive time limit 
has been established by the academic college/school. 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees 

The doctorate symbolizes the ability of the recipient to undertake original 
research and scholarly work at the highest levels without supervision. The degree 
is therefore not granted simply upon completion of a stated amount of course 
work but rather upon demonstration by the student of a comprehensive knowl- 
edge and high attainment in scholarship in a specialized field of study. The 
student must demonstrate this ability by writing a dissertation reporting the 
results of an original investigation and by passing a series of comprehensive 
examinations in the field of specialization and related areas of knowledge. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

An advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members, one of whom 
will be designated as chair, will be appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School 
upon the recommendation of the head of the major department. The committee, 
which must include at least one representative of the minor field, will, with the 
student, prepare a Plan of Graduate Work which must be approved by the 
department head and the Graduate School. In addition to the course work to be 
undertaken, the subject of the student's dissertation must appear on the plan; and 
any subsequent changes in committee or subject or in the overall plan must be 
submitted for approval. 

The program of work must be unified, and all constituent parts must contrib- 
ute to an organized program of study and research. Courses must be selected 
from groups embracing one principal subject of concentration, the major, and 
from a cognate field, the minor. Normally, a student will select the minor work 
from a single discipline or field which, in the judgment of the advisory commit- 
tee, provides relevant support to the major field. However, when the advisory 
committee finds that the needs of the student will best be served by work in an 
interdisciplinary minor, it has the alternative of developing a special program in 
lieu of the usual minor. 

CO-MAJOR 

Students may co-major at the doctoral level with the approval of both depart- 
ments and appropriate representation on the advisory committee. Co-majors 
must meet all requirements for majors in both departments. One degree is 



42 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

awarded and the co-major is noted on the transcript. A co-major must involve 
degree programs with similar requirements. Co-majors are not permitted 
between thesis and non-thesis degree programs or between Doctor of Philosophy 
and Doctor of Education degree programs. Enrolled co-majors will be classified 
in only one program for record purposes. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

For the Doctor of Philosophy and the Doctor of Education degrees, the student 
is expected to be registered for graduate work at an accredited graduate school 
for at least six semesters beyond the baccalaureate degree. 

The basic University residence requirements are defined below. However, 
academic colleges/schools have the prerogative of establishing more restrictive 
requirements within the respective colleges/schools. (The College of Education 
and Psychology requires a minimum of one academic year of full-time resident 
study). 

At least two residence credits, as defined below, must be secured in continuous 
residence (registration in consecutive semesters) as a graduate student at the 
University. Failure to take work during the summer does not break continuity; 
however, summer work may be used in partial fulfillment of this requirement. 

Residence credit is determined by the number of semester hours of graduate 
work carried during a given term. During a regular semester, residence credit is 
calculated in the following manner: 

Semester Credits (Hours) Residence Credits 
9 or more 1 

6-8 2/3 

less than 6 (including registration 1/3 

for "Thesis Preparation") 

The residence credit for a six-week summer term is equal to one-half of the 
corresponding amount for a regular semester. For example, six semester hours 
carried during a summer session will earn one-third of a residence credit; less 
than six credit hours will earn one-sixth of a residence credit. 

GRADING AND ACADEMIC STANDING 

The grading system and grade requirements for all doctoral programs are the 
same as those for master's degree programs, as described on pages 36-37. 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A reading knowledge of at least one modern foreign language is required by 
some departments for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Doctoral students should 
contact the major department for specific language requirements. For the Doc- 
tor of Education degree, the decision as to whether or not there will be a language 
requirement is left to the student's advisory committee. 

Students who choose to demonstrate a reading knowledge of a language may 
select from any of the Romance, Germanic or Slavic languages (or any combina- 
tion in those programs requiring two languages). The Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures offers courses in French, German and Spanish espe- 
cially designed for graduate students who have no previous knowledge of a 
foreign language or who wish to refresh their knowledge of a language. These 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 43 

courses concentrate exclusively on teaching students to understand the written 
word and do not provide instruction or testing in speaking and original composi- 
tion. A passing grade on the final examination in one of these courses is sufficient 
evidence of a reading knowledge of the language. 

To demonstrate comprehension in depth of one language, a student must not 
only prove that one possesses a reading knowledge of the language but also that he 
or she is proficient in the oral and compositional elements of that language. 
Students desiring to master one language in depth should consult the head of the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures concerning the specific 
courses which will be necessary to achieve this comprehension; specific arran- 
gements will depend upon the student's background in the language. 

Students whose native language is other than English may use English as one 
of the languages when two are required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. 
When English is submitted in partial fulfillment of the dual language require- 
ment, the native language may not be used as the other language. 

When only one language is required in the student's program, certification for 
that language must occur on this campus. 

PRELIMINARY COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS 

After completing the language requirement but not earlier than the end of the 
second year of graduate study and not later than one semester (four months) 
before the final oral examination, each doctoral student is required to take the 
preliminary comprehensive examinations. The examinations consist of two 
parts: written examinations and an oral examination. Requirements for written 
examinations in the minor field are left to the discretion of the department in 
which the student is minoring. 

The written portion may be conducted in one of two ways. In the first, each 
member of the advisory committee prepares a set of questions for the student's 
response, and answers to each set are returned to the appropriate member for 
grading. This procedure is used by departments which have a relatively small 
number of doctoral students. 

Many of the larger departments have developed departmental written exami- 
nations to be used for all students. These examinations are given several times 
during the year, and scheduled dates are announced well in advance. Where 
written departmental examinations of this kind are used, the student will be 
expected to make arrangements to schedule these examinations. 

Regardless of the method employed, the questions involved may cover any 
phase of the course work taken by the student during graduate study or any 
subject logically related to an understanding of the subject matter in the major 
and minor areas of study. The questions are designed to measure the student's 
mastery of the subject matter and the adequacy of preparation for research. 
Failure to pass the written preliminary examinations terminates the student's 
work at this institution, subject to departmental and/or college/school policies 
with respect to reexamination. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the written portion of the preliminary exami- 
nations and after completion of all course work relevant to the examination, 
authorization for the preliminary oral examination is requested from the Gradu- 
ate School. This examination is conducted by the student's advisory committee 
and a representative from the Graduate School and is open to all graduate faculty 



44 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

members. The student and the examining committee will be notified by the 
Graduate School of the arranged time and place. The oral examination is 
designed to test the student's ability to relate factual knowledge to specific 
circumstances, to use this knowledge with accuracy and promptness and to 
demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the field of specialization and 
related areas. 

A unanimous vote of approval by the members of the advisory committee is 
required for the student to pass the preliminary oral examination. Approval may 
be conditioned, however, on the successful completion of additional work in some 
particular field(s). All committee actions may be appealed by written application 
to the Graduate Dean. 

Failure to pass the preliminary oral examination terminates the student's 
work at this institution unless the examining committee recommends a reexami- 
nation. No reexamination may be given until at least one full semester has 
elapsed, and only one reexamination is permitted. 

CANDIDACY 

A doctoral student is admitted to candidacy upon passing the preliminary 
examinations without conditions or after fulfilling any conditions specified by 
the advisory committee. 

FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION 

The final oral examination is scheduled after the dissertation is complete 
except for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the examination, but 
not earlier than one semester or its equivalent after admission to candidacy and 
not before all required course work has been completed or is currently in pro- 
gress. The examination consists of the candidate's defense of the methodology 
used and the conclusions reached in the research, as reported in the dissertation. 
It is conducted by an examining committee, which consists of the student's 
advisory committee and a Graduate School representative. This examination is 
open to the University community. 

A unanimous vote of approval of the advisory committee is required for passing 
the final oral examination. Approval may be conditioned, however, on the stu- 
dent's meeting specific requirements prescribed by the student's advisory com- 
mittee. Failure of a student to pass the examination terminates one's work at this 
institution unless the advisory committee recommends a reexamination. No 
reexamination may be given until one full semester has elapsed and only one 
reexamination is permitted. 

THE DISSERTATION 

The doctoral dissertation presents the results of the student's original investi- 
gation in the field of major interest. It must represent a contribution to knowl- 
edge, be adequately supported by data and be written in a manner consistent 
with the highest standards of scholarship. Publication is expected. 

The dissertation will be reviewed by all members of the advisory committee 
and must receive their approval prior to submission to the Graduate School. 
Three copies of the document signed by all members of the student's advisory 
committee must be submitted to the Graduate School by a specific deadline in the 
semester or summer session in which the degree is to be conferred. Prior to final 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 45 

approval, the dissertation will be reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that 
the format conforms to the specifications prescribed in the Guide for the Prepara- 
tion of Theses. Detailed information on form and organization of the dissertation 
is presented in the University's Guide for the Preparation of Theses which is 
available in the Graduate School office. 

The University has a requirement that all doctoral dissertations be micro- 
filmed by University Microfilms International, of Ann Arbor, Michigan, which 
includes publication of the abstract in Dissertation Abstracts International. The 
student is required to pay for the microfilming service. (See "Special Registra- 
tion and Fees" under "Tuition and Fees.") 

TIME LIMIT 

Doctoral students are allowed a maximum of six calendar years from admis- 
sion to the doctoral program to attain candidacy for the degree and a maximum of 
ten calendar years to complete all degree requirements. Academic colleges/- 
schools or departments may have more restrictive requirements than the above 
stated University policy. All students admitted to doctoral programs effective 
Fall 1979 are subject to the above policy. Time limits for students admitted to 
doctoral programs prior to Fall 1979 but who were not admitted to candidacy as 
of Fall 1979 and who do not meet the above policy will be considered on an 
individual basis. Doctoral students admitted to candidacy prior to the 1979 fall 
semester are subject to the previous policy which allowed seven calendar years 
from admission to candidacy to completion of all degree requirements. 

Summary of Procedures for the Doctor of Philosophy 
and Doctor of Education Degrees 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or depart- 
ment head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student. 

3. Receipt of application materials and required fee. 

4. Review of application materials by department or program. 

5. Department forwards recommendation regarding applicant's admissibility 
to Graduate Dean 

6. The department's recommendation is reviewed and the student is notified of 
the action taken on the request for admission. 

7. Student arrives, reports to the department, is assigned an adviser and 
makes out a roster of courses in consultation with the departmental adviser. 

8. Advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members, one of whom 
is designated as the chair and one of whom represents the minor field, 
appointed by the Graduate Dean upon the recommendation of the depart- 
ment head. 

9. A dissertation subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research 
submitted to the student's advisory committee and the department head for 
review and approval. 

10. Plan of Work prepared by the advisory committee with the student and 
submitted in quadruplicate to the department head and the Graduate 
School for approval as soon as feasible after completion of 12 hours of course 
work. 



46 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

11. Three copies of the approved Plan of Work returned to the department. One 
copy is kept in department files, one is returned to the committee chair and 
one is given to the student. 

12. Student passes language examination(s). (See page 42.) 

13. Written examinations in the major and minor fields are scheduled no earlier 
than the end of the second year of graduate study and not later than one 
semester before the final oral examination. The results of these examina- 
tions will be reported to the Graduate School. 

14. When all written examinations have been completed satisfactorily, the 
chairman requests the scheduling of the preliminary oral examination at 
least two weeks prior to the suggested date. Upon approval of the request, a 
graduate faculty member is selected to represent the Graduate School at the 
examination, and the student and examining committee are notified of the 
time and place. The report of the examination is sent to the Graduate School 
and if the examination has been passed without conditions, the student is 
admitted to candidacy 

15. A copy of the preliminary draft of the dissertation is submitted to the chair 
of the student's advisory committee for review. 

16. The diploma order request form must be filed with the Graduate School by 
the end of the third week of the semester or summer session of anticipated 
graduation. Failure to submit the form by this date may result in the 
student's not receiving the diploma at graduation. 

17. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chair of the 
student's advisory committee submits the dissertation to advisory commit- 
tee members for review. 

18. One semester or its equivalent after admission to candidacy or later, and 
after the dissertation is complete except for such revisions as may be neces- 
sary as a result of the final examination, permission for the candidate to take 
the final oral examination is requested of the Graduate School by the chair of 
the candidate's advisory committee. Requests should be filed at least two 
weeks before the date of the examination. Upon approval of the request, the 
student and the examining committee, including a Graduate School repre- 
sentative, are notified of the time and place of the examination. The Gradu- 
ate School Representative receives a copy of the dissertation at least one 
week prior to the examination. 

19. Three copies of the dissertation signed by each member of the student's 
advisory committee and five copies of the abstract must be submitted to the 
Graduate School by a specific deadline in the semester or summer session in 
which the degree is to be conferred. Specific deadline dates appear in The 
Calendar. One copy each of the University Microfilms Agreement and the 
Survey of Earned Doctorate forms must be submitted with the dissertation. 

20. The dissertation is reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that the 
format conforms with the specifications prescribed in the Guide for the 
Preparation of Theses. 

21. All course work scheduled in a graduate degree classification must be 
completed prior to graduation. 

22. A grade point average of at least 3.0 is required for graduation. 

23. The statute of limitations for completion of degree requirements is de- 
scribed on page 45. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 47 



The D. H. Hill Library 



The NCSU Libraries consist of the D. H. Hill Library and five branch libraries. They 
contain more than L2 million volumes of books and bound journals, 800,000 federal 
government publications, and more than 2.5 million microforms. The collections are par- 
ticularly strong in the biological and physical sciences, engineering, agriculture, forestry, 
textiles and architecture, with the arts, humanities and social sciences also well repres- 
ented. The Libraries regularly receive more than 19,300 serials. Five special libraries— the 
Burlington Textiles Library in Nelson Hall, the Harrye B. Lyons Design Library in Brooks 
Hall, the College of Forest Resources Library in Biltmore Hall, the Veterinary Medical 
Library in the Veterinary Medical Building and the Curriculum Materials Center in Poe 
Hall— serve the special needs of their respective school and colleges. 

The NCSU Libraries have been a depository for U. S. federal documents since 1924 and 
receive over 94 percent of these publications. The Libraries also receive microfiche 
research reports published by the Department of Energy, the National Aeronautical and 
Space Administration (NASA), the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and 
the National Technical Information Service (NTIS). The library is an official U.S. Patent 
depository and has a complete collection of U.S. patents on microfilm from 1790 to date. 

The BIS on-line, computer-based author, title and subject catalog permits rapid identifi- 
cation of monographs and serials in the collections of the NCSU Libraries as well as those of 
Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill. This resource sharing greatly enhances the 
research capabilities of the NCSU Libraries. This is made possible through the Libraries' 
participation in the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN). An automated circula- 
tion system introduced in the 1989-90 year provides quick, easy check-out of books by 
borrowers. 

On-line computer-based literature searches are offered by the library for a number of 
data bases, ERIC, BIOSIS, AGRICOLA (Bibliography of Agriculture) and Psychological 
Abstracts. Only direct costs are charged to the user. In addition, a number of bibliographic 
data bases are provided on CS-ROM and laser disk formats for computerized literature 
searching by users at no charge. 

As a further aid to graduate and faculty research, the Libraries provides interlibrary 
loan services to obtain material from other research libraries. Direct borrowing privileges 
are available with UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke University. 

Among the many services offered by the library are orientation tours for faculty and 
graduate students and also lectures on library use to all new students. Comprehensive 
reference service is available almost all the hours the library is open. A variety of microtext 
readers and printers in the library and an extensive microfilm collection provide access to 
much important research material. The Media Center is equipped with audio and video 
equipment for group and individual viewing and listening. The Library has a growing 
collection of video and audio cassettes for individual and class use. 

Institutes 

RESEARCH TRIANGLE 

The unique "Research Triangle" in North Carolina has captured national and interna- 
tional attention. It is a complex of three major research universities and a research park. 
Because of this wealth of educational and research opportunities, the Triangle area con- 
tains the highest total of Ph.D. scientists and engineers on a per capita basis in the nation. 
The Triangle Universities— NCSU, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and 
Duke University— have a subsidiary campus in the Park— the Research Triangle Insti- 
tute—which has an annual research revenue of approximately $60 million. 

The Park, which announced its first tenant in 1965, now has over 57 public and industrial 
research organizations situated on 6,650 acres of land. Over 25,000 people work in the 
Research Triangle Park. Organizations in the Park include the permanent headquarters of 
the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Environmental Protection 
Agency and the National Center for the Humanities as well as facilities of private com- 
panies like IBM, Glaxco and Burroughs Wellcome. Two major new research complexes for 
microelectronics and biotechnology were recently built in the Park and the North Carolina 



48 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Supercomputer building is under construction. Faculty and graduate students from the 
universities work closely with many of the companies and agencies in the Park and 
scientists from the Park frequently hold adjunct appointments in one or another of the 
Triangle Universities. 

INSTITUTE OF STATISTICS 

The Institute of Statistics is composed of two sections, one at Raleigh and the other at 
Chapel Hill. At North Carolina State University, the Institute provides statistical consult- 
services ing to all branches of the institution, sponsors research in statistical theory and 
methodology and coordinates the teaching of statistics at the undergraduate and graduate 
levels. The instructional and other academic functions are performed by the Department of 
Statistics, which forms a part of the Institute. 

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

The Water Resources Research Institute is a unit of the University of North Carolina 
System and is located on the campus of North Carolina State University. The deans of the 
College of Engineering and College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the Vice Chancellor 
for Research at North Carolina State University and two faculty members from the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill serve as a board of directors. The Institute was 
established to promote a multidisciplinary attack on water problems, to develop and 
support research in response to the needs of North Carolina, to encourage strengthened 
educational programs in water resources, to coordinate research and educational programs 
dealing with water resources and to provide a link between the state and federal water 
resources agencies and related interests in the University. 

Research and educational activities are conducted through established departments and 
schools of the University System. All senior colleges and universities of North Carolina are 
eligible to participate in the Institute's research program. Basic support for the Institute's 
program is provided by the Office of Water Research and Technology, U.S. Department of 
the Interior, under the Water Research and Development Act of 1978 and appropriations 
from the State of North Carolina. 

The Institute has sponsored a graduate minor in water resources which offers a strong 
water resources program with the major in any of the basic disciplines contributing to 
water resources planning, conservation, development and management. This capitalizes on 
the combined training resources of the Raleigh and Chapel Hill campuses of the University 
System and offers these in an organized way to graduate students seeking interdisciplinary 
training in this field. Additional information concerning the program is presented else- 
where in this catalog. 

The Institute sponsors research and educational symposia and seminars, encourages the 
development of specialized training opportunities and provides a means for the continuing 
evaluation and strengthening of the University System's total water resources program. 

Special Laboratories and Facilities 

ACADEMIC COMPUTING FACILITIES 

Centralized computing facilities for the University are located in the Hillsborough 
Building and in other campus buildings. The Computing Center provides computing 
services as well as networking services via the University's Computer Communications 
System which links many computing systems on campus, including the on-line Library 
catalog. Access to computing services at other centers and universities and other network 
services are provided using the Internet and Bitnet. The University is one of the participat- 
ing institutions in the North Carolina Supercomputer Center, and high bandwidth com- 
munications are provided to the CRAY Y-MP at that Center. 

The Computing Center facility includes an IBM 3090 and a VAX 8700. Printing facilities 
and interactive terminals are located throughout the campus and are served by the campus 
network. The Computing Center also provides an array of centralized services including 
consultation,shortcourses, software licensing, a campus information service and a library 
of public domain software. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 49 

A number of special purpose computing facilities also exist. The Computer Graphics 
Center (CGC) provides a centralized hardware and software facility for image processing 
and remote sensing. VAX computers and microcomputers are used with peripherals 
including image display and manipulation devices, plotters, a color graphics camera 
system and digitizing tables. Software includes packages for remote sensing, image pro- 
cessing, time series analysis and computer graphics. Other facilities in most col- 
leges/schools provide specialized educational and research computing for their students. 

BIOLOGY FIELD LABORATORY 

The Biology Field Laboratory is located eight miles from the University campus and 
comprises a 20-acre pond, 180 acres of extremely varied vegetation types and a modern 
laboratory building. The latter contains two laboratories, one for class use and another 
principally for research. 

The many unique ecological situations found in this area make it ideal for use by 
advanced classes of most biological science departments. Likewise, the area is well adapted 
to a variety of research projects by faculty, graduate students and undergraduates because 
of its habitat diversity. The close proximity of the laboratory facility to the campus makes 
possible many types of behavioral, physiological, ecological, taxonomic and limnological 
studies that could be accomplished only with great difficulty at other locations. 

CENTER FOR COMMUNICATIONS AND SIGNAL PROCESSING 

In 1982 NCSU was selected as a site for an industry/university/government cooperative 
research center for communications and signal processing. The National Science Founda- 
tion awarded the University a five-year grant totaling $650,000 to be used in conjunction 
with company membership fees to begin operation of the Center. As of July, 1989, the 
Center had the following industrial members: AIRMICS, AT&T, Bell South, Carolina 
Power and Light Company, Digital Equipment Corp., Eastman Kodak, General Electric, 
International Business Machines, Northern Telecom/BNR, Westinghouse Electric Corp. 
The mission of the Center is to perform research in the development of tools and methodolo- 
gies in communications and signal processing with tangible relevance to industrial needs 
and with significant academic content. In addition to providing useful research services to 
industrial participants, the Center enhances the education of graduate students by provid- 
ing them with practical and relevant research topics and the means for carrying out this 
research. 

CENTER FOR SOUND AND VIBRATION 

The Center for Sound and Vibration, established in 1969 and administered within the 
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, is composed of faculty pursuing 
the solution of a wide variety of problems such as occur in machinery and aircraft design 
particularly related to vibration and sound. Graduate programs exist at M.S. and Ph.D. 
levels in fields such as noise and vibration control, aeroacoustics, hearing conservation, 
computer-aided machinery design, active control of vibration and sound, and signal pro- 
cessing. Outstanding experimental facilities, which include large anechoic and reverber- 
ant rooms and computer graphics equipment, are available. The Center's programs are 
financed largely by grants and contracts from industry and federal and state agencies. 

COUNSELING LABORATORY 

The Department of Counselor Education maintains a special counseling facility on the 
fifth floor of Poe Hall. The laboratory is staffed by professionally trained graduate students 
under the supervision of departmental faculty. The major emphasis is on helping a wide 
variety of persons who face educational, career and personal decisions through short-term 
counseling and advising. Occupational exploration and aptitude testing are often included. 
A minimal fee ($10.00) is charged. Appointments are available during the fall and spring 
semesters. 



50 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

DIAGNOSTIC TEACHING CLINIC 

The Diagnostic Teaching Clinic is operated by the graduate program in special education 
within the College of Education and Psychology for the purposes of providing graduate 
students with opportunities to gain both observational and applied clinical experience in 
diagnosing and teaching handicapped children of all ages. The clinic accepts referrals from 
local school systems and from nonpublic school agencies, and the students and staff evaluate 
the referred children, develop educational programs for them in conjunction with the 
referring agency and demonstrate teaching techniques for the benefit of those persons who 
will work with the children. This clinic is open during the day, late afternoon and early 
evening hours during the fall and spring semesters and throughout the summer months 
and is utilized by graduate students from several departments with allied curricula in 
education and psychology. 

ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH CENTER 

The Electric Power Research Center is a university/industry cooperative research center 
recently established within the NCSU College of Engineering. The Center is funded by the 
University and sponsoring organizations from the various sectors of the electric utility and 
power industry. The purpose of the Center is to engage in collaborative efforts aimed at 
enhancing the excellence of research and graduate-level degree programs in electric power 
systems engineering. This primary purpose is accomplished by providing support for 
interested faculty and students to be involved in basic and applied research directly 
relevant to the needs of the multifaceted electric power industry. Motivation to work with 
the Center derives from the close university/industry interaction, the leverage afforded to 
an industrial sponsor's membership dues and the enhanced professional and research 
opportunities provided to faculty and students in electric power engineering. 

While the current research program involves faculty from the Department of Electrical 
and Computer Engineering and the Department of Nuclear Engineering, the Center will 
facilitate access to all the various resources of the University and for all sectors of the 
electric power industry. 

ELECTRON MICROSCOPE FACILITIES 

There are four electron microscope facilities at NCSU available to graduate students and 
faculty for research purposes. The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (C ALS) Center 
for Electron Microscopy is located in Gardner Hall, the Engineering Research Microscope 
Facility is in Burlington Engineering Labs and the Department of Wood and Paper Science 
Electron Microscopy Lab is in Biltmore Hall. The new College of Veterinary Medicine 
(CVM) Electron Microscopy Laboratory is located in the NCSU College of Veterinary 
Medicine on Hillsborough Street. 

The C ALS Center for Electron Microscopy offers complete service support in all areas 
of Biological Electron Microscopy. The Center has two scanning microscopes: a Philips 
505T and a JEOLT-200 and four transmission electron microscopes: an Hitachi HS-8-B, an 
Hitachi HU-ll-B, a JEOL 100-S and a Philips 400T-STEM equipped with a C-400-M 
computer control system. The Center is also equipped with all of the necessary biological 
preparatory equipment. 

Formal instruction is provided through the biological sciences curriculum for transmis- 
sion electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and ultramicrotomy. Advanced 
techniques are provided on an individual basis or through workshops. 

The Engineering Research Analytical Instrument Facility ( AIF) is equipped with 9 
Hitachi scanning transmission (model H-800) and scanning electron (model S-530) micro- 
scopes, both equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometers (Tractor Northern TN 
2000 and TN 5500). In addition, an ETEC autoscan SEM with full options is maintained. 

The H-800 STEM has a maximum accelerating voltage of 200 kV and a lanthanum 
hexaboride gun, providing high image brightness and penetration with minimal specimen 
damage, which is used for ceramic, metallurgical, electronic and textile materials. Compu- 
ter control of all lenses and a motorized 45-degree double-tilting stage make it easy to use, 
and a high takeoff angle X-ray detector provides high sensitivity elementary analysis, 
including mapping and quantitative capability. The instrument operates in scanning, 
transmission and STEM modes with full diffraction capability. 



I THE GRADUATE CATALOG 51 

The S-530 SEM accommodates large (6-inch) specimens, has an ultra-low voltage mode 
for uncoated surface examination and has highly automated focus and picture-taking 
controls for routine high-quality images. In addition to 50-angstrom resolution secondary 
electron pictures, the microscope is equipped with a high-resolution backscattered electron 
detector and a computerized quantitative X-ray spectrometer and EBIC and EBIV 
systems. 

All microscopes are supported by complete specimen preparation and darkroom facili- 
ties and an extensive computerized image processing, analysis and measurement system. 
The analytical instruments center also operates an electron probe microanalyzer (AMR/3) 
for wavelength dispersive X-ray analysis on the micrometer level, several light micro- 
scopes and X-ray dif f ractometers, and an Auger electron spectrometer with ion sputtering 
which allows depth profiling of elemental composition. 

A scanning Auger microprobe (JEOL JAMP 30) adds monolayer surface analyzing 
capabilities. This systems features a complete analytical SEM with full automation and an 
Auger electron spectrometer system for qualitative and quantitative surface analysis. The 
system also features electron channeling capabilities. 

In addition, an ion probe microanalyzer (Cameca IMS 3f) performs secondary ion mass 
spectrometry (SIMS) with sub-micron lateral resolution and atomic layer depth resolution 
and typical detection limits in the ppm-ppb range. Both oxygen and cesium ion sources are 
available and a digital imaging system is used to interpret the three-dimensional elemental 
distributions. The instrument is used particularly for engineering, electronic and biologi- 
cal materials. 

Center personnel teach regular courses covering many of these instrument techniques as 
well as short courses and offer collaboration with and instruction for graduate students on 
an individual basis. 

The Department of Wood and Paper Science Microscopy Lab is equipped with a 
Siemens Elmskop-IA transmission electron microscope as well as all other equipment 
necessary for the preparation and study of specimens. Instruction for graduate students 
engaged in research is on an individual need basis. 

The CVM Electron Microscopy Laboratory is a facility housing a Philips 410 trans- 
mission electron microscope for biological specimens and a JOEL JSM-35 scanning elec- 
tron microscope. All the back-up equipment for preparing specimens to be viewed with 
either instrument are housed within the Laboratory as well as complete darkroom facilities 
for the preparation of routine and publication material. A course covering biological 
scanning and transmission electron microscopy is offered yearly. The Laboratory also 
offers complete electron microscopy service support to those users desiring it. 

HIGHLANDS BIOLOGICAL STATION 

North Carolina State University is an institutional member of the Highlands Biological 
Foundation which provides support for the Highlands Biological Station of the University 
of North Carolina. This is an inland biological field station located at Highlands, North 
Carolina. The town of Highlands is in the heart of the Southern Appalachians at an 
elevation of 3,823 feet. The area has an extremely diverse biota and the highest rainfall in 
the eastern United States. 

Facilities are available throughout the year for pre-and post-doctoral research in botany, 
zoology, soils and geology. The laboratory building with research rooms and cubicles and 
the library are well equipped for field-oriented research. Also, five cottages and a dining 
hall are located on the edge of a six-acre lake. In addition to 16 acres surrounding the lake, 
the station owns several tracts of undisturbed forested land available for research. 
Research grants available through the Station provide stipends for room, board and 
research expenses. 

INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 
INSTITUTE 

The Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute was established at North 
Carolina State University in 1984 to provide interdisciplinary educational, research and 
technology transfer program in manufacturing systems engineering. The objectives of this 
program are to educate engineers in the theory and practice of integrated manufacturing 



52 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

systems technology; to conduct basic and applied research on topics in cooperation with 
industry on problems of contemporary manufacturing system; and to engage in technology 
transfer with industry. 

Central to all aspects of the Institute's operation and activity is in the integration of 
computer-aided processes in the design and control of manufacturing facilities. Through 
both internally and externally funded research projects the Institute contributes to the 
solution of generic design and manufacturing engineering problems and provides a vehicle 
for technology transfer. 

MATERIALS RESEARCH CENTER 

The Materials Research Center was established in 1984 at NCSU as an interdisciplinary 
program involving persons representing the Department of Chemistry, Electrical and 
Computer Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering and Physics. The present 
thrust area of the Center concerning thin films and coatings serves as a focal point for this 
cooperative research. The experimental efforts are conducted within the four departments 
noted above. 

MICROELECTRONICS CENTER OF NORTH CAROLINA 

North Carolina State University is a participating member of the Microelectronics 
Center of North Carolina (MCNC) which provides support for the academic and research 
programs in microelectronics in North Carolina. Other participating institutions are the 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University, North Carolina Agricultu- 
ral and Technical State University, the Research Triangle Institute and the University of 
North Carolina at Charlotte. 

Faculty and students at NCSU have access to the use of MCNC facilities on sponsored 
research projects and for formal academic courses including microelectronics design and 
fabrication laboratories. Areas of interest include systems design, systems engineering, 
integrated circuit fabrication technology, semiconductor materials and device physics. 
Departments at NCSU which are actively involved in the program include Electrical and 
Computer Engineering, Computer Science, Physics, Chemistry and Materials Science and 
Engineering. 

NUCLEAR REACTOR PROGRAM FACILITIES 

The Nuclear Reactor Program provides specialized nuclear facilities to the educational, 
industrial and governmental organizations of North Carolina for the purposes of teaching, 
research and service. The Program facilities include (i) the PULSTAR, a 1-megawatt 
research and training nuclear reactor with unique neutron irradiation capabilities, (ii) an 
analytical laboratory featuring neutron activation analysis and radioisotope production 
and measurement and (iii) a thermal-hydraulics laboratory which has developed a freon 
loop to simulate the operation of a pressurized water reactor. The Nuclear Reactor Pro- 
gram is associated with the Department of Nuclear Engineering and is located in the 
Burlington Engineering Laboratories on campus. 

ORGANIZATION FOR TROPICAL STUDIES 

North Carolina State University is an institutional member of the Organization for 
Tropical Studies (GTS), a consortium of North and Central American universities which 
maintains field research and teaching facilities in Costa Rica. Each year OTS offers a series 
of courses that are open to NCSU graduate students including tropical biology, agroecol- 
ogy, agroforestry and tropical agricultural biology. These 8-week courses, offered in winter 
and summer, are taught in Costa Rica and make use of a network of OTS field stations 
located throughout the country. 

The OTS facilities in Costa Rica also provide a unique opportunity for tropical research 
by NCSU graduate students and faculty. The principal field station, located in the nor- 
theastern Atlantic lowlands, has excellent laboratory and housing facilities and provides 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 53 

access to a 3,500-acre tract owned by OTS. Another station is located at mid-elevation in 
southeastern Costa Rica near the Panamanian border. OTS also utilizes various other sites, 
including a seasonally dry area in the northwestern part of the country and a high-elevation 
area at 10,000 feet in the Talamanca range. More information about OTS may be obtained 
through the International Programs Office. 

PESTICIDE RESIDUE RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory is a facility in the College of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences devoted to research on pesticide residues in animals, plants, soils, water and 
other entities of man's environment. Although the laboratory is administered through the 
Department of Entomology, it serves the total needs of the College in cooperative research 
projects requiring assistance on pesticide residue analysis. 

The laboratory functions as a focal point for residue research involving interdepartmen- 
tal cooperation, but faculty in the laboratory also conduct independent pesticide research 
on persistence and decomposition in soils and plants, absorption and translocation in plants, 
distribution in environment and contamination of streams, estuaries and ground water. 

The laboratory is equipped with the latest analytical instruments. Graduate study can be 
undertaken in any aspect of pesticide residues either in the Pesticide Residue Research 
Laboratory or in one of the cooperating departments. 

PRECISION ENGINEERING CENTER 

The Precision Engineering Center was established with a $1.25 million grant from the 
Office of Naval Research in 1982. The goal is to develop techniques for precision manufac- 
turing at tolerances below those attainable with current technology. For example, fabrica- 
tion of electro-optical devices require manufacturing tolerances better than 1 millionth of 
an inch. This goal requires new methods for monitoring and controlling the parts being 
produced or the process being performed. Specific research objectives involve the study of 
metrology systems, control algorithms, machine structural dynamics, optics, materials, 
and microprocessors and the details of many different fabrication processes. An interdisci- 
plinary team of faculty from Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Materials Science 
and Engineering, Computer Science and Physics along with research staff and graduate 
students are working together to address these research areas. 

In 1985 the program was expanded with industrial and national laboratory support and 
in 1986, the program was funded under the University Research Initiative program at 
ONR for one million dollars a year for five years. These organizations foresee the need for 
scientists and engineers with a background in precision engineering as well as new technol- 
ogy to meet their growing demands for high-precision products. With this expanded base of 
support, the Precision Engineering Center is fulfilling these needs. 

PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL CLINIC AND LABORATORIES 

The Department of Psychology operates the Psycho-Educational Clinic located in Poe 
Hall. The clinic provides both a service to the public and training for school psychology 
graduate students. School-age child assessment and program development are the major 
services provided. Coordination of internships and practica is also administered through 
this facility. 

Each graduate program in psychology also has laboratory facilities, either independ- 
ently or shared. Thus, the experimental psychology program has laboratories for neuropsy- 
chology, auditory and visual perception, cognition and operant behavior. There is also a 
training and development laboratory as well as facilities for ergonomics, applied develop- 
mental psychology, human resource development, industrial/organizational and voca- 
tional psychology and social psychology. The latter facilities include one-way viewing 
rooms with recording equipment. 



54 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The Reproductive Physiology Research Laboratory administered through the Depart- 
ment of Animal Science includes environmental control rooms designed to provide constant 
levels of air temperature, humidity and light for animals involved in studies on reproduc- 
tion. Facilities and equipment are available for surgery, in vitro growth of embryos, isotope 
labeling in embryo metabolism and transfer of embryos between females. 

Support for research at both the master's and the doctoral levels is available. Students 
may elect a comparative approach to a specific problem in mammalian reproduction, 
working with several species, or they may choose to work with a single species. Generally 
students select a problem associated with the identification of factors influencing early 
prenatal development, the endocrine control of ovarian function or some aspect of elucida- 
tion and control of aberrations in mammalian reproduction. 

Cooperative research is possible between the laboratory, the College of Veterinary Medi- 
cine and the Medical School or the Environmental Health Sciences Center at the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for those students desiring a broader training in the 
general area of reproductive physiology. 

Students whose work is concentrated in reproductive physiology can major in either 
animal science or physiology with a minor in related disciplines. 

SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM 

The University of North Carolina Sea Grant College Program is a state/federal partner- 
ship program involving all campuses of the UNC system. A majority of its activities, 
however, are conducted at the NCSU campus. Sea Grant combines the University's exper- 
tise in research, extension and education to focus on practical solutions to problems in the 
area of coastal and marine resource use and conservation. Graduate and undergraduate 
research opportunities rest with individual project directors on campus and a special 
fellowship program administered through the program office. 

SOUTHEASTERN PLANT ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORIES 
PHYTOTRON 

The Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratory, often referred to as the North Carol- 
ina State University Phytotron, is especially designed for research dealing with the 
response of plants and microorganisms to their environment. A high degree of environmen- 
tal control makes possible simulation of a wide range of climates found in tropical, temper- 
ate and northern zones. 

Research in the Phytotron deals with all phases of plant biology. Although the majority of 
the studies are conducted with agricultural crop species, the Phytotron can accommodate 
ecological investigations, plant biology problems of the space program, experimental 
taxonomy and air pollution studies as well as basic physiological and biochemical research. 

The Phytotron facility is available to the resident research staff, participants in graduate 
research programs of North Carolina State University and to domestic and foreign visiting 
scientists. 

TRIANGLE UNIVERSITIES NUCLEAR LABORATORY 

TUNL is a laboratory for nuclear structure research. Located on the campus of Duke 
University in Durham, the laboratory is staffed by faculty members and graduate students 
in the Departments of Physics of Duke University, the University of North Carolina at 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 55 

Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University. Particle accelerators are used to bom- 
bard target nuclei with an assortment of ions of accurately controlled energy spread and 
spin orientation. The accelerators are a 15 MeV tandem Van de Graaff accelerator and a 4 
MeV Van de Graaff accelerator. Polarized and pulsed beams are available as well as a new 
polarized target. On-line computers are used for data collection and analysis. 

Physicists from NCSU are partners in the operation of the laboratory. There is extensive 
collaboration with personnel from the other two participating universities and with the 
many visiting physicists from the United States and abroad. 



Special Programs 

INTERNATIONAL AREA STUDIES GROUPS 

The International Area Studies Groups, comprised of faculty from across the university 
with common interests in an international studies area, provide a forum for sharing 
professional experiences; generating and identifying support sources for collaborative 
scholarly activities; offering seminars for the university; providing a public-service func- 
tion for the campus and community at large by identifying faculty with expertise in their 
study area; interacting with visiting scholars and students from the geographic area 
specific to the study group; and serving an advisory role in institutional linkage develop- 
ment between NCSU and universities in the study area. 

RESEARCH PROGRAM AT THE OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED 
UNIVERSITIES 

North Carolina State University is a member of the Council of Sponsoring Institutions of 
Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), a not-for-profit consortium of 49 colleges and 
universities and a management and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of 
Energy (DOE) with principle offices located in Oak Ridge, TN. Founded in 1946, ORAU 
identifies and helps solve problems in science, engineering, technology, medicine, and 
human resources and conducts research and educational programs in energy, health and 
the environment for DOE, ORAU's member institutions, other colleges and universities, 
and other private and governmental organizations. 

ORAU manages competitive programs to bring students at all levels, precollege through 
postgraduate, as well as faculty members, into federal and private research laboratories 
and selects recipients of fellowships and research grants. Many programs in ORAU's 
various divisions are also open to participation by qualified students and faculty with short, 
specialized courses in nuclear-related fields being of particular interest. 

The ORAU Laboratory Graduate Participation Programs enable graduate students in 
life, physical and social sciences, mathematics, or engineering, who have completed all 
degree requirements except thesis or dissertation research, to perform full-time thesis or 
dissertation research under the joint direction of the major professor and a DOE staff 
member at a participating site. Stipends vary but usually include adequate living allow- 
ance, tuition and fees. 

Information is available from NCSU's representative on the ORAU Council of Sponsor- 
ing Institutions, Dr. F. D. Hart, or by writing University Programs Division, P. 0. Box 1 17, 
Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117. 



56 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

UNIVERSITY PATENT AND COPYRIGHT 
PROCEDURES 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to teaching, research and extending knowl- 
edge to the public. 

It is the policy of the University to carry out its scholarly work in an open and free 
atmosphere and to publish results obtained therefrom freely, limited only by a short time 
delay in cases in which this is necessary to prepare and file applications. Patentable 
inventions sometimes arise out of the research activities of its faculty, staff and students 
which are carried out wholly or in part with University facilities. As a public service 
institution, the University has an interest in assuring the utilization of such inventions for 
the public good. Protection must be provided for at least some of these inventions through 
patents and the licensing thereof to encourage their development and marketing. Patents 
and their exploitation, however, represent only a small part of the benefits accruing from 
either publicly or privately sponsored research. 

A portion of the research conducted by the University is supported by government and a 
portion by private industry. Service to the public, including private industry, is an integral 
part of the University's mission. As a public institution, the University, in its agreements 
with private industry or other private organizations, must keep the interests of the general 
public in view. The rights and privileges set forth in cooperative agreements or contracts, 
with respect to patents and copyrights developed as a result of research partly or wholly 
financed by private parties, must be fair and just to the inventor(s), the sponsor and the 
public. Research should be undertaken by the University under support from private 
parties only if it is consistent with and complementary to the University's goals and 
responsibilities to the public. 

SECTION 100-Purposes: 

The North Carolina State University Patent and Copyright Procedures are designed to 
implement the Patent and Copyright Policies of The University of North Carolina. The 
procedures incorporate the interests of the faculty, staff, and students, the institution, and 
the sponsors of research, because in many cases those interests are congruent in desiring to 
encourage innovation and assure broad dissemination of the results of research. These 
procedures are designed to stimulate and recognize creativity among the faculty, staff, and 
students, and to establish an institutional process that is flexible enough to accommodate 
the different types of research and patentable work conducted at a comprehensive research 
university such as NCSU. Equity and fairness are goals of the procedures in all respects, 
not only in the distribution of royalty, but also in recognition. Finally, these procedures 
should provide an efficient and timely mechanism for reaching a decision about patenting 
with a minimum involvement of the inventor's time so that he or she may continue to be 
productive in the laboratory and classroom. To this end the University employs a patents 
administrator whose duties include providing assistance to faculty, staff and students in 
matters related to inventions. 

SECTION 200— Ownership: 

1. As defined by the Patent and Copyright Policies of the Board of Governors of The 
University of North Carolina, to which these Procedures are expressly subject. North 
Carolina State University has an interest in all inventions of University personnel, includ- 
ing students, that are conceived or first actually reduced to practice as a part of or as a result 
of: (a) University research; (b) activities within the scope of the inventor's employment by, 
or official association with, the University; and (c) activities involving the use of University 
time, facilities, staff, materials. University information not available to the public, or funds 
administered by the University. 

2. Faculty, staff, and students, whose inventions are made on their own time, outside the 
scope of their employment or association with the University and without University 
facilities, materials, or resources and which inventions are, therefore, their exclusive 
property as specified by the Patent and Copyright Policies, may submit their invention to 
the University for possible patenting and/or commercial exploitation and management 
under terms to be agreed upon by the inventor and the University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 57 

3. The provisions of the NCSU Patent Procedures are subject to any applicable laws, 
regulations or specific provisions of the grants or contracts which govern the rights in 
inventions made in connection with sponsored research. 

4. Under the terms of certain contracts and agreements between NCSU and various 
agencies of government, private and public corporations, and private interests, NCSU is or 
may be required to assign or license all patent rights to the contracting party. NCSU 
retains the right to enter into such agreements whenever such action is considered to be 
both in its best interest and in the public interest. Ordinarily, the University will not agree 
to grant rights in future inventions to private corporations or businesses except as set forth 
in these procedures. 

5. All faculty, staff and students engaged in University related or sponsored research 
shall sign a Patent Agreement. 

6. Students who are pursuing only non-research related studies shall not be obligated to 
sign an NCSU Patent Agreement. However, if the student should make an invention which 
is, or may be, subject to University ownership in accordance with the Patent and Copyright 
Policies, the student shall disclose the invention to the University as provided under these 
Procedures and the University, together with the student, shall determine an equitable 
resolution of ownership rights. 

SECTION 300— Responsibilities of NCSU Personnel: 

1. NCSU personnel who, either alone or in association with others, make an invention in 
which NCSU has or may have an interest shall disclose such inventions to the Vice 
Chancellor for Research. The Vice Chancellor for Research will promptly acknowledge 
receipt of disclosures and will distribute the disclosures to the Intellectual Property Com- 
mittee for consideration at its next meeting. 

2. For any invention in which the University has an interest, the inventor, upon request of 
the Vice Chancellor for Research shall execute promptly all contracts, assignments, waiv- 
ers or other legal documents necessary to vest in the University or its assignees any or all 
rights to the invention, including complete assignment of any patents or patent applications 
relating to the invention. 

3. NCSU personnel may not: (a) sign patent agreements with outside persons or organiza- 
tions that may abrogate the University's rights and interests either as stated in the Patent 
Policies or as provided in any grant or contract funding the research which led in whole or 
in part to making the invention, nor (b) without prior authorization, use the name of the 
University or any of its units in connection with any invention in which the University has 
an interest. 

4. All faculty teaching courses in which students do work that may lead to patentable 
inventions should inform the students of the existence of the NCSU Patent and Copyright 
Policies and of these Procedures. 

SECTION 400— Suggested Procedures For Record-Keeping: 

1 . U.S. patent practice places a premium on witnessed records when two or more parties 
claim the same invention. The date the idea occurred (the "conception") and the date it was 
put into practice form ("reduced to practice") are vital. Equally important in the eyes of the 
U.S. Patent Office is the "diligence" shown by contending inventors. They must prove that 
they regularly pursued work on the invention, documenting their efforts on a day-by-day 
basis. The intent of U.S. patent laws is to recognize the first inventor; the one who originated 
the idea. Under these laws, the first to conceive and reduce to practice will receive a patent 
if his records bear out his claims; the first to conceive and the last to reduce to practice may 
win if his records show diligence. 

2. The careful recording of ideas and laboratory data is a matter of routine for industrial 
researchers. Each entry is complete and up-to-date, signed and witnessed; a legal record of 
the day's work. Record-keeping is not nearly so simple for the academic investigator, for he 
or she may work at odd hours or on weekends; may be closeted in a laboratory, an office or at 
home; and often lacks easy accessibility to suitable witnesses. Still, the keeping of a 
witnessed laboratory notebook is advisable. Additionally, such records can serve as valua- 
ble repositories of new ideas. 



58 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SECTION 500— The Handling of a Disclosure: 

1. When faculty or staff members make an invention, it shall be their responsibility to 
discuss their discovery or invention with the Department Head at which time the possibility 
of exploring patenting should be considered. Students should first discuss an invention with 
their instructor, who shall assist them in further discussion within the University. The 
patents administrator is available to discuss possible inventions and to assist faculty, staff 
and students in the preparation of disclosures. If the invention appears to be a matter that 
should be considered for patenting, the inventor(s) should prepare a disclosure utilizing 
guidelines for invention disclosures which can be obtained for the patents administrator. 
The Department Head should transmit the disclosure through the Dean of his School to the 
Vice Chancellor for Research for consideration by the Intellectual Property Committee. 

2. Upon receiving a disclosure, the Chairman of the Intellectual Property Committee may 
refer the disclosure to one of several technical advisory committees to the Intellectual 
Property Committee. Technical advisory committees will be appointed by the Vice Chan- 
cellor for Research and will be composed of faculty and staff who are knowledgable and 
experienced in broad disciplinary or cross-disciplinary areas. These individuals will be 
asked to review the disclosure from the point of view of whether or not, based on their 
knowledge, they believe the invention, if patented, would be a strong, viable, commercial 
product that would have a large market. The technical advisory committee in each area will 
meet prior to each Intellectual Property Committee meeting if they have any disclosures 
presented to them, and will discuss the disclosures and make to the Intellectual Property 
Committee, prior to its meeting, one of the following recommendations: 

A. That the disclosure has significant commercial possibilities. 

B. That the disclosure does not appear to have significant commercial possibilities. 

C. That the technical advisory committee could not determine, based on its knowledge, 
whether or not the disclosure has significant commercial possibilities. 

3. The Intellectual Property Committee will review each written disclosure promptly. 
The inventor or a representative shall be allowed to examine all written materials submit- 
ted to the Committee in connection with the disclosure and to make a written and oral 
presentation to the Committee. The Committee will decide on a disposition of the invention 
to secure the interests of the University, the inventor, the sponsor, if any, and the public. Its 
decision may include, but is not limited to, one or a combination of the following: 

A. To submit the disclosure for review by a patent or invention management firm or 
agent; 

B. To make inquiries of potential licensees that may have an interest in the invention, 
including the financing of a patent application, where applicable; 

C. To conduct a patent search concerning the patentability of the disclosure; 

D. To apply for a patent with University resources (an option with limited application 
because of financial constraints); 

E. To release University rights to the inventor subject to an agreement to protect the 
interests of the University, the sponsor, if any, and the public, including an obligation to pay 
to the University a percentage of future royalties or profits in cases where it is necessary to 
recognize the University's contribution; 

F. To dedicate the invention to the public; 

G. To waive further University interest in the invention. 

4. Normally, within four weeks of the receipt of the disclosure, the inventor will be 
notified in writing of the decision of the Committee on (a) the equities involved including 
financial participation, (b) whether the University plans to file a patent application, or (c) 
whether the University will accept assignment of the invention for patenting, licensing 
and/or commercial handling as applicable. If the University chooses not to file a patent 
application for an invention in which it has rights, or not to license the invention, or not to 
dedicate it to the public, upon the inventor's written request the invention, at the Commit- 
tee's discretion, may be released in writing to the inventor, with the permission of the 
sponsor, if any. 

5. In those cases in which the University has obtained a patent without obligation to 
sponsors, if no arrangement has been made for commercial development within five years 
from the date of the issuance of the patent, the inventor(s) may request in writing an 
assignment of the University's patent rights. The Intellectual Property Committee will 
promptly either grant the request or advise the inventor of the University's plans for the 
development of the invention. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 59 

SECTION 600— Royalty: 

1. NCSU shall share with the inventors revenue it receives from patents or inventions. As 
noted in Section 200 (4), specific provisions of grants or contracts may govern rights and 
revenue distribution regarding inventions made in connection with sponsored research; 
consequently, revenues the University receives from such inventions may be exclusive of 
payments of royalty shares to sponsors or contractors. 

2. The gross royalty revenues (net amount received by the University if there is a specific 
agreement in a grant or contract with a sponsor) generated by a patent or invention shall be 
the basis upon which the inventor's royalty is calculated. Unless otherwise agreed, the 
inventor's share of royalty revenues shall be 25% of the gross revenue. In the case of 
co-inventors, the 25% of gross revenue shall be subdivided equally among them, unless the 
inventors, with the concurrence of the Intellectual Property Committee, determine a 
different share to be appropriate. Applicable laws, regulations or provisions of grants or 
contracts may, however, require that a lesser share be paid to the inventor. In no event shall 
the share payable to the inventor or inventors in the aggregate by the University be less 
than 15% of gross royalties received by the University. 

3. To the extent practicable and consistent with State and University budget policies, the 
remaining revenue received by the University on account of an invention will first be 
applied to reimburse the University for expenses incurred by it in obtaining and maintain- 
ing patents and/or in marketing, licensing and defending patents or licensable inventions 
and the remainder will be dedicated to research purposes that may include research in the 
inventor's department or unit, if approved by the Chancellor upon recommendation of the 
Intellectual Property Committee. 

SECTION 700— Inventor Requests for Waiver of University Rights: 

1. If an inventor believes that the invention was made outside the general scope of his or 
her University duties, and if the inventor does not choose to assign the rights in the 
invention to the University, he or she shall, in the invention disclosure, request that the 
Intellectual Property Committee determine the respective rights of the University and the 
inventor in the invention and shall also include information on the following points: 

A. The circumstances under which the invention was made and developed; 

B. The employee's official duties at the time of the making of the invention; 

C. The inventor's intention to request an acknowledgment that the University has no 
claim if such request is deemed appropriate; 

D. The extent to which the inventor is willing voluntarily to assign domestic and foreign 
rights in the invention to the University if it should be determined that an assignment of the 
invention to the University is not required under the Patent and Copyright Policies; 

E. The inventor's intention to request that the University prosecute a patent application if 
it should be determined that an assignment of the invention to the University is not required 
under the Patent and Copyright Policies. 

SECTION 800-Publicaticn and Public Use 

1. North Carolina State University strongly encourages scholarly publication of the 
results of research by faculty and students. Though the Patent and Copyright Policies do 
not limit the right to publish, except for short periods of time necessary to protect patent 
rights, publication or public use of an invention constitutes a statutory bar to the granting of 
a United States patent for the invention unless a patent application is filed within one year 
of the date of such publication or public use. Publication or public use also can be an 
immediate bar to patentability in certain foreign countries. 

2. In order to preserve rights in unpatented inventions, it shall be the duty of the inventor, 
or of his or her supervisor if the inventor is not available to make such report, to report 
immediately to the Vice Chancellor for Research any publication, submission of manu- 
script for publication, sale, public use, or plans for sale or public use, of an invention, if a 
disclosure has previously been filed. If an invention is disclosed to any person who is not 
employed by the University or working in cooperation with the University upon that 
invention, a record shall be kept of the date and extent of the disclosure, the name and 
address of the person to whom the disclosure was made, and the purpose of the disclosure. 



60 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

After disclosure to the Intellectual Property Committee, the inventor shall immediately 
notify the Vice Chancellor for Research of the acceptance for publication of any manuscript 
describing the invention or of any sale or public use made or planned by the inventor. 

SECTION 900— Contractural Arrangements: 

1. North Carolina State University will follow Federal Regulations with respect to 
election of title in contracts and grants with Federal agencies. 

2. The University normally reserves the right to ownership of patents on inventions 
arising out of research supported in whole or in part by grants or contracts with non- 
governmental organizations or firms. Contracts or agreements which are entered into 
between the University and such organizations or agencies should contain clauses setting 
forth such a reservation unless deviations therefrom are requested by the sponsor and 
approved by the Vice Chancellor for Research. In the interest of fair treatment to the 
sponsor in consideration for an investment and in the interest of discharging the Universi- 
ty's obligation to the public in the application of its facilities and employee time and talent, 
special provisions may be negotiated by the Vice Chancellor for Research in such non- 
government sponsored contracts on options such as the following: 

A. The University will retain rights to patents arising out of such sponsored research but, 
if a significant portion of the research costs are borne by the sponsor, including direct costs, 
the sponsor may be assured a non-exclusive, non-assignable license at a most favorable 
royalty rate for the use of the patent. 

B. Other patent licensing alternatives may be negotiated in the research contract based 
on factors which will promote effective and expeditious transfer of the technology. 
Research sponsors are encouraged to seek guidance from the Office of the Vice Chancellor 
for Research. 

C. In order to protect the potential patent interests of both parties in such contracts in 
which the sponsor is accorded patent rights, the following procedure may be specified: 

"When in the course of the sponsored research project the investigator or investigators 
conceive or reduce to practice some discovery which appears to be patentable, then the 
inventor(s) will immediately inform the sponsors and the University of such discovery and 
will, for a specified period as negotiated (normally three months but in any case not more 
than twelve months), make available to the sponsor all pertinent information and disclo- 
sures which may be required for the development of an appropriate patent application. 
During this period, the investigators agree not to disclose this material to the public and 
agree to cooperate in the sponsor's effort to secure the patent. At the end of this agreed 
period, the investigators and the University will be free to proceed with publications and 
making public such other documents as they may choose. With the exception of the above 
mentioned agreed period, the University will operate industry sponsored contracts in the 
normal manner with no other special considerations being given to the sponsor. Under no 
circumstances will the sponsor have the right to prevent the publication of material or 
information derived during the conduct of the program or as a result thereof other than for 
the agreed period indicated above." 

Prior written agreement of the investigators involved in research investigations to be 
carried out under these conditions must be secured by the University to enable the Univer- 
sity to discharge its agreed obligations under such a contract. 

SECTION 1000— Patent Management and Administration: 

1. North Carolina State University recognizes that the evaluation of inventions and 
discoveries and the administration, development and processing of patents and licensable 
inventions involves substantial time and expense and requires talents and experience not 
ordinarily found among its faculty and staff; therefore, it employs the Director, Office of 
Technology Administration to provide assistance. The University may contract with out- 
side agents for certain services. It may enter into a contract or contracts with an outside 
organization covering specific inventions or discoveries believed to be patentable and 
patents developed therefrom or covering all such inventions, discoveries and patents in 
which the University has an interest. The University may manage an invention using its 
own resources. 

2. The Chancellor shall appoint a Intellectual Property Committee consisting of no fewer 
than three members. The Vice Chancellor for Research shall serve as Chairman of the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 61 

Committee. The Committee shall review and recommend to the Chancellor or the Chancel- 
lor's delegate changes in these Procedures, decide upon appropriate disposition of inven- 
tion disclosures, resolve questions of invention ownership, recommend to the Chancellor the 
expenditure of invention royalties, and make such recommendations as are deemed 
appropriate to encourage disclosures and to assure prompt and effective handling, evalua- 
tion, and prosecution of invention opportunities and to protect the interests of the Univer- 
sity and the public. The Director of the Office of Technology Administration shall serve as 
staff for the Committee and shall attend all meetings. 

SECTION 1100— Copyright Procedures: 

1. As a general rule, all rights to copyrightable material are the property of the author. 
The distribution or royalties, if any, is a matter of arrangement between the author and his 
or her publishers or licensees. Different treatment may be accorded by the University in 
case of specific contracts providing for an exception, in cases where the University or 
sponsor may employ personnel for the purpose of producing a specific work, where differ- 
ent treatment is deemed necessary to reflect the contribution of the institution to the work, 
as in the case of software or audiovisual material, or where a sponsored agreement requires 
otherwise. All agreements concerning copyright ownership should be in writing and should 
be signed by the parties and approved by the Vice Chancellor for Research prior to the 
commencement of the work. 

2. An institute, center, or other unit of the University that is itself a publisher and that 
engages faculty members and other employees to write for publication by that unit as a part 
of their professional duty or produce other copyrightable materials, such as audiovisual 
materials or computer software, may, subject to the approval of the Vice Chancellor for 
Research, adopt rules providing that copyright on materials prepared by such faculty 
members and other employees in the course of their professional work for that unit vests in 
the University and not in the author. 

3. Guidelines and procedures for determining faculty, staff and student ownership of 
computer software were adopted by the NCSU Board of Trustees, effective July 1, 1987, 
and are available under separate cover from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research 
or the Office of Technology Administration. 

POLICY ON ILLEGAL DRUGS 

The following policy on illegal drugs was adopted by the North Carolina State University 
Board of Trustees on April 16, 1988: 

PURPOSE 

Reflecting its concern over the threat which illegal drugs constitute to higher education 
communities, the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina adopted a policy 
on illegal drugs on January 15, 1988. The Board of Governors' policy requires each constitu- 
ent institution's Board of Trustees to develop a policy on illegal drugs applicable to all 
students, faculty members, administrators, and other employees. The policy for each 
campus must address particular circumstances and needs while being fully consistent with 
specified minimum requirements for enforcement and penalties. 

To assist North Carolina State University in its continuing efforts to meet the threat of 
illegal drugs, and to comply with the Board of Governors' policy, the Board of Trustees 
adopts the policy set forth below. This policy is intended to demonstrate the University's 
primary commitment to education, counseling, rehabilitation, and elimination of illegal 
drugs, as well as its determination to impose penalties in the event of violation of state and 
federal drug laws consistent with aJl due process protection rights. 

EDUCATION, COUNSELING AND REHABILITATION 

North Carolina State University shall maintain a program of education designed to help 
all members of the University community avoid involvement with illegal drugs. The 
educational program shall emphasize the incompatibility of the use or sale of illegal drugs 
with the goals of the University, the legal consequences of involvement with illegal drugs. 



62 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

the medical and psychological implications of the use of illegal drugs, and the ways in which 
illegal drugs jeopardize an individual's present accomplishments and future opportunities. 
Specific elements of the education program are: 

1. Publicizing the University's policy in the StudentCodeof Conduct, the undergraduate 
and graduate catalogs, and other publications distributed to students, faculty, adminis- 
trators, and other employees. The latter publications include the official bulletin, the 
Student Handbook, the Faculty Handbook, the Advisers' Handbook, and the Human 
Resources newsletter. 

2. Continuing and expanding the drug education program conducted by Student Health 
Service. 

3. Continuing development of courses on drug education. 

4. Continuing the drug education component of the employees' Wellness Program. 

5. Increasing the awareness and utilization of the University's Employee Assistance 
Program (EAP). 

The University shall disseminate information about drug counseling and rehabilitation 
services that are available to members of the University community. Persons who voluntar- 
ily avail themselves of such services shall be assured that applicable professional standards 
of confidentiality will be observed and that such participation will not be the basis for 
disciplinary action. Specific counseling and rehabilitation efforts include: 

1. Continuing the evaluation and referral services of the Counseling Center for out- 
patient and in-patient rehabilitation. 

2. Continuing the consultation and evaluation portions of the Student Health Service's 
drug education program. 

3. Utilizing the Employee Assistance Program's referral to existing community-based 
counseling and rehabilitation services. 

ENFORCEMENT AND PENALTIES 

Students, faculty members, administrators, and other employees are responsible, as 
citizens, for knowing about and complying with the provisions of North Carolina law that 
make it a crime to possess, sell, deliver, or manufacture those drugs designated collectively 
as "controlled substances" in Article 5 of Chapter 90 of the North Carolina General Statutes. 
The University will initiate its own disciplinary proceding against a student, faculty 
member, administrator, or other employee when the offense is deemed to affect the inter- 
ests of the University. Penalties will be imposed by the University in accordance with 
procedural safeguards applicable to disciplinary actions against students, faculty mem- 
bers, administrators, and other employees, as required by Section 502D (3) and Section 603 
of the University Code, by Board of Governors' policies applicable to other employees 
exempt from the State Personnel Act, and by regulations of the State Personnel Commis- 
sion. The penalties to be imposed by the University may range from written warnings with 
probationary status to expulsions from enrollment and discharges from employment. 
However, the following minimum penalties, as prescribed by the Board of Governors, shall 
be imposed for the particular offenses described. 

Trafficking in Illegal Drugs 

1. For the illegal manufacture, sale or delivery, or possession with intent to manufac- 
ture, sell or deliver, of any controlled substance identified in Schedule 1, N.C. General 
Statutes 90-89. or Schedule 11, N.C. General Statutes 90-90 (including, but not limited 
to, heroin, mescaline, lysergic acid diethylsmide, opium, cocaine, amphetamine, 
methoqualine), any student shall be expelled and any faculty member, administrator 
or other employee shall be discharged.- 

2. For a first offense involving the illegal manufacture, sale or delivery, or possession 
with intent to manufacture, sell or deliver, of any controlled substance identified in 
Schedules III through VI, N.C. General Statutes 90-91 through 90-94 (including, but 
not limited to, marijuana, phenobarbital, codeine), the minimum penalty shall be 
suspension from enrollment or from employment for a period of at least one semester or 
its equivalent.* For a second offense, any student shall be expelled and any faculty 
member, administrator, or other employee shall be discharged. 

•Employees subject to the State Personnel Act are governed by regulations of the State Personnel Commission. Because 
the minimum penalty specified in this section and required by the Board of Governors exceeds the maximum period of 
suspension without pay that is permitted by the State Personnel Commission regulations, the penalty for a first offense for 
employees subject to the State Personnel Act is discharge. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 63 

Illegal Possession of Drugs 

1. For a first offense involving the illegal possession of any controlled substance 
identified in Schedule I, N. C. General Statutes 90-89, or Schedule II, N.C. General 
Statutes 90-90, the minimum penalty shall be suspension from enrollment or from 
employment for a period of at least one semester or its equivalent.* 

2. For a first offense involving the illegal possession of any controlled substance 
identified in Schedules III through VI, N.C. General Statutes 90-91 through 90-94, the 
minimum penalty shall be probation, for a period to be determined on a case-by-case 
basis. A person on probation must agree to participate in a drug education and 
counseling program, consent to regular drug testing, and accept such other conditions 
and restrictions, including a program of community service, as the Chancellor or the 
Chancellor's designee deems appropriate. Refusal or failure to abide by the terms of 
probation shall result in suspension from enrollment or from employment for any 
unexpired balance of the prescribed period of probation. 

3. For second or other subsequent offenses involving the illegal possession of controlled 
substance, progressively more severe penalties shall be imposed, including expulsion 
of students and discharge of faculty members, administrators or other employees. 

SUSPENSION PENDING FINAL DISPOSITION 

When a student, faculty member, administrator, or other employee has been charged by 
the University with a violation of policies concerning illegal drugs, he or she may be 
suspended from enrollment or employment before initiation or completion of regular 
disciplinary proceedings if, assuming the truth of the charges, the Chancellor or, in the 
Chancellor's absence, the Chancellor's designee concludes that the person's continued 
presence within the University community would constitute a clear and immediate danger 
to the health or welfare of other members of the University community; provided, that if 
such a suspension is imposed, an appropriate hearing of the charges against the suspended 
person shall be held as promptly as possible thereafter. 

COORDINATOR OF DRUG EDUCATION 

The University Counsel will serve as coordinator of drug education and, acting under the 
authority of the Chancellor, will be responsible for overseeing all action and programs 
relating to this institutional policy. 

IMPLEMENTATION AND REPORTING 

This North Carolina State University policy on illegal drugs shall be effective on the 
beginning of the fall semester of 1988. 

Annually the Chancellor shall submit to the Board of Trustees a report on campus 
activities related to illegal drugs for the preceding year. The report shall include, as a 
minimum, the following: (1) a listing of the major education activities conducted during the 
year; (2) a report on any illegal drug-related incidents, including any sanctions imposed; (3) 
an assessment by the Chancellor of the effectiveness of the campus program; and (4) any 
proposed changes in the policy on illegal drugs. A copy of the report shall be provided to the 
President. 




FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

The course descriptions are planned for the academic years 1989-1990 and 
1990-1991, unless indicated otherwise. Some listed courses may not be taught, 
however, if registration for a course is insufficient, or if faculty or facilities are 
not available. 

Consent of the department is required for all practicum and individual special 
topics or special problems courses as well as internships and thesis or dissertation 
research. In a typical course description, the semester hours of credit, the 
number of actual lecture and laboratory hours of meeting per week and the term 
or terms in which the course is offered are shown in this manner: 2(1-2) F,S,Sum. 
or 1-3 F,S,Sum. 

In the first example, the "2" indicates the number of semester hours credit 
given for satisfactory completion of the course. The "(1-2)" indicates that the 
course meets for one hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory work each week. 
In the second example, the "1-3" indicates that a maximum of three and a 
minimum of one semester hours' credit can be earned. This is to be arranged with 
the instructor. The "F" designates that the course is to be given in the fall 
semester. Likewise, the "S" designates spring and the "Sum.," summer. 



ABBREVIATIONS USED IN COURSE LISTINGS 

Abbreviations used in the course listings are: 
alt. yrs., alternate years 
CI, consent of instructor 
coreq., corequisite 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 65 

grad. standing, admitted to the Graduate School 

hrs., hours 

jr., junior 

lab., laboratory 

lect., lecture 

PBS, Post-baccalaureate Studies status 

preq., prerequisite 

sr., senior 

undergrad., undergraduate. 
Courses at the 600 level are not ordinarily open to undergraduates, although 
occasional exceptions are made for senior honor students. 
For 400-level course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Catalog. 

Adult and Community College Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E.J. Boone, Head 

Professor R. W. Shearon, Associate Head and Graduate Administrator 

Professors: G. L. Carter Jr., J. C. Glass Jr., R. D. Mustian; Extension Professor: D. 
R. Proctor; Prof essors Emeriti: M. P. Burt, W. L. Carpenter, G. Hyatt Jr., M. S. 
Knowles; Associate Professors: A. Fingeret, R. T. Liles, L. I. Rendon, T. A. 
Tollefson; Visiting Associate Professors: G. J. Andrews, P. Meyer; Associate 
Professors Emeriti: W. L. Gragg, E. E. White; Assistant Professor: S. A. J. 
Colin III; Adjunct Assistant Professors: R. A. Berlam, E. S. Knott, R. J. 
Plummer 

The Department of Adult and Community College Education is administered 
by the Colleges of Education and Psychology and Agriculture and Life Sciences. 
Program offerings lead to the Master of Science, Master of Education and Doctor 
of Education degrees. The program is directed toward administrators, supervi- 
sors, programmers, staff development officers, and instructors in community 
colleges, extension systems, adult and continuing education in higher education 
and the professions, and other adult education organizations. 

The interdisciplinary curriculum focuses on acquiring an integrated concep- 
tual and theoretical framework, derived from the behavioral and social sciences 
and education, and developing abilities to plan, administer and effect viable and 
relevant educational programs of change with learner systems in both formal 
and nonformal contexts. Opportunities are provided to bridge the gap between 
theory and hands-on practice. 

Each student's study program is individualized. Programs of study may be 
developed within an area(s) of scholarship alone, or with a focus on a professional 
field of application. The areas of scholarship include (1) history, philosophy and 
foundations of adult and community college education, (2) administration/organ- 
ization development, (3) programming/evaluation and accountability, (4) learn- 
ing/instruction and (5) systematic inquiry/research. While a student must be 
competent in all five areas, a focus may be developed in one or more of the areas. 



66 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Professional specialization is offered in either community college education, or 
extension education, or adult and continuing education, with several areas of 
concentration: (1) community college administration, (2) community college 
instruction, (3) extension administration, (4) extension programming, (5) inter- 
national extension education, (6) educational gerontology, (7) continuing profes- 
sional education and (8) education for special adult populations (literacy educa- 
tion, developmental studies). The M.S. and M.Ed, programs require a minimum 
of 30 or 36 credit hours, respectively. The Ed.D. program requires extensive 
research work and may include participation in a supervised internship expe- 
rience. The doctoral program must be completed within seven years from the 
date of admission. One academic year of full-time residency is required. In 
addition to Graduate School admission requirements, the department may 
require recent GRE scores (verbal and quantitative), the Miller Analogies Test, a 
writing test, a narrative statement that describes the applicant's career objec- 
tives and specific objectives for enrolling in the program, and interviews by the 
ACCE Admissions (Committee and other Graduate Faculty members. 

For descriptions of the adult and community college education courses listed 
below, see education. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

ED 478 Extension as Non-formal Education. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or PBS. 
3(3-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 Community College and Two-year Postsecondary Education, 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and Community College Education. 

3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 505 Group Process in Adult and Community College Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, Contemporary Nature. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education. 3(3-0) 
F,Sum. 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education. 3(3-0) 
F. 

ED 539 Educational Gerontology. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 543 Adulthood and Learning: The Later Years. 3(3-0) Alt. S. 

ED 549 Finance in Adult and Community College Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 559 The Adult Learner. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 567 Education of Special Adult Populations. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

ED 579 Concepts and Principles of Evaluation Applied to Non-formal Adult Educa- 
tion. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 585 Qualitative Research in Adult and Community College Education. 3(3-0) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 67 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College Education. Credits 
Arranged. F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. 3(S-0) F,Sum. 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. 3(3-0) S,Suin. 

ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education. 1-3. F,S. 

Agricultural Communications 

AC 590 Special Topics in Agricultural Communications. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing. 
1-6. Special Topics may be selected for study in the theoretical approaches to communica- 
tions problems or experimental investigation with instructor guidance. Graduate Staff 

Agricultural Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see education. 

Air Conservation 

The air conservation faculty includes some 50 faculty members representing 
20 departments in four schools. It is the intent of this faculty and the associated 
program to provide training for students in the many disciplines related to air 
conservation. Such areas as air sampling, biological effects, air-quality man- 
agement, sources, meteorology, law and economics and business are all impor- 
tant aspects covered by course offerings and research projects. 

A graduate student desiring to minor in air conservation will have on his or her 
committee a member of the air conservation faculty from outside the individual's 
major department, representing this minor field. While there are no restrictions 
on the major, students minoring in air conservation should have a strong back- 
ground in the life sciences, the physical sciences or engineering. The minor 
program will normally consist of 9 or more credits for the master's degree, 15 or 
more for the doctorate. 

A variety of courses bearing on different aspects of the air conservation prob- 
lem may be taken on this campus, at UNC-Chapel Hill or at Duke. The listing 
below shows relevant courses available at North Carolina State University. For 
courses at Duke and Chapel Hill see the appropriate catalogs. 

Air Pollutants and Their Sources 

CE 576 Atmospheric Pollution. 

Meteorology and Pollutant Transport 

MEA 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. 

MEA 556 Air Pollution Meteorology. 

MEA 627 Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion. 



68 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Air Sampling and Analysis 

ST 51 1 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences I. 

ST 515 Experimental Statistics for Engineers. 

CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. 

Effects on Human, Animal and Plant Receptors 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation and Photogrammetry. 
TOX 515 Environmental Toxicology. 
BO 561 Physiological Ecology. 

Air Quality Management 

MAE 409 Particulate Control in Industrial Atmospheric Pollution. 
WPS 525 Pollution Abatement in Forest Products Industries. 
MAE 570 Theory of Particulate Collection in Air Pollution Control. 

Air Quality Law and Institutions 

UNI 495 Special Topics in University Studies (Environment and Law). 
PA 511 Public Administration. 

Air Conservation Economics 

EB 401 Economic Analysis for Non-Majors. 
OR 501 Introduction to Operations Research. 
EB 515 Environmental and Resource Policy. 

Communications concerning the air conservation program, including in- 
quiries from students wishing to minor in air conservation, should be directed to 
the Chairman, Air Conservation Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, 
P.O. Box 7905, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 
27695-7905. 

Animal Science 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. S. Bull, Head 

Associate Professor K. L. Esbenshade, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: J. H. Britt, K. R. Butcher, E. V. Caruolo, A. J. Clawson, D. G. 
Davenport, E.J. Eisen, R. W. Harvey, W. L. Johnson, E. E. Jones, J. R. Jones, J. 
G. Lecce. C. L. Markert, B. T. McDaniel, B. R. Poulton, A. H. Rakes, H. A. 
Ramsey, 0. W. Robison, F. D. Sargent, J. C. Wilk; Extension Professor: D. P. 
Wesen; Professors Emeriti: E. R. Barrick, R. F. Behlow, L. Goode, C. A. 
Lassiter, J. M. Leatherwood, J. E. Legates, R. D. Mochrie, R. M. Myers, I. D. 
Porterfield. F. H. Smith, L. C. Ulberg. G. H. Wise; Associate Professors: M. T. 
Coffey, W. J. Croom Jr.. R. L. McCraw, R. M. Fetters, K. R. Pond, J. W. Spears, 
L. W. Whitlow; Associate Professors Emeriti: E. U. Dillard, J. J. McNeill; 
Assistant Professors: J. D. Armstrong, W. L. Flowers, S. P. Washburn 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 69 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professor (USDA): J. C. Burns; Associate Professors: W. M. Hagler, Jr., M. D. 
Whitacre 

The Department of Animal Science offers programs of graduate study leading 
to the Master of Agriculture, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. Animal science offers an opportunity for training in a diversity of basic 
sciences and the integration of such knowledge into the framework of a living 
system. Students may major not only in animal science but also in any one of the 
following disciplines: biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, nutrition and physi- 
ology. Animal science majors may specialize in one or more of these basic disci- 
plines or in the more applied areas of management and production. The animal 
science major provides for the student who prefers a multidisciplinary approach. 
Majors in a basic discipline are not only educated in it but have the added 
capability of integrating such knowledge into a living system, i.e., the domestic 
animal. Minors can be obtained in any of the disciplines listed or in a variety of 
other areas. 

Modern laboratories, specialized equipment and many different species of 
animals are available as research tools. A program of course work and a research 
project are developed for each student in accord with one's educational objectives. 
The primary goal is to provide the student with a challenging opportunity to 
develop his or her creative ability so that it may contribute significantly to a 
chosen discipline. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology. Preq.: ZO U21. 3(2-3) F. 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management. Preq.: ANS 20i. 3(2-3) S. 

ANS 403 Swine Management. Preq.: ANS 20A. 3(2-3) F. 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management. Preq.: ANS 20A. 3(2-3) S. 

ANS 405 Lactation. Preq.: BS 100. 3(2-3) S. 

ANS 406 Sheep Management. Preq.: ANS 20U. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. 

ANS 410 Horse Science. Preq.: ANS 310 or CI. 3(2-2) S. 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of Domestic Animals. Preq.: GNill. 3(3-0) F. 

ANS (PO, NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition. Preq.: CH 220 (xr both 221 and 223. 3(3-0) 
F. 

ANS (NTR) 419 Human Nutrition in Health and Disease. Preqs.:ANS(NTR, PO) U15 
or FS WO, BCH J,51. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANS 500 Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. Preq.: ANS 20It orANSUlS. 3(3-0) Sum. Alt. 
yrs. Advanced concepts in ruminant nutrition for the practicing agricultural professional. 
Protein, energy, vitamin and mineral nutrition in relationship to the nutritional needs and 



70 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

practical feeding of beef cattle, dairy cattle, sheep and goats. New developments in feeding 
systems, feed additives and the prevention and treatment of metabolic disorders. 

Pond. Croom, Whitlow 

ANS (PHY) 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. Preq.: ZO Jk21. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasis placed on discussions of mechanisms which control the reproductive processes. 
Mechanisms which are species-limited compared with those shared by all species. Current 
knowledge of some subsystems investigated in detail while others referred to in reviews of 
well-documented research findings. Britt, Fetters 

ANS (GN) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement. Preqs.: GN ill, ST 511. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasis placed on the utilization of basic principles of population and quantitative 
genetics in animal improvement. Factors affecting genie and genotypic frequencies and 
methods of estimating genetic and nongenetic variance, heritabilities and breeding values 
presented. The roles of mating systems and selection procedures in producing superior 
genetic populations examined. Robison 

ANS 510 Advanced Livestock Management. Preq.: ANS If02 or ANS U03 or ANS hOU. 
3(3-0) S. An advanced study of beef cattle, dairy cattle and swine management practices 
with particular emphasis on input-output relationships and the consequences of alternative 
management decisions. Problem. (Offered on-campus in even-numbered years.) 

Davenport 

ANS (NTH) 516A,B.C,D Animal Nutrition Research Methods, i-^ S. (See nutrition.) 

ANS 520 Tropical Livestock Production. Preq.: Six hrs. of ANS at WO level. 3(3-0) F. 
Modern principles of feeding, genetics, forage production and management applied to 
improvement of meat and dairy animals in tropical, subtropical and high-altitude envir- 
onments. Considers biological and socio-economic constraints to development of livestock 
industry. Discussion of climatic effects on production applied to U. S. conditions and to 
developing tropical countries. Johnson 

ANS (NTR) 540 Ruminant Physiology and Metabolism. Preqs.: BCH USl or 551, ZO 
Jt21. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Detailed discussion of the ruminant digestive system, its dependent 
microbial fermentation and the unique aspects of ruminant tissue metabolism. Emphasis 
given to the understanding of the interdependent relationship between the rumen microb- 
ial fermentation and the host animal's physiology and metabolism. The effects of changes in 
diet and physiological state and their relationship to various digestive and metabolic 
dysfunctions discussed. Croom 

ANS (PHY) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. Preqs.: BCH^Sl, ZO Jt21. 3(3-0) 
F. Alt. yrs. Detailed discussion of the mammalian endocrine system with emphasis on the 
functional aspect, chemistry and mode of action of specific hormones secreted from major 
endocrine glands. Modern biochemical and physiological principles of hormonal integra- 
tions and neuroendocrine integration examined. Graduate Staff 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science. Credits arranged. Max. 6 F,S. Special 
problems selected or assigned in various phases of animal science. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ANS (GN) 603 Population Genetics in Animal Improvement. Preqs.: ST 512, GN 506. 
3(3-0) F. A study of the forces influencing gene frequencies, inbreeding and its effects, and 
alternative breeding plans. Eisen 

ANS (NTR, PO) 605 Mineral Metabolism. Preqs.: ANS (NTR, PO) A15 or BCH 551, 
BCH Jt51 and Z0Jf21. 3(3-0) F. Requirements, function, distribution, absorption, excretion 
and toxicity of minerals in humans and domestic animals. Interactions between minerals 
and other factors affecting mineral metabolism or availability. Emphasis on mechanisms 
associated with mineral functions and the metabolic bases for the development of signs of 
deficiency. Spears 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 71 

ANS 606 Animal Biotechnology: Embryo Manipulation. Preq.:ANS 502. U(l-8) F. Alt. 
yrs. Advanced training and experience in mammalian embryo manipulation including 
techniques of superovulation and embryo recovery, in vitro culture, parthenogenetic acti- 
vation, in vitro fertilization, embryo transfer, embryo aggregation and DNA micro- 
injection. Fetters 

ANS 699 Research in Animal Science. Credits Arranged. F,S. A maximum of six hours 
allowed toward the master's degree; no limitation on credits in doctorate program. 

Graduate Staff 

Anthropology 

For anthropology courses, see sociology and anthropology. 

Architecture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. P. Burns Jr., Program Director 

Associate Professor J. P. Rand, Assistant Program Director 

Professors: P. Batchelor, G. Bizios, R. H. Clark, C. E. McKinney, M. Pause, G. J. 
P. Reuer, H. Sanoff, V. F. Shogren, E. W. Taylor; Professors Emeriti: G. L. 
Bireline Jr., J. H. Cox, H. H. Harris, H. L. Kamphoefner, D. R. Stuart; Asso- 
ciate Professors: F. C. Harmon, J. W. Place, L. W. Sanders, J. 0. Tector, P. 
Tesar; Visiting Associate Professor: E. F. Harris Jr.; Associate Professor Eme- 
ritus: D. W. Barnes Jr.; Assistant Professor: F. A. Rifki; Adjunct Lecturer: T. C. 
Howard 

The Master of Architecture program prepares students to assume responsible 
professional roles in architecture. Learning goals for students in the program 
include 1) developing exceptional competence in architectural design, 2) build- 
ing a base of knowledge and skills necessary for professional activity, 3) develop- 
ing a commitment to professional values and responsibilities, 4) discovering the 
variety of career roles in practice and related fields, and 5) developing as auto- 
nomous individuals, willing to assume responsibility for a lifetime of intellectual 
and creative growth. 

Students encounter architectural problems at a variety of scales requiring 
analytic, conceptual and developmental abilities. The design studio is the focus of 
this activity, enabling students to test ideas and theories about design in the 
context of both "real life" and idealized problems. The final studio is devoted to a 
self-initiated, detailed architectural project that is carried out under the guid- 
ance of the student's graduate advisory committee. 

Other course work supplements and amplifies these experiences. A rich 
variety of courses is available within the Architecture Department in urban and 
community design, architectural conservation, management, professional prac- 
tice and building technology. A distinctive characteristic of the program is its 
context within the School of Design, which offers the additional perspectives of 
landscape architecture, product design and visual design. Course work may also 



72 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

be taken throughout North Carolina State University and at nearby University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University. The program's flexible 
curriculum offers the student considerable freedom to individualize his or her 
plan of study, based on personal, educational and professional goals. 

The Master of Architecture is a first professional degree accredited by the 
National Architectural Accrediting Board. As such, it satisfies educational 
requirements for professional licensure and certification established by the var- 
ious states and the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards. The 
department also offers a parallel 4+1 Bachelor of Architecture program which 
provides similar professional qualification. 

The majority of recent graduates have chosen to enter private architectural 
practice, undertaking the rich professional challenges it offers. While acknowl- 
edging the primacy of the practice orientation, the Master of Architecture pro- 
gram enlarges the professional framework to include alternative, nontraditional 
career roles as well. 

Students are encouraged to exercise initiative and responsibility in realizing 
their personal educational goals. Student independence is seen as instrumental in 
helping to shape not only decision-making capabilities but future leadership 
potential as well. 

The Department of Architecture offers three tracks to the Master of Architec- 
ture degree. Track 1 is for applicants with a four-year undergraduate degree in 
architecture and may be completed in two years of full-time study. Track 2 is for 
applicants holding a five-year NAAB-accredited Bachelor of Architecture 
degree and normally requires three semesters in residence. Track 3 is for stu- 
dents with degrees in fields other than architecture. This normally requires four 
semesters of preparatory work before entering the final two-year program of 
graduate study. Some applicants with design-related academic or professional 
experience may be able to complete the preparatory work in less than four 
semester; each case is evaluated individually. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

ARC 400 Architectural Design. Preq.: DF 102. 6(0-9) F. 

ARC 402 Architectural Design: History. Preqs.: ARC 302, ARC 400, ARC UU ARC 
U9U. 6(0-9) S. 

ARC 403 Pre-Graduate Architectural Design (Series). Track 3 M.Arch. students only. 
Maximum of 2 If hours 6(0-12) F,S. 

ARC 412 Environmental Control Systems and Site Design. Preq.: ARC 211. 3(3-0) S. 

ARC 441 History of Contemporary Architecture. Preq.: Jr. standing or DN HI, H2. 
3(3-0) F. 

ARC 447 Ideas in American Architecture I: 1865-1893. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. 

ARC 448 Ideas in American Architecture II: 1893-1918. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. 

ARC 449 Urban Form and Structure. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 73 

ARC 451 Illumination and Design. Preq.: ARC 253. 3(2-2) S. Alt. yrs. 

ARC 452 Environmental Control Systems and Design. Preq.: ARC 253. 3(2-2) S. Alt. 
yrs. 

ARC 457 Architectural Construction Systems. Preq.: DN 25U. 3(2-3) S. 

ARC 494 Practicum in Architecture. Preqs.: Jr. standing in Architecture; 3.0 or better 
GPA: u'ritten approval ofdept. head. 3-6 CH. 

ARC 495 Independent Study in Architecture. Preq.: Jr. standing in Architecture; 3.0 
or better GPA; approval ofdept. head. 1-3 CH. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ARC 501 Professional Architecture Studio I. Preqs.: BE DA degree or equivalent and 
CI;Coreq.:ARC 510. 6(0-12) F,S. Design studio investigations aimed at the development of 
an understanding of the major issues confronting the contemporary architect and at the 
expanding of problem solving abilities in architectural design. 

ARC 502 Professional Architecture Studio II. Preqs.: ARC 501; ARC 510 and CI. 

6(0-12) F,S. Design investigations aimed at the development of an understanding of the 
major issues confronting the contemporary architect and at the expanding of problem 
solving abilities in architectural design. This is an individualized, final project studio. 

ARC 521, 522 Advanced Architectural Structures I, II. Preq.: (521) DN 352; (522) 
ARC 521. 3(3-0) F,S. Gravity and non-gravity loads on structures; comparative behavior of 
structural materials; comparative behavior of simple structural systems; approximate and 
exact analysis procedures as applied to systems; principles of approximate and exact 
design in timber, steel and reinforced concrete; architectural/structural/mechanical com- 
patibility in systems; basic principles of foundation analyses and design. 

ARC 531, 532 Advanced Building Technology I, U. Preqs.: DN 253, 25Jt. 2(1-3) F,S. A 
synthesis of studies in building science undertaken in previous courses. Material assem- 
blies in practical applications, dimensional characteristics of mechanical and construction 
systems for buildings, and special projects in selected areas of building science. 

ARC 542 Investigations in Recent World Architecture. Preqs.: Six hrs. architectural 
history /theory and sr. standing. 3(2-1) S. Alt. yrs. A lecture-seminar course intended to 
provide a description and analysis of recent developments in architectural design through 
an examination of projects by many of the world's most important architects. Primary 
emphasis placed on emerging design concepts and theories as expressed in the built 
architecture and the visionary proposals of the past two decades. 

ARC 543 Analysis of Precedent. Preq.: (yrad. standing. 3(0-3) S. Investigation of archi- 
tectural elements, relationships and ordering ideas through comparative graphic analysis 
of buildings designed by architects. Emphasis on buildings as physical artifacts. 

ARC 544 Architectural Conservation. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. in SOD or grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. An examination of the many dimensions of architectural 
conservation and/or preservation as a significant aspect of architectural practice. Histori- 
cal evolution, regulatory and economic factors, technology and pertinent design issues 
explored as foundations for individual case studies by class members of selected adaptive 
use, rehabilitation and restoration projects. 

ARC 546 Theory of Building Types. Preq.: Tivo ARC studios. 3(3-0) F. Typology in its 
theoretical implications and practical applications in architecture. Analysis and documen- 
tation of selected building types in their historical evolution. Graphic identification of type 
characteristics. 



74 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ARC 551 Design Methods and Programming. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F. An 
intensive study of a part of the design process involving the social and behavioral needs of 
the users through disciplined methods of data collection, analysis, organization, communi- 
cation and evaluation. Emphasis upon the role of programming in the environmental 
design field and variety of applications used in the profession. 

ARC 561 The Practice of Architecture.5C5-0; F. A lecture course which examines the 
practice of architecture, with emphasis given to both normative and emerging procedures 
in the private architectural firm. The role and function of the practicing architect, legal 
and regulatory conditions, the nature of professional services, office management and 
project management processes given special attention. 

ARC 562 Project Processes in Architecture. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. A 
course which examines the processes of project delivery in architectural practice from 
initiation to completion of projects. Lectures and case studies of current projects provide the 
means to explore the nature of architectural services involved, the roles of participants and 
the creative and technical issues which must be resolved. 

ARC 570 Theory of VrhainForm. Preq.: Advancedundergrad. 3(3-0)F.Alt. yrs. Theory 
of urban form examines the morphology of cities and their component parts, emphasizing 
the formal properties of urban space and structure. The first part of the course examines 
the descriptive properties of cities, while the second part deals with the analysis of parts of 
cities. 

ARC 571 Urban Housing. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. 3(3-0) S. Interrelationships 
between housing and the form and structure of cities. Housing design as a function of 
economic, public policy, social and technological influences. Emphasis on the physical form 
of housing in the latter half of the twentieth century. 

ARC 573 Environmental Perception. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) S. An intensive 
review of the design research literature that emphasizes people's interaction with the 
physical environment. Various techniques for measuring human response to the environ- 
ment explored to permit students to develop and analyze their own research projects. 

ARC 574 Place and Place Making. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F. A seminar- 
lecture course which examines the definitions, concepts and emergent research findings 
useful in explaining the human sense of place. Particular emphasis upon those physical 
aspects and relationships which influence this sense of place and over which the designer 
has some control. 

ARC 575 Participatory Design in Architecture. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. An examination of the theories and methods pertaining to the participatory design 
process. The course will probe the nature of advocacy design and examine successful 
projects in the U. S. and abroad that define a social role for architects. 

ARC 581 Conceptual Issues in Architecture and Design I. Preq.: Advanced under- 
grad. or grad. standing. 3(0-3) F. An examination of current issues in American and 
Western society and their relation to the activities and goals of architects and designers. 

ARC 582 Conceptual Issues in Architecture and Design II. Preq.: Advanced under- 
grad. or grad. standing. 3(0-3) S. An investigation into issues and values currently held by 
participating students and their relation to an anticipated career in architecture and 
design.. 

ARC 591 Special Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Seminars on subjects of 
current interest in design which are presented by persons not part of the regular faculty. 

ARC 592 Special Topics in Architecture. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 2-3 As needed. 
Topics of current interest offered by faculty in the Department of Architecture. Subjects 
offered under this number normally used to test and develop new courses. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 75 

ARC 595 Independent Study. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 Max. 6. F,S,Sum. Special 
problems and projects in various aspects of architecture developed under the direction of an 
architecture faculty member on a tutorial basis. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ARC 600 Advanced Architectural Design (Series). Preq.: Grad. standing. 6(0-12) F,S. 
Advanced studies in architectural design. Projects deal with various aspects of building 
design, urban design and community design in a comprehensive and integrative manner. 

ARC 691 Advanced Study in Architecture. Preq.: Grad. standing in School of Design. 
1-6 As needed. Investigation of selected problems and projects in architecture of particular 
interest to graduate students under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial basis. 
Credits and content vary to meet the scope of the project proposal. 

ARC 698 Final Project Studio in Architecture. Preq.: 18 hrs. of ARC 600. 6(0-12) F,S. 
Final project for graduate students supervised by members of their graduate advisory 
committee. 

Artificial Intelligence 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: R. E. Funderlic, H. E. Schaffer, A. L. Tharp; Associate Professors: A. 
C. Chao, H. D. Levin, R. C. Luo, W. J. Rasdorf, R. D. Rodman, W. E. Snyder; 
Visiting Associate Professor: J. A. Bowen; Adjunct Associate Professor: M. G. 
Joost; Assistant Professors: D. R. Bahler, E. T. Sanii 

Artificial intelligence is the branch of computer science concerned with 
designing computer systems which exhibit the characteristics normally asso- 
ciated with intelligence in human behavior, such as understanding language, 
learning, reasoning, solving problems, and so on. At NCSU, artificial intelli- 
gence is an interdisciplinary field, with faculty from several departments 
engaged in fundamental research and applications. 

The university offers courses of study leading to a minor in artificial intelli- 
gence as part of the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. This 
option is available to all graduate students except those in computer science, who 
can choose artificial intelligence as an interest area. 

To fulfill the academic requirements for a minor in artificial intelligence, each 
master's student must successfully complete at least three, and each doctoral 
student six, of the courses in the artificial intelligence curriculum. One of the 
courses must be CSC 511, Artificial Intelligence L Other courses offered as part 
of the artificial intelligence curriculum include: CSC 502 Computational Lingu- 
istics; CSC 602 Computational Semantics; CSC 611 Artificial Intelligence II; 
CSC(ECE) 559 Pattern Recognition; ECE(CSC) 659 Computer Vision; CSC 
(ECE.IE) 575 Voice Communication Systems; CSC(ECE,IE) 675 Advances in 
Voice Input/Output Communication Systems; IE 520 Industrial Robotics. There 
is also a range of special topics courses covering subjects such as knowledge 
engineering, fuzzy reasoning, knowledge representation, artificial intelligence 
applications to CAD, and artificial intelligence in manufacturing. Other subjects 
can be added to an individual student's course of study at the discretion of his or 
her committee. 



76 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Graduate students in computer science who select artificial intelligence as an 
interest area are subject to the same academic requirements that define other 
interest areas within computer science. 

Biochemistry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. F. Agris, Head 

Associate Professor: E. S. Maxwell, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: F. B. Armstrong, H. R. Horton, J. S. Kahn, L S. Longmuir, W. L. 
Miller, E. C. Sisler, E. C. Theil; Professor Emeritus: S. B. Tove; Associate 
Professor: J. A. Knopp; Assistant Professor: C. C. Hardin 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: E. E. Jones, R. R. Sederoff, H. E. Swaisgood; Professor Emeritus: L. 
W. Aurand 

Biochemistry applies and extends concepts of chemistry and physics to prob- 
lems in biology. The Department of Biochemistry offers Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The department is currently enlarging its faculty 
and expanding its scope, especially in the area of plant biochemistry. 

A student entering graduate study in biochemistry should have a bachelor's 
degree in biochemistry, chemistry or a related physical or biological science. The 
undergraduate program should have included a minimum of two semesters of 
organic chemistry, two semesters of physical chemistry, one semester of intro- 
ductory biochemistry and one semester of qualitative organic analysis. New 
students take placement examinations in organic and physical chemistry to 
determine their level of competence in these areas. Students who lack under- 
graduate courses considered essential for graduate study in biochemistry may be 
admitted to the graduate program, provided the deficiencies are corrected early 
in their graduate work. 

Courses in general and experimental biochemistry are required as part of 
programs leading to advanced degrees in biochemistry. Other courses in bio- 
chemistry and related areas are required as recommended by the student's 
advisory committee. The student is expected to participate regularly in seminars 
and obtain teaching experience. Completion of a thesis based on original research 
is required for both the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 
Research being conducted with the most modern equipment and in the area of 
macromolecular structure and function includes: the structure, function and 
dynamics of RNAs and DNAs; DNA sequences involved in gene regulation; role 
of hormones in regulation of genes; regulation of iron metabolism; design of 
therapeutic agents against lupus autoantibodies; plant hormone ethylene bind- 
ing to plant cell receptors; corn smut disease genes; protein folding mechanisms; 
and others. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 77 

Prospective students are encouraged to write the department for more 
information. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BCH 540 Proteins. Preq.: BCH JfSl or equivalent. 2(U-0) F. Graduate-level biochemistry 
offered as a series of four 7-week mini-courses (BCH 540, 541, 542, 543; 2 credits each). 
Proteins discussed in terms of their binding and catalytic properties. Secondary and 
tertiary structures that provide these properties explored in detail. (Taught the first 7 
weeks.) Graduate Staff 

BCH 541 Nucleic Acids. Prews.: BCH i51, BCH 5W or equivalents. 2U-0) F. DNA and 
RNA biosynthesis, structure and function discussed. Protein synthesis described as a 
process involving cooperative interactions of many RN As and proteins. (Taught the second 
7 weeks.) Graduate Staff 

BCH 542 Metabolism. Preqs.: BCH Jt51 and BCH 5U0 or equivalents. 2(If-0) S. Interme- 
diary metabolism of carbohydrates, fatty acids and nucleic acids studied in relation to its 
role in supplying energy and metabolic intermediates for cell structure. If BCH 542 is taken 
for credit, BCH 544 cannot be taken for credit. (Taught the first 7 weeks.) 

Graduate Staff 

BCH 543 Biochemical Regulatory Processes. Preqs.: BCH ^51 and BCH 5U0 or equi- 
valents. 2(U-0) S. Lipid metabolism, membrane structure and function. Regulation of 
transcription and translation via hormones or other cellular modulators. (Taught the 
second 7 weeks.) Graduate Staff 

BCH 544 Intermediary Metabolism. Preqs.: BCH U51 and BCH 5^0 or equivalents. 
2(i-0) F. Intermediary metabolism including carbohydrate, lipid, amino acid and nucleo- 
tide biosynthesis. Energy production and substrate/produce regulation featured. This 
course designed to follow BCH 540 and is for students who need training in proteins and 
intermediary metabolism before their second graduate semester. If BCH 544 is taken for 
credit, BCH 542 cannot be taken for credit. (Taught the second 7 weeks.) Graduate Staff 

BCH 552 Experimental Biochemistry. Preqs.: CH 223; CH 31 5 recommended; Preq. or 
Coreq.: BCH 551. 3(1-6) F. An advanced laboratory designed to give students practical 
experiences in purification and quantitative characterization of enzymes and nucleic acids. 
Studies with carbohydrates and membrane lipids also included. Credit may be applied 
toward biotechnology minor. Miller 

BCH (PHY) 553 Physiological Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. Application of 
biochemical methods to the elucidation of the function of whole organisms. A. Biochemistry 
of 1) blood, 2) water, electrolyte, acid-base balance, 3) renal function, 4) muscle metabolism, 
5) central nervous system, 6) autonomic nervous system, 7) endocrine system. B. Biochemis- 
try of adaptation to environment: 1) high and low Pog, 2) hot and cold, 3) wet and dry, 4) 
pollution. Longmuir 

BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology. Preq.: BCH U51 or CI. 2(1-3) Sum. 
Theory and application of radioisotope techniques used in biology. The different modes of 
radioactivity correlated with methods of measurement. Emphasis on use and limitations of 
various instruments and techniques and on their application to research problems. 

Sisler 

BCH 555 Plant Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH 551 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. * The 
basic biochemistry of plants. Basic constituents of plants, their metabolic interrelation- 
ships and their regulation: cell wall structure, carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids, 
lipids, photosynthesis, respiration, secondary plant products, nitrogen metabolism, phytoa- 
lexins and plant hormones. Sisler 

*See department for specific year. 



78 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

BCH (ON) 561 Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. Preqs.: BCH451 or 551, GN UH 
or 505, MB Wl or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. * A study of the development of the fields of 
biochemical and microbial genetics, emphasizing both techniques and concepts currently 
used in molecular research. Includes lectures and discussions of current research 
publications. Armstrong 

BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH U51 or equivalent. Credits 
arranged. Max. 3 F,S,Sum. The study of topics of special interest by small groups of 
students instructed by members of the faculty. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BCH 651 Physical Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. * Structural and 
physical properties of biological macromolecules and the application of spectroscopic 
methods to their study. Knopp 

BCH 652 Structures and Interactions of Biological Macromolecules. Preqs.: BCH 
551, CH U31 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. * Theory and interpretation of physical 
measurements related to structures and interactions of biological macromolecules, 
emphasizing hydrodynamic methods, thermodynamic methods, ligand interactions at 
equilibrium and conformational equilibria. Swaisgood 

BCH 653 Biochemistry of Hormone Action. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. * Well 
defined models of steroid and protein hormone action studied via lectures, assigned read- 
ings and discussions. Students add breadth to the course and depth to their own under- 
standing by searching the literature and writing or lecturing about a particular hormone of 
their own choosing. Miller 

BCH (GN) 658 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function. Preq.: BCH 657. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. * Structure-function relationships of nucleic acids and nucleic acid-protein complexes, 
including the physical biochemistry of nucleotides, polynucleotides, DNA, RNA and pro- 
tein as they relate to the biological processes of replication, transcription and translation. 
Current techniques used to analyze nucleic acid structure and function. Maxwell 

BCH (CH) 659 Natural Products. 3(3-0) F. (See chemistry.) 

BCH 691 Seminar in Biochemistry. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

BCH 692 Laboratory Rotations. Preq.: BCH A51 or equivalent. 1(0-3) F,S,Sum. Bio- 
chemistry students perform highly directed research in one or more laboratories of stu- 
dent's choice prior to beginning thesis research. Each laboratory experience lasts 5 weeks 
and given 1 hr. of credit. No more than 4 credits can be earned under BCH 692. Permission 
of instructor required. Graduate Staff 

BCH 695 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Preq.: (trad, standing in BCH. Credits 
Arranged. F,S,Sum. Critical study of special problems and selected topics of current 
interest in biochemistry and related fields. Graduate Staff 

BCH 699 Biochemical Research. Credits Arranged, F,S,Sum. Graduate Staff 



*See department for specific year. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 79 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor 3. H. Ruff, Head 

Professor R. S. Sowell, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: C. F. Abrams, H. D. Bowen, F. J. Humenik, E. G. Humphries, W. H. 
Johnson, G. J. Kriz, W. F. McClure, R. P. Rohrbach, L. M. Safley Jr., R. W. 
Skaggs, R. E. Sneed, L. F. Stikeleather, C. W. Suggs, P. W. Westerman, D. H. 
Willits, J. H. Young; Professors (USDA): J. W. Dickens, T. B. Whitaker; 
Extension Professor: J. C. Barker; Professors Emeriti: D. H. Howells, F. J. 
Hassler, E. H. Wiser; Associate Professors: G. R. Baughman, C. G. Bowers Jr.; 
Visiting Associate Professor: M. D. Smolen; Assistant Professors: R. W. 
Bottcher, R. L. Hoffman; Senior Researcher: S. C. Mohapatra 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: D. D. Hamann, A. E. Hassan, V. A. Jones, K. R. Swartzel; Assistant 
Professor: T. M. Losordo 

The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering offers programs 
of study for the Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Biological 
and Agricultural Engineering degrees. 

In the Master of Science program emphasis is placed on mathematics and 
theory as the unifying link between otherwise divergent fields of knowledge in 
the biological and physical sciences and as prerequisites to effective engineering 
advances in biological and agricultural areas. As the student acquires compe- 
tence in the advanced methods of science, he or she applies knowledge by conduct- 
ing an original research investigation and by writing and defending a thesis. 

Study for the Doctor of Philosophy degree normally builds on the Master of 
Science program with additional formal study followed by a period of independ- 
ent dissertation research. 

Opportunities for graduate research are available in agricultural engineering 
(power and machinery, soil and water, structures and environment, food and 
process engineering, electrical and electronic systems, and forest mechaniza- 
tion), biological engineering (bioinstrumentation, biomechanics, human engi- 
neering, bioprocessing, food packaging and processing, biological systems 
modeling and aquaculture), environmental engineering (water table manage- 
ment, ground water management, animal waste management and non-point 
source pollution), and knowledge engineering (expert systems, robotics and 
machine vision). 

Current departmental research projects available for graduate student partici- 
pation include instrumentation to measure quality and composition of agricultu- 
ral products, bioengineering properties as related to animal and human medi- 
cine, safety and health of agricultural workers, mechanization and automation of 
horticultural crop production (cucumbers, sweetpotatoes, blueberries and 
grapes), post-harvest processing and storage of agricultural commodities, envir- 



80 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

onmental control of greenhouses, improved systems for field crop production, 
crop response to drainage, total water management for Coastal Plains and Tide- 
water Region soils, hydrologic/water quality modeling of sediment and chemical 
movement, optimum production efficiency of poultry and animal housing sys- 
tems, animal waste as nutrient and energy resources, and expert systems and 
simulation modeling for management decisions. 

For those interested primarily in a broadened background of engineering 
science and technology— without the thesis requirement— the Master of Biologi- 
cal and Agricultural Engineering program permits a wide selection from a 
variety of advanced courses. While this program is primarily for those intending 
to terminate graduate study at the master's level, a student may, with depart- 
mental approval, develop a plan of study under this program which leads to study 
for the doctorate. 

Graduate students have access to modern well-equipped research facilities, 
computing facilities, instrumentation and measurement systems, electronics 
technical support, and mechanical and electronics shops. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery. Preqs.:BAE211, CH 101, PY211 or 221. 3(2-3) 
S. 

BAE 461 Analysis of Agricultural Systems. Preqs.: MA lU or 112, EB 212. 3(2-2) F. 

BAE 462 Functional Design of Field Machines. Preq.: BAE 361; Coreq.: ST 361. 3(2-3) 
S. 

BAE (CHE) 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Preqs.: MA 202 or 212 or 

PY 212 or 208. 3(3-0) S. 

BAE 471 Soil and Water Engineering. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200, MAE 308. M3-2) F. 

BAE 481 Agricultural Structures and Environment. Preqs.: BAE 3U2, MAE 3U. 

M3-3) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 552 Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing. Preqs.: EE 
331, MA 301. 2(1-3) F. Theory and application of primary sensing elements and transduc- 
ers. Generalized performance characteristics and the use of standards. Use of specialized 
measurement systems for agricultural research and processing including an introduction 
to correlation and power spectral density measurements. McClure 

BAE (CE, MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. 3(2-3) S. (See civil engineering.) 

BAE (CE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management. Preq.: (had. or advanced undergrad. 
standing. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. A study of agricultural and associated processing wastes. 
Special laboratory techniques required for the characterization of these wastes emphas- 
ized. Principles and examples considered utilized to develop waste management and 
non-destructive waste utilization systems that are integral to the total operation. Safley 

BAE (FS) 585 Food Rheology. Preqs.: FS 331 or MAE 3 U. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. Principles 
and methods for measuring rheological properties. Theories of elastic, viscous, viscoelastic 
and viscoplastic behavior and relationships to food texture and commodity damage during 
harvest, handling and processing. Influence of time, composition and processing on rheo- 
logical properties. Hamann 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 81 

BAE 590 Special Problems. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing in biological and agricultural 
engineering. Credits Arranged. Each student will select a subject on which to do research 
and write a technical report on the results. The individual may choose a subject pertaining 
to his or her particular interest in any area of study in biological and agricultural 
engineering. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BAE 661 Analysis of Function and Design of Biological and Physical Systems. Preq.: 
CI. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. Mathematical and analytical techniques and principles essential in 
the analysis and design of machines and systems which encompass both the biological and 
the physical domains and their interfaces. Analytical treatment of physical and biological 
systems and the functional analysis of machine components studied to bridge the gap 
between theories and applications. Control systems synthesis and design treated with 
emphasis on quantitative dynamic relations between elements and system response using 
transfer function and computer simulation techniques. Graduate Staff 

BAE (SSC) 671 Theory of Drainage— Saturated Flow.Preg.. MA 301. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Physical concepts and properties of fluids and porous media discussed in relation to 
soil-water movement. The fundamental laws and equations governing saturated flow in 
porous media derived and discussed. Mathematical solutions of steady-state and transient 
flow equations analyzed to determine their applicability to drainage problems. Analogs 
and models of particular drainage problems considered. Skaggs 

BAE (SSC) 674 Theory of Drainage— Unsaturated Flow. Preq.: BAE 671 or equival- 
ent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Forces involved and theories utilized in unsaturated flow of porous 
media discussed in relation to soil-water movement. Steady-state and transient unsatu- 
rated flow equations for horizontal and vertical moisture movement developed and solved. 
The solutions applied to present day laboratory and field technology. Molecular diffusion 
and hydrodynamic dispersion considered in light of current tracing techniques. Skaggs 

BAE 690 Special Topics. Preq.: Grad. standing. l-U. A study of topics in the special fields 
of interest of graduate students under the direction of the graduate faculty. 

Graduate Staff 

BAE 695 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in BAE. 1(1-0) F,S. Elaboration of the subject 
areas, techniques and methods peculiar to professional interest through presentations of 
personal and published works; opportunity for students to present and critically defend 
ideas, concepts and inferences. Discussions to point up analytical solutions and analogies 
between problems in biological and agricultural engineering and other technologies, and to 
present the relationship of biological and agricultural engineering to the socio-economic 
enterprise. Ruff 

BAE 699 Research in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Preq.: Grad. stand- 
ing in BAE. Credits Arranged. Performance of a particular investigation of concern to 
biological and agricultural engineering. The study will begin with the selection of a 
problem and culminate with the presentation of a thesis. Graduate Staff 

Biological Sciences 

Professor C. F. Lytle, Teaching Coordinator 

There is no separate graduate major in the biological sciences, but both Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in several life science 
departments and programs of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Also, 
non-thesis Master of Life Sciences degrees are offered by several departments 
and programs for students who wish to emphasize course work in a graduate 



82 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

program. Master of Life Sciences degrees may be appropriate for students who 
are already working or plan to work in a professional capacity in business, 
industry or government agencies rather than to continue to the doctorate. These 
degrees are not necessarily terminal, however, and successful students may be 
able to proceed to other advanced degrees. 

Several interdisciplinary courses applicable to several graduate programs are 
offered by the Biological Sciences Interdepartmental Program. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

BS 491 Seminar on Professional Development in Biological Sciences. 1(1-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BS 510 Advanced Biology for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Two yrs. of college biology. 
6(Jt-6) Sum. A comprehensive review of important principles and concepts of biology for 
secondary teachers preparing to teach advanced placement biology. Contemporary topics 
in biology emphasized; extensive laboratory and field work are included. Lytle 

BS 590 Special Problems in Biological Instrumentation. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Basic 
components of spectrophotometers including light sources, dispersing devices, detectors 
and read-out methods; theoretical and practical aspects of electron microscopy; basics of 
analog and digital computing methods and applications of computers to biological 
research; methods of separation and identification of bio-polymers; principles of measure- 
ment; the application of electronics in biological measuring and sensing devices; and 
human cytological techniques. Course consists of five-week modules (sections) devoted to 
specific types of instrumentation. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BS 605 Biological Scanning Electron Microscopy. Preq.: Grad. standing with some 
biological background. 2(1-2) S. Theory and application of scanning electron microscopy, 
including specimen preparation, microscope alignment and operation, performance evalua- 
tion, interpretation of problems and darkroom technique. (Limited to 8 students with prior 
approval of instructor.) Mackenzie 

BS 610 Biological Transmission Electron Microscopy. Preq.: Grad. standing with 
some biological background. 3(2-3) F. Theoretical and practical aspects of transmission 
electron microscopy, including microscope alignment and use, performance evaluation, 
interpretation of problems and darkroom techniques. (Limited to 8 students with prior 
approval of instructor.) Mackenzie 

BS 61 1 Ultramicrotomy for Life Sciences. Preqs.: BS 610, grad. standing. 2(1-U) S. An 
intensive laboratory course covering sample preparative techniques for transmission elec- 
tron microscopy, including tissue preparation, thick sectioning, staining and ultramicrot- 
omy. (Limited to 8 students with prior approval of instructor.) Mackenzie 

Biomathematics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. E. Stinner, Director 

Professors: H. J. Gold, K. H. Pollock, H. R. van der Vaart; Adjunct Professor: M. 
W. Anderson; Professor Emeritus: R. J. Monroe; Associate Professors: S. P. 
Ellner, C. E. Smith 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 83 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Professors: J. W. Bishir, T. Johnson, G. Namkoong, L. A. Real, H. E. Schaffer, J. 
F. Selgrade; Assistant Professor: G. G. Wilkerson; Assistant Professor (USDA): 
S. M. Schneider 

Biomathematics is the development and application of mathematical methods 
for the study of biological systems. The focus is the modeling process, which is the 
matching of the biological and physical structure of the system being studied to 
the mathematical description. 

Students pursuing degrees in biomathematics can choose to emphasize (1) the 
development of mathematical modeling methodology as opposed to the applica- 
tion of that methodology, (2) the mathematical sciences, by taking advantage of 
the diverse offering in statistics, mathematics, computer science and operations 
research, or (3) the biological sciences, by fashioning a program which takes 
advantage of the courses offered by individual biological science departments or 
interdepartmental programs such as ecology, physiology, nutrition, wildlife 
biology and toxicology. 

Furthermore, work in biomathematics varies from the study of general biolog- 
ical theory (e.g., population dynamics, feedback regulation in enzyme systems) to 
specific applications (e.g., pollution of a specific river system). Most research has 
both elements. Finally, the modeling of biological systems often requires the 
scholarly resources of several disciplines and thus is characterized by interdisci- 
plinary collaboration. The modeling serves to integrate the contributions of the 
various areas and to provide a means by which the collaborators communicate. 

Applicants to the program are expected to have either a B.S. in biology with 
evidence of aptitude and interest in mathematics or a B.S. in a mathematical area 
with evidence of aptitude and interest in biology. All students are expected to 
have had advanced calculus, linear algebra and general biology. Deficiencies in 
these areas should be remedied during the first year. 

The Biomathematics graduate program is administered as a division within 
the Department of Statistics, with associate faculty drawn from several other 
departments. Further information may be found in the description for the 
Department of Statistics. A brochure is available which describes the bio- 
mathematics degree requirements and research interests of the faculty. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BMA 567 Modeling of Biological Systems. Preq.: MA 112. M3-2) F. Alt. yrs. An intro- 
duction to quantitative modeling in biology. Use of Forrester diagrams, probabilistic and 
deterministic description of dynamic processes, development of model equations, simula- 
tion methods and criteria for model evaluation. Examination of current literature dealing 
with application of models and simulation in biology. Individual and class modeling 
projects. Ellner 

BMA (MA, ST) 571 Biomathematics I. Preq.: Advanced calculus, reasonable back- 
ground in biology or CI. 3(3-0) F. The role of theory construction and model building in the 
development of experimental science. The historical development of mathematical theories 
and models for the growth of one-species populations (logistic and off-shoots), including 
considerations of age distributions (matrix models, Leslie and Lopez; continuous theory, 
renewal equation). Some of the more elementary theories on the growth of organisms (von 
Bertalanffy and others; allometric theories; cultures grown in a chemostat). Mathematical 



84 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

theories of two and more species systems (predator-prey, competition, symbosis; leading up 
to present-day research), and discussion of some similar models for chemical kinetics. Much 
emphasis placed on scrutiny of the biological concepts as well as of the mathematical 
structure of the models in order to uncover both weak and strong points of the models 
discussed. Mathematical treatment of the differential equations in these models stresses 
qualitative and graphical aspects, as well as certain aspects of discretization. Difference 
equation models. van der Vaart 

BMA (MA, ST) 572 Biomathematics II. Preqs.: BMA 571, elementary probability the- 
ory. 3(3-0) S. Continuation of topics of BMA 571. Some more advanced mathematical 
techniques concerning nonlinear differential equations of the types encountered in BMA 
571: several concepts of stability, asymptotic directions, Liapunov functions; different 
time-scales. Comparison of deterministic and stochastic models for several biological prob- 
lems including birth and death processes. Discussion of various other applications of 
mathematics to biology, some recent research. van der Vaart 

BMA (OR, ST) 575 Decision Analytic Modeling. M3-2) F. Alt. yrs. (See statistics.) 

BMA 591 Special Topics. Preq.: CI. Maximum 3. F,S,Sum. Directed readings, problem 
sets, written and oral reports as dictated by need and interest of student; new 500-level 
courses during the developmental phase. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BMA (MA, OR, ST) 610 Stochastic Modeling. Preq.: BMA 572 or ST (MA) 5^2. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. Survey of modeling approaches and analysis methods for data from continuous 
state random processes. Emphasis on differential and difference equations with noisy 
input. Doob-Meyer decomposition of process into its signal and noise components. Exam- 
ples from biological and physical sciences, and engineering. Student project. Smith 

BMA (OR) 611 System Modeling Theory. Preqs.: MA W5; MA U21 or ST It21; linear 
systems (e.g., BMA 572 or IE 522 or OR 531). 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. System concepts and 
modeling processes. Objectives include the following: develop understanding of the model- 
ing process; develop and improve skills in system modeling; provide basis for accessing 
research literature. Topics include: graph theory and system structure; system morphisms 
and representation of system dynamics; sensitivity and model validation; models in scien- 
tific theory compared with decision-related modeling. Examples from a broad spectrum of 
application areas. Gold 

BMA 691 Advanced Special Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S,Sum. Directed readings, prob- 
lem sets, written and oral reports as dictated by need and interest of student; new 600-level 
courses during the development phase (currently includes courses in stochastic modeling 
and biophysical theory). Graduate Staff 

BMA 694 Seminar. Preq.: (Jrad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate students in biomathe- 
matics are expected to attend through most of their residence period. Graduate Staff 

BMA 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Graduate Staff 

Biotechnology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor H. E. Swaisgood, Chairman 

Professors: P. F. Agris, F. B. Armstrong, G. C. Bewley, R. G. Carbonell, H.-m. 
Chang, W. J. Dobrogosz, P. B. Carter, C. K. Hall, B. Hammerberg, H. R. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 85 

Horton, T. W. Joyce, T. R. Klaenhammer, C. S. Levings, C. L. Markert, A. S. 
Michaels, W. L. Miller, R. L. Mott, D. F. Ollis, J. G. Scandalios, R. R. Sederoff, 
J. C. H. Shih, H. E. Swaisgood, C. S. Teng, E. C. Theil, W. F. Thompson; 
Associate Professors: H. V. Amerson, W. F. Boss, E. V. L. DeBuysscher, F. J. 
Fuller, T. Melton, R. M. Fetters, S. L. Spiker, H. T. Stalker, K. G. Tatchell, S. 
Tonkonogy; Associate Professor (USD A): P. E. Bishop; Assistant Professors: M. 
T. Andrews, R. S. Boston, E. F. Bowden, M. A. Conkling, S. E. Curtis, M. E. 
Daub, L. H. Frampton, P. K. Kilpatrick, R. J. Linderman, E. S. Maxwell, D. M. 
Miller, E. S. Miller, P. E. Orndorff, S. M. Peretti, M. A. Qureshi, R. M. Roe, R. 
M. Shuman, R. B. van Breemen; Assistant Professor (USDA): P. H. Sisco 

The Biotechnology Program includes faculty from seventeen departments in 
the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Engineering, Forest Resources, 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and Veterinary Medicine. Graduate study 
leading to a Ph.D. minor in biotechnology may be taken by students who reside 
and conduct their research in one of the participating departments. To obtain a 
minor in biotechnology, the student must successfully complete at least two of the 
laboratory core courses selected from the list below and must conduct graduate 
thesis research in an area of biotechnology. 

Research in biotechnology is focused in three main areas: recombinant DNA 
technology, bioprocessing/bioanalytical techniques, and in vitro culture tech- 
niques. The multidisciplinary nature of biotechnology means that a wide range of 
research topics and techniques are applicable, such as molecular level genetics 
and associated research in molecular biology, enzyme technology and protein 
engineering, bioprocessing using cells or enzymes, development of biosensors, 
hybridoma technology, cell culture techniques and embryo manipulation. 

LIST OF APPROVED COURSES 

ANS 606 Animal Biotechnology: Embryo Manipulation. Preq.: ANS 502. Ul-8)F. Alt. 
yrs. Advanced laboratory course providing training and experience in mammalian embryo 
manipulation including techniques of super ovulation and embryo recovery, in vitro cul- 
ture, parthenogenetic activation, in vitro fertilization, embryo aggregation, and DNA 
microinjection. Fetters 

CS (BO, ON, HS) 547 Cell and Tissue Techniques in Plant Breeding. Preqs.: GN505B 
and GN506B or equivalent. 3(1-Jt) F. Alt. yrs. Applications of tissue culture and cytogenetic 
techniques for plant improvement. Callus and suspension cultures, plant regeneration, in 
vitro selection, haploidy, polploidy, aneuploidy, wide hybridization and embryo rescue. 
Practical lab experiences in tissue culture and cytogenetic techniques. Reed, Stalker 

FS 504 Food Proteins and Enzymes. Preq.: FS U02 or BCH U51. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. An 
advanced course in food chemistry with emphasis on proteins and enzymes of particular 
importance to foods. Protein interactions and their effect on the physical-chemical charac- 
teristics of a product discussed. Particular emphasis given to the preparation and kinetic 
properties of immobilized enzymes and their use as biochemical reactors in processing 
operations or as specific electrodes for analytical purposes. Swaisgood 

GN 666 Laboratory in Molecular Genetics. Preqs.: GN 505 or equivalent and CI. U(2-6) 
S. Alt. yrs. A laboratory course in modern techniques of molecular genetics for advanced 
students. Techniques include in situ hybridization, recombinant DNA methodology, and 
DNA sequencing. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Applications for a place in the course 
may be obtained from the department. Conkling 



86 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MB 660 Experiment3i\Microh\ai\Genetics.Preqs.:BCH561,GNAll,MBi01.M2-6)F. 
Laboratory-oriented presentation of current methodologies and concepts in molecular 
microbial genetics and their application to strain construction, plasmid and phage manipu- 
lations, mutagenesis, cloning and genetic engineering of microorganisms. Melton 

Botany 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E. D. Seneca, Head 

Professors: C. E. Anderson, U. Blum, R. C. Fites, J. W. Hardin, R. L. Mott, W. F. 
Thompson, J. R. Troyer, C. G. Van Dyke, T. R. Wentworth, A. M. Witherspoon; 
Professors (USDA):W . W. Heck, H. E. Pattee, H. Seltmann; Visiting Professor: 
W. S. Chilton; Professors Emeriti: G. R. Noggle, H. T. Scofield, L. A. Whitford; 
Associate Professors: R. L. Beckmann Jr., W. F. Boss, J. M. Stucky, J. F. 
Thomas, T. E. Wynn; Assistant Professors: R. S. Boston, J. M. Burkholder, J. E. 
Mickle; Adjunct Assistant Professor: D. E. Blume 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: A. W. Cooper, R. J. Downs, M. M. Goodman, E. C. Sisler, D. H. 
Timothy; Professor (USDA): S. C. Huber, D. E. Moreland, H. Seltmann; Asso- 
ciate Professors: H. V. Amerson, L. B. Crowder, R. L. Hoffman; Assistant 
Professors (USDA): J. M. Anderson, K. 0. Burkey; Associate Professor 
(USDA): T. W. Rufty Jr. 

The Department of Botany offers programs leading to the Master of Life 
Sciences (non-thesis), Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Excellent physical facilities are available for instruction and research in all 
phases of the departmental program. The Phytotron (part of a two-unit con- 
trolled environment facility operated in collaboration with Duke University) 
offers opportunities for research in experimental taxonomy, ecology, morphol- 
ogy and plant physiology. The department supports a research program in plant 
cell and tissue culture and plant molecular biology. A herbarium supports stu- 
dies in systematic botany, and is augmented by herbaria at nearby Duke Univer- 
sity and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Field laboratories are 
available at the coast, in the Piedmont and in the mountains. 

All graduate students will participate at least one semester during a degree 
program in the departmental instructional program. Graduate students are 
expected to attend and participate in the seminar program every semester they 
are in residence. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

BO 400 Plant Diversity. Preq.: BO 200. M3-3) F. 

BO 403 Systematic Botany. Preq.: BS 100 or 105 or BO 200. U(2-A) S. 

BO 4 L3 Introductory Plant Anatomy. Preq.: BO 200 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 87 

BO (ZO) 414 Cell Biology. Preqs.: CH 223, PY 212, ZO 201 or 203. 3(3-0) S. 

BO 421 Plant Physiology. Preqs.: BS 100 or BS 105 or BO 200 and one year of college 
chemistry. 4(3-3) F,S. 

BO 499 Independent Study in Botany. Preqs.: At least eight hours of Botany, advanced 
standing and presentation of plan of work approved by a faculty member. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 510 Plant Anatomy. Preq.: BO 200. M2-6) F. A study of plant cells, ultrastructure, 
cell types, tissues, organs and patterns of growth and differentiation. Anderson 

BO (CS, HS) 518 Biological Control of Weeds. 1(1-0) F. (See crop science.) 

BO 522 Advanced Morphology and Phylogeny of Seed Plants. Preq.: BO U03. M3-3) F. 
Alt. yrs. A comprehensive survey of the morphology and evolution of angiosperms and 
gymnosperms. Special emphasis is given to vegetative and reproductive morphology of 
fossil and living forms, and to their presumed evolutionary relationships. Hardin 

BO 544 Plant Geography. Preqs.: BO i03, BO (ZO) 360, GNU lor equivalents. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. A course in descriptive and interpretive plant geography, synthesizing data from 
the fields of ecology, genetics, geography, paleobotany and taxonomy. Includes a survey of 
the present distribution of major vegetation types throughout the world, a discussion of the 
history and development of this present pattern of vegetation and a discussion of the 
principles and theories of plant geography. Mickle 

BO (CS, GN, HS) 547 Cell and Tissue Techniques in Plant Breeding. 3(1-4) F. Alt. yrs. 
(See crop science.) 

BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I. Preq.: BO 421 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. The first 
half of a two-semester sequence covering the field of plant physiology. Topics include 
cellular transport, water relations, mineral relations, vascular transport and temperature 
relations. Troyer 

BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preqs.: BO 421 or equivalent and biochemistry. 
3(3-0) S. The second half of a two-semester sequence covering the field of plant physiology. 
Topics include respiration, photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, growth and development. 

Boss 

BO 554 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preq. orcoreq.: BO 552. 1(0-3) S. 
Laboratory to accompany BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II Graduate Staff 

BO (ZO) 560 Principles of Ecology. Preq.: Three semesters of college level biology courses. 
4(3-3) F. A consideration of the principles of ecology at the graduate level. Each of the major 
subject areas of ecology developed in sufficient depth to provide a factual and philosophical 
framework for the understanding of ecology. Blum 

BO 561 Physiological Ecology. Preqs.: BO 421 and BO (ZO) 560 or equivalent. 4(3-3) S. 
Alt. yrs. The plant community approached from a physiological standpoint. Emphasis 
placed on the individual in the community and how it responds to its immediate environ- 
ment on short- and long-term bases. Blum 

BO 565 Plant Community Ecology. Preq.: BO (ZO) 560 or BO (ZO) 360 or equivalent. 
4(3-3) F. Consideration of the structure and function of terrestrial vascular plant communi- 
ties, with emphasis on both classical and recent research. Topics include measurement and 
description of community properties, classification, ordination, vegetation pattern in rela- 
tion to environment, ecological succession and a survey of the vegetation of North America. 

Wentworth 



88 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

BO (BMA) 567 Modeling of Biological Systems. lt(3-2) F. (See biomathematics.) 

BO (MB) 574 Phycology. Preq.: BS 100 or BO 200. 3(1-Jf) S. Alt. yrs. An introduction to 
the taxonomy, morphology, reproduction and ecological importance of organisms which 
may be included in the algae. Attention given to the local freshwater flow and the physiol- 
ogy of selected species as it relates to algal blooms, water quality and nutrient loading in 
aquatic habitats. Graduate Staff 

BO (MB, PP) 575 The Fungi. Preq.: BO 200 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. An overview of the 
fungi within the framework of a survey of the major classes. Van Dyke 

BO (MB, PP) 576 The Fungi— Lab. Coreq.: BO 575. 1(0-3) F. Illustrative material of the 
fungal assemblages discussed in BO 575. Van Dyke 

BO 580 Plant Molecular Biology. Pre(7s..-5C//^5i, GN^ll. 3(3-0) F. Molecular analysis 
of plant growth and development. Molecula techniques and their application to under- 
standing the control of gene expression in plants. Boston 

BO 590 Topical Problems. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Discussions and readings on problems of 
current interest in the fields of ecology, anatomy and morphology, taxonomy, plant physiol- 
ogy and cell biology. May be repeated with a change in topic for a maximum of six credits. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BO 612 Plant Morphogenesis. Preq.: Six hrs. of botany equivalent to BO j^OO and BO A21. 
U(3-3)F. Alt. yrs. A review and synthesis of the factors involved in the development of plant 
form. Tissue culture experiments demonstrate levels of control from the molecular to the 
whole organism. Mott 

BO 620 Advanced Taxonomy. Preq.: BO W3. M2-6) S. Alt. yrs. Taxonomic principles 
and techniques including rules of nomenclature, literature, biosystematic methods, mono- 
graphic techniques and concepts of categories. Stucky 

BO (PP) 625 Advanced Mycology. M2-6) F. (See plant pathology.) 

BO 631 Water Relations of Plants. Preq.: BO 551 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A 
discussion of the physiological water relations of plants with emphasis on theoretical 
principles and quantitative description. Troyer 

BO 633 Plant Growth and Development. Preqs.: BO (ZO) Ulh or BO U21, organic 
chemistry. 3(3-0) S. An advanced course in plant physiology covering plant growth, devel- 
opment, differentiation, senescence and biological control mechanisms. Fites 

BO (ZO) 660 Advanced Topics in Ecology L Preq.: BO (ZO) 560. 3(3-0) S. Subject 
matter in the major fields of ecology developed through seminars and lectures, and princi- 
ples illustrated by laboratory exercises and field trips. Topics covered include microenvir- 
onment, population biology, community ecology, ecosystems and nutrient cycling. 

(ilraduate Staff 

BO 662 Applied Coastal Ecology. Preq.: BO (ZO) 360 or BO (ZO) 560. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Course covers the environmental factors, the vegetative communities, and man's influence 
on the ecology of the Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Emphasis placed on the coastal fringe 
(Outer Banks) and the problems involved in Coastal Zone Management. Course field- and 
problem-oriented and designed primarily for graduate students in environmentally 
oriented programs. Two field trips mandatory. Seneca 

BO 691 Botany Seminar. iCi-o; F,S. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 89 

BO 693 Special Problems in Botany. Credits Arranged. Directed research in some 
phase of botany other than a thesis problem, but designed to provide experience and 
training in research. Graduate Staff 

BO 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original research preliminary to writing a 
master's thesis or a doctoral dissertation. Graduate Staff 

Chemical Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. W. Roberts, Head 

Professor C. K. Hall, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: R. G. Carbonell, P. S. Fedkiw, R. M. Felder, J. K. Ferrell, H. B. 
Hopfenberg, A. S. Michaels, D. F. Ollis, M. R. Overcash, E. P. Stahel; Adjunct 
Professors: F. 0. Mixon, D. R. Squire; Professors Emeriti: D. B. Marsland, J. F. 
Seely, H. B. Smith, V. T. Stannett; Associate Professors: P. K. Kilpatrick, , P. K. 
Lim, C. J. Setzer, S. Torquato, H. M. Winston; Adjunct Associate Professor: J. 
L. Williams; Assistant Prof essors: C. M. Balik, R. T. Chern, H. H. Lamb, S. W. 
Peretti 

The Department of Chemical Engineering offers programs of advanced study 
leading to the Master of Science, Master of Chemical Engineering and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. Students enrolling for graduate study in the department 
normally have a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering, but programs can be 
arranged to accommodate students with degrees in applied mathematics, chem- 
istry, physics and other branches of engineering. 

The department occupies 50,000 square feet in the Riddick Engineering 
Laboratories. Within the building are laboratories for graduate research, fully 
staffed machine and electronics shops, and a well-equipped instrumental analy- 
sis laboratory. Several mini-computers and a large number of work stations and 
personal computers, connected to a local area network, provide outstanding 
programming and word processing capability. 

Major research in the department is in the areas of biotechnology and polymer 
and membrane science and engineering. Other active research areas include 
heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, surface science, chemical reaction 
engineering, fluid dynamics, mass transfer in porous media, solid waste man- 
agement, membrane separation techniques, batch process simulation and optim- 
ization, phase equilibrium thermodynamics, statistical thermodynamics, inter- 
facial phenomena and electrochemical engineering. 

The proximity of UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke University and the Research Tri- 
angle Park lends considerable support to departmental research programs. The 
Environmental Protection Agency, for example, has a major research facility in 
the Research Triangle Park. The department is headquarters for a major 
research center focused on industrial manufacturing improvements and the 
reduction of waste discharges to the environment. 



90 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

A brochure describing in greater detail opportunities for graduate study and 
research in chemical engineering as well as available fellowships and assistant- 
ships may be obtained upon request from the graduate administrator. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CHE 425 Process System Analysis and Control. Preq.: CHE 225. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CHE 446 Design and Analysis of Chemical Reactors. Preq.: CHE 315; Coreq.: CHE 
316. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CHE 451 Chemical Engineering Design. Preqs.: CHE 1,21, U6. 3(2-2) F,S. 

CHE (BAE) 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Preqs.: MA 202 or 212, PY 
212 or 208. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 511 Chemical Engineering Process Modeling. Preqs.: CHE 311, CHE 312, MA 
301. 3(3-0) F. Applications of the methods of mathematical analysis to the formulation and 
solution of problems in transport phenomena, process dynamics and chemical reaction 
engineering. Fedkiw 

CHE 513 Thermodynamics L Preqs.: CHE 315, 316. 3(3-0) F. In-depth coverage of 
chemical engineering thermodynamics principles. Application of non-ideal fluid-phase 
chemical potentials to problems in phase and chemical reaction equilibria. Relations of 
molecular structure and intermolecular forces to macroscopic thermodynamic properties. 

Hall, Kilpatrick, 

CHE 515 Transport Phenomena. Preq.: CHE 311. 3(3-0) F. A theoretical unified study 
of transport of momentum, energy and matter. The diffusional operations introduced in the 
light of the theory. Carbonell 

CHE 516 Transport Phenomena II. Preq.: CHE 515. 3(3-0) S. Applications of the 
principles introduced in CHE 515. The applications include multiphase flow and sedimen- 
tation, non-Newtonian and porous media flows, transport through membranes and in 
electrochemical systems, and thermal instabilities. Carbonell 

CHE 517 Chemical Reaction Engineering. Preq.: CHEU6. 3(3-0) S. Rates and mecha- 
nisms of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Design, analysis and scale-up of batch 
and continuous chemical reactors. Felder, Stahel 

CHE 521 Separation Processes. Preq.: CHE 312. 3(3-0) S. The theory and practice of 
staged multicomponent mass transfer operations and continuous rate processes. Problems 
unique to specific operations such as extractive and azeotropic distillation. Lamb, Stahel 

CHE 525 Chemical Process Control. Preq.: CHE 425. 3(3-0) F. The application of 
control techniques to chemical process systems. Review of single-input, single-output con- 
trol techniques, sampled data systems and Z-transform methods. Advanced control tech- 
niques including multivariable systems, inferential and adaptive control, deadtime con- 
trol, and interaction analysis. Ferrell, Winston 

CHE (OR) 527 Optimization of Engineering Processes. Preqs.: CHE 451 or OR 501, 
FORTRAN programming. 3(3-0) F. The formulation and solution of process optimization 
problems, with emphasis on nonlinear programming techniques. Computer implementa- 
tion of optimization algorithms, on-line optimization, simulation methods and structuring 
of process models to increase computational efficiency. Felder 



f 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 91 

CHE 535 Engineering Economy in Air Pollution Control Systems. Preqs.: MAE ^09, 
CE 576 or equivalent first course. 3(3-2) F. Design of equipment for the abatement of air 
pollution; estimation of capital cost and operating expenses; economic optimization under 
various kinds of tax laws. Marsland 

CHE 543 Polymer Sciences and Technology. Preqs.: CHE 223, CHE 316. 3(3-0) F. 
Concepts and techniques for the polymerization of macromolecules. Structure, properties, 
and applications of commercially important polymers. Chern 

CHE 551 Biochemical Engineering. Preqs.: CHE 312, U6. 3(3-0) S. Enzyme and 
microbial kinetics and reactor designs for processes involving enzymes and single and 
mixed cultures. Samples drawn from the full range of applications: food processing, single 
cell proteins, tissue culture and vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, recombinant DNA and 
hybridomas, artificial organs, biological waste treatment, and environmental processes. 

Guinnup, OUis 

CHE (TC) 569 Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. Preqs.: CHE 316, CH 
223. 3(3-0) F. Relationships between molecular structure and bulk properties of nonmetal- 
lic materials applied to commercial products and chemical engineering processes. Applica- 
tions of surface and colloid chemistry and polymer science to product development and 
process improvement. Chern, Michaels 

CHE (TC) 570 Radiation Chemistry and Technolog:y of Polymeric Systems. Preqs.: 
CH 221, 4-31. 3(3-0) S. Principles and practice of isotope and electron beam radiation 
treatment. Applications of high energy radiation in polymer chemistry and technology, 
including the use of radiation to cross-link and degrade polymers. Similarities and differ- 
ences between radiation polymerization and photopolymerization. Stannett, Williams 

CHE 597 Chemical Engineering Projects. Preq.: (yrad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Independent 
study of some phase of chemical engineering or a related field. Graduate Staff 

CHE 598 Special Topics in Chemical Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. 
Directed reading of the chemical engineering literature, introduction to research metho- 
dology, and lectures and seminar discussion on topics which vary from term to term. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CHE 613 Thermodynamics IL Preq.: CHE 513. 3(3-0) S. Topics in chemical engineer- 
ing thermodynamics. Perturbation theories, critical phenomena, multicomponent phase 
equilibria, supercritical extraction, irreversible thermodynamics and thermodynamics of 
macromolecules are representative topics. Hall, Kilpatrick 

CHE 617 Advanced Chemical Reaction Engineering. Preq.: CHE 517. 3(3-0) S. Topics 
relating to the design, analysis and operation of homogeneous and heterogeneous chemical 
reactors. Stahel 

CHE 619 Electrochemical Systems Analysis. Preqs.: CHE 515, 51 7 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Electrochemical thermodynamics, electrochemical kinetics and catalysis, coupled 
charge and material transport in an electric field and electrophoretic effects. Design and 
analysis of electrochemical reactors. Survey of electrochemical industry. Fedkiw 

CHE 651 Separation Processes for Biological Materials. Preq.: CHE 521 or CHE 551 

or CI. 3(3-0) S. Definition and engineering analysis of major bioseparation techniques 
useful in product isolation and purification. Topics discussed include solid-liquid separa- 
tion, crystallization, filtration, extraction, chromatography, membrane processes, distilla- 
tion, drying, combined operations and process economics. Ollis 



92 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CHE (TC) 669 Diffusion in Polymers. Preq.: CHE 569 or CI. 2(2-0) S. The theory of 
small molecule transport in polymers; applications of membrane transport processes in the 
chemical, polymer, textile, coatings and natural fiber industries. Chern, Hopfenberg 

CHE (TC) 671 Special Topics in Polymer Science. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F. An intensive 
treatment of topics in polymer science and technology selected in accord with the state of 
the art. Chern, Stannett 

CHE 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by 
resident faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers. Graduate Staff 

CHE 697 Advanced Chemical Engineering Projects. Preq.: Grad. standing in CHE. 
1-S F,S, Sum. Independent study of some phase of chemical engineering or a related field. 

Graduate Staff 

CHE 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Individual research in chemical engineer- 
ing. A report on this research is required as a graduate thesis. Graduate Staff 



Chemistry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor K. W. Hanck, Head 

Professor C. G. Moreland, Assistant Head for Graduate Studies 

Professor M. L. Miles, Assistant Head for Business Affairs 

Professor W. P. Tucker, Assistant Head for Undergraduate Studies 

Professors: R. D. Bereman, L. H. Bowen, C. L. Bumgardner, H. H. Carmichael, D. 
L. Comins, L. D. Freedman, F. W. Getzen, F. C. Hentz Jr., Z Z. Hugus Jr., L. A. 
Jones. S. G. Levine, G. G. Long, A. F. Schreiner. L. B. Sims. E. 0. Stejskal. G. H. 
Wahl Jr., M. H. Whangbo; Professors Emeriti: G. 0. Doak, R. H. Loeppert, W. 
A. Reid, P. P. Sutton, R. C. White; Associate Professors: C. B. Boss, T. C. Caves, 
A. F. Coots, Y. Ebisuzaki, S. T. Purrington, W. L. Switzer, D. W. Wertz; 
Associate Professor Emeritus: T. M. Ward; Assistant Professors: E. F. Bowden, 
R. J. Linderman, M. G. Khaledi, R. B. van Breemen 

The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to the Master of Chem- 
istry, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Major fields of special- 
ization are analytical, inorganic, organic and physical chemistry. A v^ide variety 
of advanced courses and a broad spectrum of research topics provide preparation 
for almost every type of position open to a chemist with an advanced degree. 

A student entering graduate work in chemistry should have a bachelor's 
degree in chemistry or its equivalent. This includes the equivalent of one-year 
courses in general, organic, physical and analytical chemistry and a semester of 
inorganic chemistry. At least one year of college physics and two years of mathe- 
matics, including differential equations, are necessary. Students who fail to meet 
these requirements may in some cases be admitted on a provisional basis. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 93 

With a large graduate faculty and favorable graduate student to faculty ratio, 
the chemistry department emphasizes individual attention, small classes and 
personal collaboration on research with faculty members. Among the variety of 
active research projects available for thesis work are organic and inorganic 
synthesis, synthesis/characterization of semiconductors, structure and proper- 
ties of organometallic compounds and transition metal complexes, stereochemis- 
try, crystallography, kinetics, electrochemistry, micro and trace analysis, atomic 
and plasma spectroscopy, micro computer and statistical applications, quantum 
chemistry, and infrared, Raman, Mossbauer, nuclear magnetic resonance, 
nuclear quadrupole resonance, electron spin resonance, and natural and mag- 
netic circular dichroism spectroscopy. 

The department is equipped with standard instruments and apparatus for 
teaching and research. Many items of specialized equipment are available 
including recording spectrophotometers covering the range from far infrared to 
ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, liquid chromatographs, 
gas chromatographs, high resolution mass spectrometer, atomic absorption 
spectrophotometers, electron spin resonance spectrometer, nuclear quadrupole 
resonance spectrometer, Mossbauer spectrometer, DC plasma spectrometer and 
X-ray diffractometer. Facilities for interfacing laboratory instruments and 
computers are available. The department's research activities are housed in a 
nine-story building and supported by glass, machine and electronic shops. 

The department has available for qualified applicants teaching and research 
assistantships, as well as a number of fellowships. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry.Coreg..- CH ^31 or CH 331. 3(3-0) S. 

CH 4 1 1 Analytical Chemistry L Preq.: CH i3l M2-6) F. 

CH 413 Analytical Chemistry IL Preq.: CH Ull. M2-6) S. 

CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis. Preq.: CH 223. 3(1-6) F,S. 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry L Preqs.: CH 107, MA 202, PY 203 or 208; Coreq.: MA 301. 
3(2-1) F,S,Sum. 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry IL Preqs.: CH U31 and MA 301. 3(2-1) F,S. 

CH 434 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory. Preq.: CH U31; Coreq.: CH h33. 2(0-U) S. 

CH 435 Physical Chemistry III. Preqs.: CH 431 and MA 301. 3(3-0) F. 

CH (TC) 461 Introduction to Fiber-Forming Polymers. Preq.: CH 223. 3(3-0) F. 

CH 490 Chemical Preparations. Preq.: Three yrs. of CH. 3(0-9) F,S. 

CH 493 Chemical Literature. Preq.: Three yrs. of CH. 1(1-0) F. 

CH 499 Senior Research in Chemistry. Preq.: Three yrs. ofCH. Credits Arranged. 1-3 
F,S,Sum. 



94 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 501 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I. Preq.: CHiSS. 3(3-0) F. The major emphasis 
of this course on the complexes of the transition metals (3d, 4d and 5d). Topics include the 
structure, stability, synthesis and raction mechanisms of these complexes. Included also is 
the consideration of organometallic compounds and of species containing metal-metal 
bonds. 

CH 503 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II. Preq.: CH 501. 3(3-0) S. This course, a 
continuation of CH 501, deals with the use of photochemical reactions as applied to inor- 
ganic complexes, metal cluster complexes and organometallic systems. Other topics 
treated at length are solid-state chemistry and bioinorganic chemistry. Discussion of 
structure, synthesis, energetics, reactions and applications presented. In addition, other 
topics of current research interest in inorganic chemistry briefly discussed. 

CH 505 Physical Methods in Inorganic Chemistry. Preqs.: (had. standing and CH501 
or CI. 3(3-0) S. The course describes the use of group, molecular orbital and ligand field 
theories for spectroscopy and bonding; measurement methodology and the significance of 
experimental parameters, including electronic, photoluminescence, photoelectron, vibra- 
tional spectroscopies, magnetic susceptibility, Mossbauer, esr, nmr, nqr and x-ray struc- 
ture determinations. 

CH (MAT) 507 Chemical Concepts in Materials Science and Engineering. 3(3-0) F. 
(See materials science and engineering.) 

CH 515 Chemical Instrumentation. Preq.: CH U31; Coreq.: CH Ull. 3(3-0) S. Basic 
electronic components and circuits, the response of laboratory instruments, design and 
modification of typical electronic control and measurement systems. Emphasis placed on 
the transducers and control elements utilized in chemical research. 

CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. Preq.: CH 315 or 331 or CI. 

3(3-0) F. The principles and applications of currently used methods of trace analysis 
presented. Designed for students with little or no experience in trace analysis but with a 
strong interest in or need for analytical data at the trace level. Topics include pulse 
polarography, potentiometry, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, atomic absorption, emission 
spectrometry, fluorescence, neutron activation analysis and spark source mass spec- 
trometry. 

CH 518 Trace Analysis Laboratory. Coreq.: CH517or CI. 2(0-6) F. The trace element 
content of samples determined by a variety of instrumental techniques including UV-Vis 
spectrophotometry, fluorescence, emission spectrometry, atomic absorption, pulse polaro- 
graphy and neutron activation analysis. 

CH 521 Advanced Organic Chemistry I. Preqs.: CH223, If33orU35. 3(3-0) F. Structure 
stereochemistry and reactions of the various classes of hydrocarbons. The molecular orbital 
treatment of bonding and reactivity of alkenes, the conformational interpretation of 
cycloalkene and cycloaklene reactivity and the application of optical isomerism to the study 
of reaction mechanisms emphasized. 

CH 523 Advanced Organic Chemistry IL Preq.: CH 521. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to 
acid-base theory and mechanistic organic chemistry as applied to synthetically useful 
organic reactions. 

CH 525 Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry. Preqs.: CH223 and 433ori35. 3(3-0) 
S. Application of physical methods to the solution of structural problems in organic chemis- 
try. Emphasis on spectral methods including infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic 
resonance, mass spectrometry, electron paramagnetic resonance. X-ray and electron dif- 
fraction and optical rotatory dispersion. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 95 

CH 530 Advanced Physical Chemistry. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F. A survey 
of chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, with emphasis on reactions in the liquid phase. 
Problem solving an important part of the course. Designed to review and to expand on 
materials usually covered in a one-year undergraduate physical chemistry course. 

CH 531 Chemical Thermodynamics I. Preqs.: CH JtSS, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. An extension 
of elementary principles to the treatment of ideal and real gases, ideal solutions, electrolytic 
solutions, galvanic cells, surface systems and irreversible processes. An introduction to 
statistical thermodynamics and the estimation of thermodynamic frunctions from spec- 
troscopic data. 

CH 533 Chemical Kinetics. Preqs.: CH ^33, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. An intensive 
survey of the basic principles of chemical kinetics with emphasis on experimental and 
mathematical techniques, elements of the kinetic theory and theory of the transition state. 
Applications to gas reactions, reactions in solution and mechanism studies. 

CH 535 Surface Phenomena. Preqs.: CH U33, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. An intensive 
survey of the topics of current interest in surface phenomena. Formulations of basic 
theories presented together with illustrations of their current applications. 

CH 536 Chemical Spectroscopy. Preq.: CH U35. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Introduction to 
rotational, vibrational and electronic molecular spectroscopy from a quantum mechanical 
viewpoint. Emphasis on the elucidation of structure, bonding and excited state properties 
of organic and inorganic molecules. 

CH 537 Quantum Chemistry. Preqs.: MA 301, CHJt35orPYW7. 3(3-0) S. The elements 
of wave mechanics applied to stationary energy states and time dependent phenomena. 
Applications of quantum theory to chemistry, particularly chemical bonds. 

CH 539 Colloid Chemistry. Preqs.: CH220, 315 or 331, or CI. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. Theories, 
basic principles and fundamental concepts including preparation and behavior of sols, gels, 
emulsions, foams and aerosols and topics in areas of adsorption, Donnan equilibrium 
dialysis and small-particle dynamics. Laboratory includes independent project studies in 
specialized areas. 

CH (MAT, TC) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Bulk Properties. 3(3-0) 
F. (See textile chemistry.) 

CH 595 Special Topics in Chemistry. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Detailed study of a particular 
problem or technique pertaining to chemistry. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CH 61 1 Analytical Spectroscopy. Preq.: CHU13 or i33. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Presentation of 
the quantitative laws of spectroscopic analysis and discussion of deviations. Discussion of 
experimental methods for spectroscopic observation. 

CH 613 Electrochemistry. Preq.: CH U33. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The thermodynamics and 
kinetics of electrode reactions presented as well as the experimental methods for studying 
them. Particular emphasis on the measurement of standard potential and establishing the 
number of electrons transferred. Applications of electrochemistry in the production/stor- 
age of energy and in chemical analysis are discussed. 

CH 625 Organic Reaction Mechanisms. Preqs.: CH523, CHU33. 3(3-0) S. A study of the 
effects of structure and substituents on the direction and rates of organic reactions. 

CH 627 Chemistry of Metal-Organic Compounds. Preq.: CH 521. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Preparation, properties and reactions of compounds containing the carbon-metal bond 
with a brief description of their uses. 



96 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CH 631 Chemical Thermodynamics II. Preq.: CH 531. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Statistical 
interpretation of thermodynamics; use of partition functions; introduction to quantum 
statistics; application of statistical mechanics to chemical problems, including calculation 
of thermodynamic properties, equilibria and rate processes. 

CH (BCH) 659 Natural Products. Preqs.: CH 523, 525 or CI. 3(3-0) F. Illustrative 
studies of structure determination, synthesis and biosynthesis of natural substances. Mod- 
ern physical methods and fundamental chemical concepts stressed. Examples chosen from 
such classes as alkaloids, terpenes, steroids and antibiotics. 

CH (MAT, TC) 662 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Solution Properties. 

3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See textile chemistry.) 

CH 691 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in CH. 1(1-0) F,S. Scientific articles, progress 
reports on research and special problems of interest to chemists reviewed and discussed. 

CH 695 Advanced Topics in Chemistry. Preq.: CI. Maximum 3 F,S. Critical study in 
one of the branches of chemistry. 

CH 697 Advanced Chemistry Projects. Preq.: Grad. standing in CH. 1-3. F,S,Sum. 
Independent literature study of a current subject in chemistry. A critical review paper of 
the selected subject must be written. 

CH 699 Chemical Research. Preq.: Grad. standing in CH. Credits Arranged. F,S. 
Special problems that furnish material for a thesis. A maximum of six semester credits 
allowed toward a master's degree; no limitation on credits in the doctoral program. 

Civil Engineering- 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E. D. Brill Jr., Head 

Professor H. E. Wahls, Associate Head, Graduate Program 

Professors: P. D. Cribbins, R. A. Douglas, J. F. Ely, J. S. Fisher, W. S. Galler, A. 
K. Gupta, K. S. Havner, Y. Horie, J. W. Horn, D. W. Johnston, N. P. Khosla, P. 
H. McDonald, C. C. Tung, P. Z. Zia; Adjunct Professor: R. C. Heath; Professors 
Emeriti: M. Amein, W. F. Babcock, R. E. Fadum, C. L. Heimbach, A.-A. I. 
Kashef, S. W. Nunnally, C. Small wood Jr., M. E. UysLnik; Associate Professors: 
S. H. Ahmad, W. L. Bingham, R. H. Borden, A. C. Chao, E. D. Gurley, P. C. 
Lambe, H. R. Maleom Jr., V. C. Matzen, J. M. Nau, M. F. Overton, M. S. 
Rahman, W.J. Rasdorf, J. C. Smith, J. R. Stone; Adjunct Associate Prof essor: J . 
E. Tidwell; Assistant Professors: R. C. Borden, F. Farid, R. R. Rust, A. E. 
Schultz 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL ADJUNCT GRADUATE FACULTY 

S.-Y. Chang, L. E. King, H. D. Robertson, J. S. Wu 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers programs of study leading to the 
Master of Civil Engineering, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. Students may major in construction engineering, geotechnical engi- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 97 

neering, public works engineering, structural engineering and mechanics, 
transportation engineering, coastal and ocean engineering, or sanitary and 
water resources engineering. 

The Master of Civil Engineering degree is a non-thesis program emphasizing 
engineering design and practice. The program of study must include a minimum 
of three credit hours of independent study with a final written report. The Master 
of Science degree requires a thesis for which no more than six semester hours of 
credit may be used to satisfy the minimum degree requirements. For both 
degrees, the major and supporting areas of study may be selected from specialty 
areas within the Department of Civil Engineering. Both degrees require a final 
oral examination. 

For the doctoral program, there are no definite requirements in credit hours. 
The coursework usually requires about one year of full-time study beyond the 
master's degree. The major element of the doctoral program is the dissertation, 
which reports an original investigation that represents a significant contribution 
to knowledge. 

The faculty is engaged in broad research areas including deterministic and 
probabilistic structural theories and mechanics, fundamental behavior of soils 
and structures, computer-aided design, artificial intelligence, highway safety, 
land use and urban planning, hydraulics and hydrology, coastal processes, mate- 
rials, construction engineering and management, waste disposal and pollution 
control. Many of the investigations are sponsored by industries and federal and 
state agencies including the continuing cooperative highway research program. 

The department cooperates with other University divisions in joint programs. 
The department, in collaboration with the Department of Political Science and 
Public Administration, offers a program in public works engineering adminis- 
tration leading to the Master of Civil Engineering with a co-major in public 
affairs. Qualified students may schedule courses in this department and in the 
Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill to receive a dual degree, a Master of Science with a major in 
transportation engineering and a Master of Regional Planning. Multidiscipli- 
nary study and research programs are also available through the North Carolina 
Institute for Transportation Research and Education, Water Resources Re- 
search Institute and the North Carolina Sea Grant Program. 

Students in other disciplines may develop minor areas of study within the 
framework of departmental course offerings. In particular, courses of instruc- 
tion in stream sanitation and industrial waste disposal provide the types of 
training in pollution control often in demand by industry. 

Brochures and supplementary information on graduate study, research and 
assistantships and fellowships are available upon request from the graduate 
administrator of the Department of Civil Engineering. For applicants without a 
degree from a U.S. institution, ORE scores are required to expedite considera- 
tion for admission and financial aid. This requirement may be waived upon 
written request for applicants with an exceptional scholastic record. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CE 406 Transportation Systems Engineering. Preq.: CE305; Coreqs.:IE311, CE375. 
3(3-0) F,S. 



98 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 425 Intermediate Structural Analysis. Preq.: CE 325. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 426 Structural Steel Design. Preq.: CE 325. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 428 Structural Design in Wood. Preq.: CE 325. 3(2-2) F. 

CE 443 Seepage, Earth Embankments and Retaining Structures. Preq.: CE 3U2. 
3(3-0) FS. 

CE 463 Cost Analysis and Control. Preq.: CE 365. 3(2-3) F,S. 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 466 Building Construction Engineering. Preqs.: CE 327, 365; Coreq.: CEU26. 3(2-2) 
F,S. 

CE 487 Introduction to Coastal and Ocean Engineering. Preqs.: CE382, sr. standing. 
3(3-0) S. 

CE 484 Water Supply and Waste Water Systems. Preq.: CE 383. 3(3-0) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 501 Transportation Systems Analysis. Preq.: CE U06. 3(3-0) F. Application of 
systems analysis to multi-modal transportation studies. Analysis, planning and design of 
transportation facilities for both the public and private sectors. Planning discussed from 
both short-run and long-run perspectives. Stone 

CE 502 Transportation Operations. Preq.: CE W6. 3(3-0) F. The analysis of traffic and 
transportation engineering operations. Graduate Staff 

CE 503 Transportation Design. Preq.: CE U06. 3(2-2) S. The geometric elements of 
traffic and transportation engineering design. Cribbins, Horn 

CE 504 Water Transportation. Preq.: CE 305. 3(3-0) S Alt. yrs. The planning, design 
and operation of waterways, ports, harbors and related marine facilities. Development of 
analytical techniques for evaluating maritime commodity flows and infrastructure 
feasibility. Cribbins 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis I. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(2-3) S. Principles and concepts for 
engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils and surface drain- 
age characteristics. Wahls 

CE 508 Public Works Engineering— Operations and Administration. Preq.: CE W6 
or CE JtSJt. 3(3-0) F. Organization, operational management and engineering responsibili- 
ties of a municipal and/or public works engineering department. Horn 

CE 509 Public Works Engineering— Analysis and Design. Preq.: CE 508. 3(1-1,) S. 
Modular design-oriented public works topics, including implication, policies, illustrations 
and case studies. Horn 

CE 510 Airport Planning and Design. Preq.: CE 305. 3(3-0) F. The analysis, planning 
and design of air transportation facilities. Cribbins 

CE 511, 512 Continuum Mechanics I, II. Preqs.: CE 313 or MAE 3 U, CE 382 or MAE 

308, MAE 301, MA 1,05. (511) 3(3-0) F; (512) 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The concepts of stress and 
strain presented in generalized tensor form. Emphasis placed on the discussion and rela- 
tive comparisons of the analytical models for elastic, plastic, fluid, viscoelastic, granular 
and porous media. The underlying thermodynamic principles presented, the associated 
boundary value problems formulated and selected examples used to illustrate the theory. 

McDonald 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 99 

CE 513 Theory of Elasticity I. Preq.: CE 313 or MAE 3U. 3(3-0) S. The fundamental 
equations governing the behavior of an elastic solid developed in various curvilinear 
coordinate systems. Plane problems, as well as the St. Venant problem of bending, torsion 
and extension of bars covered. Displacement fields, stress fields, Airy and complex stress 
functions among the methods used to obtain solutions. Douglas, Gurley, Horie 

CE 514 Stress Waves. Preqs.: MA 301; CE 313 orPYUl or MA Wl or MEA 351. 3(3-0) 
F. Alt. yrs. Introduction to the theory of stress waves in solids. Origins and nature of 
longitudinal transverse and surface waves originating at an impact site or from other 
transient disturbances. Determination of stresses, particle velocities, wave velocities. 
Introduction to wave interaction with other waves and with boundaries and dissimilar 
materials. Introduction to modern instrumentation and seismic refraction exploration. 

Douglas 

CE521 AdvaincedSirengihofMaiteria.\s. Preq.: CE 313 or MAE 3U. 3(3-0) F. Stresses 
and strains at a point: rosette analysis; strength theories, stress concentration and fatigue; 
torsion and unsymmetrical bending of open and closed sections; inelastic, composite and 
curved beams; energy methods; shear deflections; and membrane stresses in shells. 

Graduate Staff 

CE 522 Elastic Stability. Preqs.: CE 521, MA 301, ^05. 3(3-0) S. A study of elastic and 
plastic stability. The stability criterion as a determinant. The energy method and the 
theorem of stationary potential energy. The solution of buckling problems by finite differ- 
ences and the calculus of variations. The application of successive approximations to 
stability problems. Graduate Staff 

CE 524 Analysis and Design of Masonry Structures. Coreq.: CEJt27. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Theory and design of masonry arches, culverts, dams, foundations and masonry walls 
subjected to lateral loads. Graduate Staff 

CE 525 Matrix Structural Analysis. Preq.: CE U25. 3(3-0) F. Direct formulation of the 
banded system stiffness matrix and loading vectors for a first order Displacement Method 
analysis of two- and three-dimensional structural frames, trusses and grids; analysis by 
substructures; effects of prestrain, temperature, support settlements, shear deformations 
and joint deformations; second order analysis; computer applications using existing com- 
puter programs. Smith 

CE 526 Finite Element Methods for Civil Engineering. Preqs.: CE U25 and prior 
programming knowledge. 3(3-0) S. A basic course in finite element method for civil engi- 
neering. Development, theory and formulation of various finite elements. On-hand finite 
element computer programming. On-hand finite element analysis of civil engineering 
problems, such as dam structures, hyperbolic cooling towers, slabs and soil-structure 
interaction problems. Gupta 

CE 527 Analysis and Design of Structures for Dynamic Loads. Preq. or coreq.: CE 
525. 3(3-0) F. Analysis and design of single and multi-degree-of-freedom structures sub- 
jected to various types of excitations and initial conditions. Computational aspects of 
dynamic analysis. Introduction to nonlinear analysis techniques and to approximate 
methods of analysis. Consideration of strong motion earthquakes. Study of earthquake 
regulations in building codes. Matzen, Nau 

CE 531 Structural Models. Preq.: CEU27. 3(2-3) F. Dimensional analysis and structural 
similitude, indirect and direct models, model materials and experimental techniques, 
individual project in structural model analysis. Bingham, Matzen 

CE 534 Plastic Analysis and Design. Pre?..- CE427. 3(3-0) S. Theory of plastic behavior 
of steel structures; concept of design for ultimate load and the use of load factors. Analysis 
and design of components of steel frames including bracings and connections. Smith 



100 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 536 Theory and Design of Prestressed Concrete. Coreq.: CE 1^27. 3(3-0) F. The 
principles and concepts of design in prestressed concrete including elastic and ultimate 
strength analyses for flexure, shear, torsion, bond and deflection. Principles of concordancy 
and linear transformation for indeterminate prestressed structures. Application of pre- 
stressing to tanks and shells. Ahmad, Zia 

CE (MEA) 541 Gravity Wave Theory I. 3(3-0) S. (See marine, earth and atmospheric 
sciences.) 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering. Preq.: CE 3If2. 3(3-0) S. Subsoil investigations; exca- 
vations; design of sheeting and bracing systems; control of water; footing, grillage and pile 
foundations; caisson and cofferdam methods of construction. R. H. Borden, Lambe 

CE 548 Engineering Properties of Soils I. Preq.: CE 3U2. 3(2-3) F. The study of soil 
properties that are significant in earthwork engineering, including properties of soil solids, 
basic physiochemical concepts, classification, identification, plasticity; permeability, capil- 
larity and stabilization. Laboratory work includes classification, permeability and com- 
paction tests. R. H. Borden, Lambe 

CE 551 Theory of Concrete Mixtures. Preq.: CE 332. 3(3-0) F. A study in depth of the 
theory of portland cement concrete mixtures including types and properties of portland 
special cements; chemical reactions; brief examination of history of mixture design; 
detailed study of current design methods; properties of fresh and hardened concretes; 
strength-age-curing relationships; durability; admixtures; special concretes; production 
and quality control. Graduate Staff 

CE 553 Asphalt and Bituminous Materials. Preq.: CE332. 3(2-3) S. A study in depth of 
properties of asphalts and tars for use in waterproofing and bituminous materials, and 
theories of design of bituminous mixtures for construction and paving uses including types 
and properties of asphalt cements, cutbacks, emulsions, blown asphalts and tars; brief 
examination of historical developments; detailed study of properties and design of bitumi- 
nous mixtures; and current research. Laboratory work includes standard tests on asphalts, 
tars and road oils; design, manufacture and testing of trial batches; and current research 
techniques. Khosla 

CE 555 Highway and Airport Pavement Design. Preq.: CE W6 or U3. 3(2-3) F. 
Theoretical analysis and design of highway and airport pavements with critical evaluation 
of current design practices. Khosla 

CE 561 Construction Planning and Scheduling. Preq.: CE ^63. 3(3-0) F. Construction 
project planning, scheduling and control utilizing network methods. Both manual and 
computer techniques will be applied. Introduction to other quantitative management 
methods in construction. Utilizing the principles developed, students bid, plan, schedule 
and manage a construction project under competitive conditions in a computer-simulated 
environment. Graduate Staff 

CE 562 Construction Productivity. Preq.: CE A63 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Methods of 
collecting, assembling and analyzing construction productivity data in order to increase 
construction productivity. Applications of methods improvement techniques such as time- 
lapse photography, flow charts, process charts and time standards to the improvement of 
construction productivity. Safety and human factors in construction and their relation to 
construction productivity. Graduate Staff 

CE 566 Building Construction Systems. Preq.: CE U66 or CE h27 orgrad. standing in 
ARC. 3(3-0) S. Construction engineering of conventional and industrialized building sys- 
tems. Emphasis in the areas of structural systems utilizing cast-in-place concrete, precast 
concrete, prestressed concrete, structural steel, cold-formed steel, masonry, timber, com- 
posite and mixed materials. Topics include mechanisms for resisting and transmitting 
loads, detailing, fabrication, transportation, erection, stability, shoring, quality control and 
integration of service systems. Johnston 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 101 

CE (BAE, MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. Preq.: MB Wl or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. 
Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry presented and related to problems 
of stream pollution, refuse disposal and biological treatment. Laboratory exercises present 
basic microbiological techniques and illustrate from a chemical viewpoint some of the basic 
microbial aspects of waste disposal. Chao 

CE 571 Theory of Water and Waste Treatment. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Study 
of the basic physical and chemical processes underlying water and waste treatment, 
including mass transfer, equilibria, and kinetics. Galler 

CE 572 Design of Water and Wastewater Facilities. Preq.: CE 571. 3(3-0) S. Theory 
and design of water and wastewater treatment plants. Chao 

CE 573 Unit Operations and Processes in Waste Treatment. Preq.: CEUSG; Coreq.: CE 
571. 3(1-6) F. Unit operations and processes in water and wastes engineering, including 
sedimentation, thickening, chemical coagulation, vacuum filtration, carbon adsorption, 
biological treatment, and special projects. Chao, Galler 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems. Preq.: MA If05. 3(3-0) S. An examination of civil 
engineering systems and their design optimization. The systems to be studied include water 
resources engineering, structural engineering, transportation engineering and construc- 
tion. Galler 

CE (BAE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management. 3(2-3) F. (See biological and agricul- 
tural engineering.) 

CE 580 Flow in Open Channels. Preq.: CE 382. 3(3-0) F. The theory and applications of 
flow in open channels, including dimensional analysis, momentum-energy principle, grad- 
ually varied flow, high-velocity flow, energy dissipators, spillways, waves, channel transi- 
tions and model studies. Graduate Staff 

CE 582 Coastal Hydrodynamics. Preq.: CE 382 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Surface gravity 
waves, solitary waves, longwaves, impulsively generated waves, flow in inlets and estuar- 
ies, storm surge, wave refraction and diffraction, harbor oscillations. Overton 

CE583 Engineering Aspects of Coastal Processes. Preg-.-CE" 55:2 or egmva/eni.Coreg..- 
MEA (CE) 5U1. 3(3-0) S. Coastal environment, engineering aspects of the mechanics of 
sediment movement, littoral drift, beach profiles, beach stability, meteorological effects, 
tidal inlets, inlet stability, shoaling, deltas, beach nourishment, mixing processes, pollution 
of coastal waters, interaction between shore processes and man-made structures, case 
studies. Fisher 

CE 584 Hydraulics of Ground Water. Preq.: CE 382. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to ground 
water hydraulics and hydrology. Hydrologic cycle, basic ground water hydraulics, numer- 
ical solution of govern ing equations, ground water hydrology of North Carolina, well design 
and construction, flow new development, and ground water contamination sources. 

R. C. Borden 

CE 585 Urban Stormwater Management. Preq.: CE 383. 3(3-0) F. Studies of storm- 
water management in urban areas emphasizing quantitative problems in flooding, sedi- 
mentation and water quality. Review and extension of design concepts involving channels 
and impoundments. Survey of hydrographic formation techniques and examination of 
common hydrologic models. Case studies of urbanizing watersheds. Malcom 

CE 586 Engineering Hydrology. Preq.: CE 383. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. A study of hydrologic 
principles underlying procedures for surface water modeling; applications of common 
hydrologic models to actual watersheds. Malcom 



102 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 589 Special Topics in Civil Engineering. 3(3-0) F,S. New or special course on recent 
developments in some phase of civil engineering. Specific topics and prerequisites are 
identified for each section and will vary from term to term. Graduate Staff 

CE 591, 592 Civil Engineering Seminar. 11(1-0) F,S. Discussions and reports of sub- 
jects in civil engineering and allied fields. Graduate Staff 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects. 1-6 F,S. Research- or design-oriented independent 
study and investigation of a specific civil engineering topic, which culminates in a final 
written report. A minimum of three credits required for the MCE degree. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CE 601 Transportation Planning. Preq.: CE 502. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. The planning, 
administration and evaluation of various transportation engineering facilities. Cribbins 

CE 603 Advanced Airport Systems Design. Preq.: CE 510. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The 
planning, design and operation of the components of the U. S. air transportation system 
with special emphasis on the forecasting and analysis techniques used at major airports. 

Cribbins 

CE 604 Urban Transportation Planning. Preq.: CE501. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Planning and 
design of urban transportation systems as related to comprehensive urban planning: 
principles of land use planning, urban thoroughfare planning and regional planning. 

Graduate Staff 

CE 614 Plasticity and Limit Analysis. Preq.: CE 513 or 521. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Stress- 
strain rate relationships and theorems of limit analysis and shakedown in plastic solids. 
Application to collapse load calculations in arches, rings, plates and axisymmetric shells. 
Introduction to slip-line field theory of plane plastic flow and to dynamic limit analysis. 

Havner 

CE 615 Finite Deformation of Materials I. Preqs.: CE511 or 513, MA 512. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Application of the principles of classical continuum mechanics to the study of large 
deformation of solid materials. Finite strain geometry and kinematics, work-conjugate 
stress and stress-rate measures, rotating reference frames, local balance laws and jump 
conditions. Constitutive equations of nonlinearly elastic and inelastic behavior, general 
theorems for rate-type boundary value problems, conditions for bifurcation of solution. 

Havner 

CE 616 Finite Deformation of Materials II. Preq.: CE 615. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Continua- 
tion of the study of finite deformation of materials, with emphasis on metal plasticity. 
Analytical connections between constituent and aggregate behavior in heterogeneous sol- 
ids. Kinematics of crystals, theories of slip-system hardening, existence of plastic poten- 
tials. Physical and mathematical justification for the normality postulate in polycrystalline 
plasticity. Considerations of experiment, analysis of various mechanical tests at finite 
strain. Havner 

CE 623 Theory of Plates and Shells. Preq.: CE513or CE521. 3(3-0) F. Small and large 
deflection theories of thin plates; membrane analysis of shells. Various methods of analysis 
are discussed and illustrated by problems of practical interest. Gupta 

CE 625, 626 Advanced Structural Design I, II. Preqs.: (625): CEJt27, CE 525; (626) CE 
U27; Coreqs.: (626) CE 525, 526. (625) 3(3-0) S. (626) 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. Complete structural 
design of a variety of projects including comparative study of alternative solutions. Discus- 
sions of long span structural systems. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 103 

CE 627 Advanced Analysis and Design of Structures for Dynamic Loads. Preq.: CE 
527. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Consideration of the following advanced topics in the analysis and 
design of structures for dynamic loads: eigenvalue routines and numerical integration 
techniques; response analysis through the frequency domain; investigation of damping; 
variational formulation of the equations of motion; analysis and design of continuous 
systems; approximate methods of analysis; and special topics. Matzen 

CE 628 Earthquake Structural Engineering. Preq.: CE 527. 3(3-0) S. Study of the 
effects of earthquakes on structures and of the design of structures to resist earthquake 
motions; earthquake mechanisms and ground motions; response of structures to earth- 
quake motions; behavior of materials, structural elements and assemblages subjected to 
earthquakes; principles of earthquake-resistant design practice; soil-structure interac- 
tions; and special topics. Gupta, Nau 

CE 632 Probabilistic Methods of Structural Engineering. Preqs.: CE 525 and MA 
421. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Application of probability theory and stochastic processes to the 
study of safety of structures. Fundamentals of probability theory and stochastic processes; 
probabilistic modelings of structural loadings, material properties and risk. Reliability 
analysis of structures; reliability-based design criteria. Random vibration of simple struc- 
tures; safety analysis of structures under dynamic loads. Tung 

CE 635 Advanced Theory of Concrete Structures. Preq.: CE 536. 3(3-0) S. Inelastic 
theory of structural concrete members under flexure, axial load, combined flexure and 
axial compression, shear and torsion. Yield line theory of slabs. Limit analysis of beams and 
frames of reinforced and prestressed concrete. Ahmad, Zia 

CE 641, 642 Advanced Soil Mechanics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Theories of 
soil mechanics; failure conditions; mechanical interaction between solids and water, and 
problems in elasticity and plasticity pertaining to earthwork engineering. Wahls 

CE 644 Ground Water Contaminant Transport. Preq.: CE 584. 3(3-0) F. Introduction 
to the movement and attenuation of contaminants in the subsurface. Topics include com- 
mon contaminant sources; advection and dispersion; numerical modeling of contaminant 
transport; chemical and biological processes in the subsurface; and ground water restora- 
tion technology. R. C. Borden 

CE 646 Dynamics of Soils and Foundations. Preq.: CE 641. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The 
application of vibration and wave propagation theories to soil media; the review of existing 
experimental data and empirical procedures for analysis of foundation vibrations, the 
prediction of soil responses to impulse loads, dynamic properties of soils and methods for 
their determination, design procedures for foundation subjected to dynamic forces. 

Rahman, Wahls 

CE 665 Construction Equipment Systems. Preq.: CE561 or CE 562 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
S. Analysis of earthmoving and other heavy construction processes as systems in order to 
optimize the selection and employment of construction equipment. Considerations in sys- 
tem design, cost and productivity estimation, operational procedures, safety, and mainte- 
nance. Computer applications utilizing analytical and simulation techniques. 

Graduate Staff 

CE 671 Advanced Water Management Systems. Preqs.: CE375, CE571. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. The application of systems analysis methods to the design, analysis and management of 
water and waste systems. Galler 

CE 672 Advanced Water and Waste Treatment: Principles and Design. Preq.: CE 

571. 4(3-3) S. Theory and design of physiochemical processes used to control phosphorus, 
nitrogen, trace metals and toxic organic substances in water. Galler 

CE 673 Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal. Coreq.: CE 571. 3(3-0) F. Water 
requirements of industry and the disposal of industries wastes. Graduate Staff 



104 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 674 Stream Sanitation. Coreq.: CE571. 3(3-0) S. Biological, chemical and hydrologi- 
cal factors that affect stream sanitation and stream use. Graduate Staff 

CE 681 Behavior and Analysis of Ocean Structures. Preq.: CE 527. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Introduction to linear and random water waves, analysis of wave forces on small bodies, 
analysis of wave forces on large bodies, response of offshore structures to waves and 
earthquake loadings, mooring dynamics. Tung 

CE 685 Design of Coastal Facilities. Preqs.: CE 582 and CE 583. 3(3-0) F. Types and 
functions of coastal structures, computation of wave forces on coastal structures, wave 
uprush, shore protection against waves and storms, planning and design of navigation 
channels, port development, harbor design, dredging technology, planning and design of 
offshore platforms, technology of disposal of wastes and heated discharge, consideration of 
environmental effects of waste disposal. Fisher 

CE 687 Numerical Modeling for Nearshore Flow Systems. Preq.: CE 580 or CE 582 or 

MEA (CE) 5Jfl or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Basic concepts of finite difference methods, methods 
of characteristics, estuarine and inlet flow computations, implicit methods, surge on the 
open coast. Introduction to circulation in sounds and bays, modeling of ocean circulation, 
modeling of sediment movement, mixing processes, water quality modeling. 

Graduate Staff 

CE 689 Advanced Topics in Civil Engineering. 3(3-0) F,S. New or special course on 
advanced developments in some phase of civil engineering. Specific topics and prerequi- 
sites are identified for each section and will vary from term to term. Graduate Staff 

CE 698 Advanced Reading in Civil Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. 
Directed reading of advanced topics in some phase of civil engineering. Graduate Staff 

CE 699 Civil Engineering Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Independent investigation 
of an advanced civil engineering problem; a report of such an investigation is required as a 
graduate thesis. Graduate Staff 



Computer Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. E. Funderlic, Head 

Professor W.J. Stewart, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: W. Chou, D. C. Martin, D. F. McAllister, H. G. Perros, R. J. Plem- 
mons, K.-C. Tai, A. L. Tharp; Professor Emeritus: P. E. Lewis; Associate 
Professors: J. A. Bowen. E. W. Davis Jr., R. J. Fornaro, T. L. Honeycutt, H. D. 
Levin, W. E. Robbins, R. D. Rodman, C. D. Savage; Assistant Professors: D. R. 
Bahler, N. M. Bengston, R. A. Dwyer, E. F. Gehringer, J. Mauney, D. S. 
Reeves, M. F. M. Stallman, M. A. Vouk; Assistant Professor Emeritus: J. W. 
Hanson 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 105 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 
Professor: C. D. Meyer Jr.; Associate Professor: W. J. Rasdorf 

The Department of Computer Science offers graduate programs leading to a 
Master of Science with thesis, Master of Science without thesis and Doctor of 
Philosophy. Also, cooperative Master's and Ph.D. programs are available with 
the Departments of Mathematics, Operations Research and Statistics. 

Although the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Elec- 
trical and Computer Engineering administer separate graduate programs, they 
do so under a single, jointly held graduate computer engineering degree authori- 
zation. As a result, the departments cooperate closely in graduate education and 
research by sharing responsibility for a number of graduate courses, jointly 
operating the Computer Systems Laboratory, collaborating in research and 
administering a number of joint faculty appointments. The close cooperation of 
the departments offers graduate students in both disciplines an unusually wide 
range of educational and research opportunities. 

Applicants for admission must have an undergraduate degree in computer 
science or its equivalent. This should include an extensive working knowledge of 
a high-level programming language such as Pascal or C, a knowledge of compu- 
ter architecture and assembly language, operating systems and data structures. 
The applicant should also have had a three-course sequence in calculus and a 
course in probability theory. 

Requirements for the M.S. degree include thirty credits (semester hours) 
beyond the B.S. Nine of the credit hours must be in a minor area such as 
mathematics, operations research, or electrical and computer engineering. For 
the Master's degree without thesis, the three core courses (CSC (ECE) 501, CSC 
505 and CSC (ECE) 506) must be taken. In addition, nine of the credit hours must 
be chosen from a designated interest area. Currently these interest areas include 
architecture and VLSI, artificial intelligence, computer graphics, performance 
evaluation, computer communications, software systems and theory. For the 
Master's degree with thesis, the student must take CSC (ECE) 506 and either 
CSC (ECE) 501 or CSC 505. To pursue a Master's degree with thesis, the student 
must identify a suitable research topic and a member of the computer science 
graduate faculty who agrees to direct the research. 

There is no prescribed minimum number of courses for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. Normally, a student will take approximately sixty semester hours of 
course credits including the three core courses mentioned above. The actual 
courses to be taken are determined by the student's Ph.D. committee, made up of 
members of the graduate faculty. Independent reading and participation in 
seminars constitute an indispensable part of the doctoral program. 

Each M.S. and Ph.D. student must pass a comprehensive final oral examina- 
tion administered by the student's advisory committee. Additionally, each Ph.D. 
student must pass the departmental written qualifying examination and a pre- 
liminary examination which has a written and an oral component. Both compo- 
nents of the preliminary examination are administered by the student's advisory 
committee. Finally, the Ph.D. candidate must complete a thesis to the satisfaction 
of his/her Ph.D. advisory committee. 



106 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Computer Science Department, the College of Engineering and the Grad- 
uate School can offer financial assistance of various kinds to qualified students 
and applicants. More information is available on request from the graduate 
administrator. 

Artificial Intelligence Minor 

Graduate students from outside of the Department of Computer Science wish- 
ing to minor in artificial intelligence should consult this catalog under Artificial 
Intelligence. The following computer science courses may be taken in partial 
fulfillment of the minor in artificial intelligence: CSC 502, CSC 511, ECE (CSC) 
559, CSC (ECE, IE) 575, CSC 602, CSC 611, CSC (ECE, IE) 675. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CSC 412 Introduction to Computability, Languages and Automata. Preq.: CSC 322. 
3(3-0) F,S. 

CSC (MA) 416 Introduction to Combinatorics. Preq.: MA W3 or CSC 322. 3(3-0) Alt. 
yrs. 

CSC 417 Theory of Programming Languages. Preq.: SCS 322. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CSC 421 Introduction to Management Information Systems. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 422 Management Information Systems. Preq.: CSC U21. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC 423 Information Resources Management. Preq.: CSC U21. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC (MA) 427 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I. Preqs.: MA 301 or MA 312 and 

programming language proficiency. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC (MA) 428 Introduction to Numerical Analysis II. Preqs.: MA 1^05 and program- 
ming language proficiency. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 431 File Organization and Processing. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC 432 Database Management Systems. Preq.: CSC U31. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC (ECE) 440 Digital Systems Interfacing. Preq.: ECE 318 or CSC 312. 3(2-2) S. 

CSC (IE) 441 Introduction to Simulation. Preqs.: Proficiency in a programming lan- 
guage, MA 202, ST 372. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CSC 442 Digital Simulation. Preq.: CSC Ul; Coreq.: ENG 321. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CSC 451 Operating Systems. Preqs.: CSC 202, 256, 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 452 Operating Systems Projects. Preq.: CSC J,51. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CSC 461 Computer Graphics. Pre(7S..-Myl 202orMA 212; CSC 101 or CSC 111. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 462 Computer Graphics Projects. Preq.: CSC 1^61. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC 471 Programming Environments. Preqs.: CSC 202, CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 472 Software Engineering Project. Preq.: CSC 4 71; Coreq.: ENG 321. 3(3-0) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 107 

CSC 481 Software Engineering with Ada. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CSC 495 Special Topics in Computer Science. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 

CSC 499 Independent Research in Computer Science. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CSC(ECE)501 Operating Systems Principles. Pre^s..- CSC ^Oi, CSC311 andMAi21. 
3(3-0) F,S. This course covers fundamental issues for the design of operating systems. 
Topics include linkers and loaders, memory management, CPU and device scheduling, 
deadlocks, concurrency, protection and distributed systems. 

CSC 502 Computational Linguistics. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F. Natural language processing 
by computer. Finite-state, context-free, context-sensitive and transformational grammars. 
Parsing mechanisms including augmented transition networks. Analysis of complex En- 
glish sentences. Question-answering systems. 

CSC 504 Application of Linguistic Techniques to Computer Problems. Preq.: CSC 
502. 3(3-0) S. Semiotics and programming languages. Comparison of semantic theories. 
Representation, classification and interpretation of scenes and other multidimensional 
illustrations. Design of a formal language for describing two-dimensional geometric fig- 
ures, such as flowcharts, chemical structures and logic diagrams. Characterization of 
programming languages according to the theory of transformational grammar. 

CSC 505 Design and Analysis of Algorithms. Preq.: CSC 31 1 or CSC 322. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Study of techniques for the design of algorithms. Complexity and analysis of algorithms. 
Study of algorithms for certain classical problems that include sorting, searching, graphs, 
numerical algorithms and pattern matching. 

CSC (ECE) 506 Digital Systems Architecture. Preq.: ECE 3J^0 or CSC 312. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Digital systems architecture is the middle ground on which the interests of software, 
hardware and firmware come together. Among the topics considered: architectural des- 
criptions, storage systems, I/O systems, stack machines and parallelism. The structure of 
digital systems implementation also considered as it relates to architecture. 

CSC (ECE) 510 Software Engineering. Preqs.: CSC 311 and CSC 322. 3(3-0) F. The 
course introduces the principles, methods and tools for the design, coding and validation of 
software systems. Among the topics covered: software planning, cost estimation, software 
design techniques, programming methodology, program testing, proofs of program cor- 
rectness, software reliability and software management. 

CSC 511 Artificial Intelligence I. Preq.: CSC 311 and either CSC 322 or PHI 201 or PHI 

335 or background in symbolic logic. 3(3-0) F,S. Introduction to and overview of artificial 
intelligence. Study of an AI programming language such as LISP or PROLOG. Elements of 
AI problem-solving techniques. State spaces and search techniques. Logic, theorem prov- 
ing and associative databases. Introduction to knowledge representation, expert systems 
and selected topics including natural language processing, vision and robotics. 

CSC (ECE) 512 Compiler Construction. Preq: CSC 311. 3(3-0) S. This course intended 
to provide a detailed understanding of the techniques used in the design and implementa- 
tion of compilers. Formal grammars and algorithms for lexical scanners, top-down recog- 
nizers, bottom-up recognizers for simple precedence grammars, operator precedence 
grammars, high order precedence grammars and bounded-context grammars. Runtime 
storage organization for a compiler including symbol tables, internal forms for source 
programs, semantic routines, error recovery and diagnostics, code generation and optimi- 
zation and interpreters. 

CSC (ECE) 513 Digital Signal Processing. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer 
engineering.) 



108 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CSC (ECE) 514 Random Processes. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer engineering.) 

CSC (ECE) 518 Computer Graphics. Preqs.: MA A05, knowledge of FORTRAN or 
PASCAL. 3(3-0) F. Clipping, windowing, transformations, projections, hiddenline and 
surface removal, smooth shading, shadowing, translucence, reflection, refraction, curve 
and surface representation. 

CSC (ECE) 520 Fundamentals of Logic Systems. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer 
engineering.) 

CSC (ECE) 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design. 3(3-0) F,S. (See electrical 
and computer engineering.) 

CSC (MA) 529, 530 Numerical Analysis I, IL 3(3-0) F,S. (See mathematics.) 

CSC (ECE) 533 Digital Electronics. 3(3-0) S. (See electrical and computer engineering.) 

CSC 541 Advanced Data Structures. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. Complex and specialized 
data structures relevant to the design and development of effective and efficient software. 
Hardware characteristics of storage media. Primary file organizations. Hashing functions 
and collision resolution techniques. Low level and bit level structures including signatures, 
superimposed coding, disjoint coding and Bloom filters. Tree and related structures includ- 
ing AVI trees, B*trees, tries and dynamic hashing techniques. 

CSC (ECE) 542 Database Management. Preq.: CSC i31 or CSC (ECE) 501. 3(3-0) F. 
The course covers the fundamentals of the area of database management. Basic topics 
include: general architecture for database management systems; current data models such 
as network, relational, hierarchical; security and integrity; discussion of current imple- 
mented systems. 

CSC (ECE) 558 Image Processing. 3(3-0) Every yr. (See electrical and computer 
engineering.) 

CSC (ECE) 559 Pattern Recognition. 3(3-0) S. (See electrical and computer engi- 
neering.) 

CSC (ECE, OR, IE) 562 Computer Simulation Techniques. Preqs.: ST 516 and a 
scientific programming language. 3(3-0) F. Basic discrete event simulation methodology: 
random number generators, simulation designs, validation, analysis of simulation output. 
Applications to various areas of scientific modeling. Simulation language such as SLAM 
and GPSS. Computer assignments and projects. 

CSC (ECE) 571 Data Transmission/Communications. Preqs.: CSC 312 or ECE 301. 
3(3-0) S. Deals with the principles and techniques of moving digital data through transmis- 
sion facilities. To be covered: digital information representation; characteristics of chan- 
nels; modulation and demodulation (MODEM) techniques; error detection and correction; 
line control procedure; circuit, message and packet switching; multiplexors and concen- 
trators. 

CSC (ECE) 572 Computer Communications. Preq.: CSC 312 or ECE 3U0 or CSE U5U; 
Coreq.: B average in technical subjects. 3(3-0) F. The purpose of this course is to enable the 
student to understand the principles, the control and operations and the potential of 
computer communication systems; to present techniques for topological design and ana- 
lytic modeling of such systems; and to provide the foundation for more detailed studies and 
research. The courses self-contained and focus on practical applications of state-of-art 
techniques. 

CSC (ECE) 573 Introduction to Computer Performance Modelling. Preqs.: CSEU5^, 
MA U21; Coreq.: CSC 501. 3(3-0) F. Workload characterization, collection and analysis of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 109 

performance data, instrumentation, tuning, analytic models including queueing network 
models and operational analysis, economic considerations. 

CSC (ECE) 574 Real Time Computer Systems. Preq.: CSC A05 or CSC (ECE) 501. 
3(3-0) S. Hardware and software characteristics of computer systems designed to meet 
specific response time requirements studied. Topics include allocation of system resources 
including processor memory, disk, support I/O devices; synchronous and asynchronous 
event scheduling; effect of interrupts; static and dynamic priorities; implementation of 
queues; measurement of performance, especially scheduling and response accuracy. 

CSC (ECE, IE) 575 Voice Input/Output Communication Systems. 3(3-0) F. (See 
industrial engineering.) 

CSC (MA) 583 Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations. Preq.: MA 
512. 3(3-0) S. Numerical methods for initial value problem including predictor-corrector, 
Runge-Kutta, hybrid and extrapolation methods; stiff systems; shooting methods for two- 
point boundary value problems; weak, absolute and relative stability results. 

CSC (MA) 584 Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations— Finite Dif- 
ference Methods. Preq.: Knmvledge to the level of CSC Jt27-Jt28. 3(3-0) F,S. Numerical 
methods for the solutions of parabolic, elliptic and hyperbolic partial differential equations 
including stability and convergence results. 

CSC (MA, OR) 585 Graph Theory. Preq.: MA U05. 3(3-0) F. Basic concepts of graph 
theory. Trees and forests. Vector spaces associated with a graph. Representation of graphs 
by binary matrices and list structures. Traversability. Connectivity, Matching and 
assignment problems. Planar graphs. Colorability. Directed graphs. Applications of graph 
theory with emphasis on organizing problems. 

CSC (MA) 587 Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations— Finite Ele- 
ment Method. 3(3-0) S. (See mathematics.) 

CSC 591 Special Topics in Computer Science. Preqs.: B average in technical subjects 
and CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Topics of current interest in computer science not covered in existing 
courses. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CSC 602 Computational Semantics. Preqs.: CSC 502 and CSC 322 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
S. An examination of how to represent meaning in natural language to a computer. Logical 
systems for representing meaning. Other systems for representing meaning such as con- 
ceptual dependencies. Generating natural language output from data bases representing 
knowledge. Reading of advanced material in such areas as natural language dialogue 
processing. 

CSC (OR) 605 Large Scale Linear Programming Systems. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See 
operations research.) 

CSC (ECE) 606 Concurrent Software Systems. Preq.: CSC (ECE) 501. 3(3-0) S. This 
course covers concepts, techniques and tools for the development of concurrent (parallel or 
distributed) software systems. Topics include specification of concurrency, design of con- 
current software systems, concurrent languages and validation of concurrent 
programs. 

CSC 611 Artificial Intelligence II. Preq.: CSC 511. 3(3-0) S. This is a second course in 
artificial intelligence emphasizing advanced concepts of AI including logic programming, 
automatic programming, natural language understanding, visual perception by machine, 
learning and inference, intelligent computer-aided instruction, knowledge representation, 
robotics and other topics to be chosen by the instructor. Students asked to write programs in 
an AI programming language such as LISP and PROLOG. 



110 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CSC (ECE) 640 Advanced Logic Systems. 3(3-0) S. (See electrical and computer 
engineering.) 

CSC (ECE) 641 Sequential Machines. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer engi- 
neering.) 

CSC (ECE) 651 Statistical Communication Theory. 3(3-0) S. (See electrical and com- 
puter engineering.) 

CSC (ECE) 652 Information Theory. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer engi- 
neering.) 

CSC (ECE) 659 Computer Vision. 3(3-0) F. (See electrical and computer engineering.) 

CSC (lE.OR) 662 Stochastic Simulation Design and Analysis. Preqs.: CSC (ECE, IE, 
OR) 562 and ST 516. 3(3-0) S. Advanced topics in stochastic system simulation covered, 
including random variate generation, output estimation for stationary and nonstationary 
models, performance optimization techniques, variance reduction approaches. Students 
apply these techniques to actual simulations. A paper written on a current research topic 
required. 

CSC (ECE) 671 Advanced Computer Performance Modelling. Preqs.: CSC (ECE) 
573 or OR (IE) 561. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. In-depth study of computer performance modelling 
techniques such as exact and approximate analysis of queueing networks and direct and 
iterative numerical solutions of queueing systems. 

CSC (MA) 672 Advanced Numerical Linear Algebra. 3(3-0) S. (See mathematics.) 

CSC (MA) 673 Parallel Algorithms and Scientific Computation. 3(3-0) S. (See 
mathematics.) 

CSC (MA) 674 Nonlinear Equations and Unconstrained Optimization. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. (See mathematics.) 

CSC (ECE, IE) 675 Advances in Voice Input/Output Communications Systems. 

3(2-3) S. (See industrial engineering.) 

CSC 691 Advanced Topics in Computer Science. Preqs.: (yrad. standing, CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Advanced topics of current interest in computer science not covered by existing courses. 

CSC 693 Individual Topics in Computer Science. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 1-3 F,S. 
An opportunity for an individual graduate student to investigate special topics of interest 
under the direction of members of the graduate faculty. 

CSC 695 Seminar in Computer Science. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 1(1-0) F,S. Seminar 
discussion of problems of current research interests in computer science. Seminar speakers 
consist of advanced graduate students, faculty and invited speakers. 

CSC 699 Computer Science Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Arranged. 
F,S. Individual research by graduate student^ minoring and majoring in computer science. 
Research may be done under the supervision of CSC faculty members meeting the interest 
and need of the student. 

Counselor Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see counselor 
education under education. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 111 

Crop Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. C. Wynne, Head 

Professors: B. E. Caldwell, D. S. Chamblee, H. D. Coble, W. K. Collins, F. T. 
Corbin, E. J. Dunphy, D. A. Emery, W. T. Fike, M. M. Goodman, J. T. Green 
Jr., H. D. Gross, W. M. Lewis, R. C. Long, J. P. Mueller, R. P. Patterson, G. F. 
Peedin, T. J. Sheets, H. T. Stalker Jr., G. A. Sullivan, D. H. Timothy, J. B. 
Weber, W. W. Weeks, E. A. Wernsman, A. D. Worsham; Professors (USDA):3. 
C. Burns, J. W. Burton, G. R. Gwynn, S. C. Huber, D. E. Moreland, H. Selt- 
mann, R. F. Wilson; Adjunct Professors: D. T. Patterson, L. Thompson Jr.; 
Professors Emeriti: C. T. Blake, C. A. Brim, J. F. Chaplin, W. A. Cope, D. U. 
Gerstel, W. B. Gilbert, W. C. Gregory, P. H. Harvey, G. L. Jones, J. A. Lee, R. P. 
Moore, L. L. Phillips, D. L. Thompson, J. A. Weybrew; Associate Professors: J. 
R. Anderson Jr., D. T. Bowman, J. M. DiPaola, R. E. Jarrett, R. D. Keys, H. M. 
Linkler, C. H. Peacock, A. C. York; Associate Professors (USDA): T. E. Carter 
Jr., J. E. Miller, T. W. Rufty, Jr.; Assistant Professors: A. H. Bruneau, D. A. 
Danehower, D. S. Guthrie, J. P. Murphy, S. M. Reed, R. C. Rufty, W. D. Smith, 
M. G. Wagger, R. Wells, G. G. Wilkerson; Assistant Professors (USDA): J. M. 
Anderson, K. 0. Burkey, J. M. Ferguson, D. Fisher, S. H. Kay, P. Kwanyuen, 
P. H. Sisco Jr., A. K. Weissinger 

The Department of Crop Science offers instruction leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the fields of plant breeding, crop 
production and physiology, forage crops ecology, turfgrass science, weed control 
and plant chemistry. For students who wish general training, the Master of 
Agriculture is offered. 

Excellent facilities for graduate training are available. Many special facilities 
such as preparation rooms for plant and soil samples, cold storage facilities for 
plant material, greenhouse space, growth control chambers and access to compu- 
ter facilities and the plant environment laboratory (Phytotron) are provided if 
required. Research farms located throughout North Carolina include a variety of 
soil and climatic conditions needed for experiments in plant breeding, crop 
management, forage ecology and weed control. A turfgrass research facility is 
located near the campus. 

Strong supporting departments increase opportunities for broad and thorough 
training. Among the departments in which graduate students in crop science 
work cooperatively or obtain instruction are Biochemistry, Botany, Chemistry, 
Computer Science, Entomology, Horticultural Science, Genetics, Mathematics, 
Microbiology, Plant Pathology, Soil Science and Statistics. 

In North Carolina, a state which derives a major portion of its agricultural 
income from farm crops, opportunities for crop science graduates are great. 
Recipients of advanced degrees in crop science at North Carolina State Univer- 
sity are found in positions of leadership in research and education throughout the 
nation and the world. 



112 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CS 4 11 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production. Preq.: BO U21. 2(2-0) F. 

CS 413 Plant Breeding. Preq.: GN ill. 2(2-0) S. 

CS 4 14 Weed Science. Preq.: CH 220. M3-2) F. 

CS (SSC) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems. Preqs.: CS211, CSAU, SSCSJ^l, SSC 
3U2, SSC 352, Sr. standing. 3(2-3) S. 

CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science. Preq.: Sr. in crop science or related field. 1(1-0) 
S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CS 511 Tobacco Technology. Preq.: BO U21 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A study of special 
problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest research problems and findings 
dealing with this important cash crop discussed. Peedin 

CS 513 Physiological Aspects of Crop Production. Preq.: BO U21. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Discussion emphasizes pertinent physiological processes associated with crops and crop 
management such as plant growth, maturation, respiration and photoperiodism. Relation- 
ship of the environment to maximum crop yields discussed. Fike 

CS (HS) 515 Weed Science Research Techniques. Preq.: CSAH or equivalent. 1(0-2) F. 
Bioassay techniques for detection of herbicide residues in soils, chemical analytical (GLC, 
HPLC) techniques for identifying herbicide residues in soils and plants, procedures for 
studying adsorption and leaching in soils, procedures for measuring herbicide interference 
of photosynthesis and use of '''C-labeled herbicides for following uptake, transport and 
metabolism of herbicides in plants. Graduate Staff 

CS (HS) 516 Weed Biology. Preq.: CSl^U. 1(1-0) F. Weed seed development and disper- 
sal, seed domancy, oil seed bank, seedling development, growth analysis, reproduction, 
community structure, population dynamics, species interactions, environmental effects on 
interactions and influence of man. Taught first 5 weeks of semester. Coble 

CS (HS) 517 Weed Management Systems. Preq.: CS 4H or equivalent. 1(1-0) F. Weed 
management systems including integration of cultural, biological, mechanical, and chemi- 
cal methods for vegetables, fruits, ornamentals, turf, small grains, corn, tobacco, cotton, 
peanuts, aquatic and non-cropland settings. Taught second 5 weeks of semester. 

Graduate Staff 

CS (HS) 518 Biological Control of Weeds. Preq.: CSJ^IU or equivalent. 1(1-0) F. Concepts 
and methods in the use of biological agents for control of weeds. Primary emphasis on weed 
bio-control with insects and plant pathogens. Taught third 5 weeks of semester. 

Van Dyke 

CS (GN, HS) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. Preqs.: GN 506, ST 511. 3(3-0) F. An 
advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts of 
inheritance. Murphy, Wehner 

CS (GN) 545 Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants. Preq.: GN 505 or GN(ZO) 5A0. 
3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Review of progression to modern evolutionary thought; concepts of 
speciation and classification; origin of variation in plants; theories relating to origins of 
cultivation and spread of agriculture variation patterns and special attributes of cultigens; 
interactions of crops and environments; evolution under domestication; modern aspects of 
evolution as related to breeding. Stalker 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 113 

CS (BO, GN, HS) 547 Cell and Tissue Techniques in Plant Breeding. Preqs.: GN505B 
and GN 506B or equivalent. 3(l-i)F. Alt. yrs. Applications of tissue culture and cytogenetic 
techniques for plant improvement. Callus and suspension cultures, plant regeneration, in 
vitro selection, haploidy, polyploidy, aneuploidy, wide hybridization and embryo rescue. 
Practical lab experiences in tissue culture and cytogenetic techniques. Stalker 

CS 591 Special Problems. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged. F.S.Sum. Special problems in 
various phases of crop science. Problems may be selected or will be assigned. Emphasis 
placed on review of recent and current research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY* 

CS 61 1 Metabolism and Crop Productivity. Preqs.: BCH U51; BO 551 or 552. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. A comprehensive examination of basic metabolic processes related to germination, 
cell wall formation, carbon and nitrogen utilization, and macromolecular biosynthesis and 
partitioning, and how these processes interact with plant genotype and environment to 
affect growth, development and dry matter accumulation in crop plants. Long 

CS (HS, SSC) 614 Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. Preqs.: BO 551 and CH223 
or CI. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. The chemical and physiological processes involved in the behavior 
of herbicides in plants and soils examined. Topics to be discussed include absorption, 
translocation, metabolism and mechanisms of action of herbicides on plants; reactions, 
movement and degradation of herbicides in the soil ; and interactions among herbicides and 
other pesticides. Weber 

CS (GN, HS) 615 Quantitative Genetics in Plant Breeding. Preqs.: CS (GN, HS) 5U1, 
ST 512, course in quantitative genetics recommended. 1(1-0) S. Alt. yrs. Theory and princi- 
ples of plant quantitative genetics. Experimental approaches of relationships between type 
and source of genetic variability, concepts of inbreeding, estimations of genetic variance 
and selection theory. Burton 

CS (GN, HS) 616 Breeding Methods. Preqs.: CS (GN, HS) 5U, ST 512. 2(2-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Theory and principles of plant breeding methodology including population improvement, 
selection procedures, genotypic evaluation, cultivar development and breeding strategies. 

Wynne 

CS (GN, HS) 617 Nonconventional Plant Breeding. Preq.: CS (GN, HS) 5U1. 1(1-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. Theory and principles of molecular and nonconventional plant breeding. Experi- 
mental approaches to induce genetic change, cytoplasmic recombination, haploid utiliza- 
tion and potentials of molecular techniques for solving breeding problems. Sisco 

CS (GN, HS, PP) 618 Breeding for Pest Resistance. Preqs.: CS (GN, HS) 5hl, PP315, 
ST 512. 2(2-0) F. Alt. yrs. Theory and principles of breeding for pest resistance. Experimen- 
tal approaches for examining genetics of host-parasite interactions, expression and stabil- 
ity of pest resistance and breeding strategies for developing pest-resistant cultivars. 

Rufty 

CS 690 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. A maximum of two credits allowed 
toward the master's degree; however, additional credits toward the doctorate allowed. 
Scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of interest to agrono- 
mists reviewed and discussed. Graduate Staff 

CS 699 Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. A maximum of six credits 
allowed toward the master's degree, but no restrictions toward the doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 



•Students are expected to consult with the instructor before registration. 



114 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Curriculum and Instruction 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see education. 

Design 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see architec- 
ture, landscape architecture, product design. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

DN 400 Design Studio. Preq.: DF 102 or written approval ofdept head. 6(0-9) F,S. 

DN 411 Advanced Visual Laboratory. Preqs.:DFl02orboihDFlll andDFll2. 3(0-6) 
F,S. 

DN 412 Advanced Photography. Preq.: DN 312. 3(1-Jt) S. 

DN 413 Synthetic Drawing. Preq.: DF 102. 3(2-3) F. 

DN 414 Color and Light Laboratory. Preq.: DF 102. 3(3-0) F,S. 

DN 415 Microcomputer Graphics for Designers. 3(3-0) S. 

DN 419 Multi-Media in Design. Preq.: DN 212. 3(1-U) S. 

DN 421 Environmental Cognition for Designers. 3(3-0) F. 

DN 423 Concepts of Space. 3(3-0) F. 

DN 445 Aesthetics and Design. Preq.: DN Ul or DN U2. 3(3-0) F. 

DN 454 Geometry for Designers. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

DN 491 Special Seminar in Design. 1-3 F,S. 

DN 492 Special Topics in Design. 1-3 F,S. 

DN 494 Internship in Design. Preqs.: Jr. standing, 3.0 GPA or better, approval ofdept 
head. 3-6 (Max. 6) F,S. 

DN 495 Independent Study in Design. Preqs.: Jr. standing, 3.0 GPA or better, approval 
ofdept. head. 1-3 (Max. 6) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

DN 541 Seminar on Ideas in Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-3 F,S. An examination of 
aesthetics and the relationships of philosophic thought to design. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

DN 611 Advanced Visual Laboratory. Preq.: Grad. standing; may be taken for a maxi- 
mum of 12 credit hours. 2-U F,S. Advanced experimental studies in visual phenomena 
related to design. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 115 

Ecology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor A. G. Wollum II, Chair 

Professors: D. A. Adams, S. P. S. Arya, R. C. Axtell, K. R. Barker, D. M. Benson, 
U. Blum, J. R. Bradley Jr., S. W. Buol, D. S. Chamblee, A. W. Cooper, B. J. 
Copeland, P. D. Doerr, G. H. Elkan, D. J. Frederick, L. F. Grand, H. D. Gross, 
F. P. Hain, D. Kamykowski, G. G. Kennedy, J. M. Miller, K. H. Pollock, L. A. 
Real, E. D. Seneca, D. L. Solomon, R. E. Stinner, H. R. van der Vaart, T. R. 
Wentworth, T. G. Wolcott, A. D. Worsham; Professor (USDA): J. C. Burns; 
Professor (USDI): M. T. Huish; Professors Emeriti: F. E. Guthrie, D. W. Hayne, 
T. 0. Perry; Associate Professors: H. L. Allen Jr., C. Brownie, L. B. Crowder, J. 
M. DiPaolo, F. L. Gould, B. C. Haning, R. A. Lancia, S. C. Mozley, R. A. Powell, 
J. R. Walters; Associate Professor (USDA): K. P. Burnham; Assistant Profes- 
sors: D. M. Checkley Jr., L. A. Levin 

Ecology is the science concerned with the interactions of organisms with each 
other and with their environment. It is an integrative science through which one 
gains an understanding of biological and physical interrelationships and pre- 
dicts the consequences of altering one or several components of an ecosystem. 

Students in a number of basic and applied curricula may elect to major in 
ecology at the master's level leading to an M.S. degree or minor in ecology at the 
master's and Ph.D. levels. The minor provides an opportunity for a coherent 
picture of the field of ecology but does not usurp the normal prerogatives of 
graduate advisory committees in structuring graduate programs. 

The ecology minor is an interdepartmental program drawing faculty from the 
botany, crop science, entomology, forestry, marine, earth and atmospheric sci- 
ences, microbiology, plant pathology, soil science, statistics and zoology depart- 
ments. The program is administered by the Ecology Advisory Committee. Addi- 
tional information about the program may be obtained by writing to one of the 
faculty members listed above or to Chair, Ecology Faculty, P. 0. Box 7619, North 
Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7619. 

The following courses are recognized as ecological and have been grouped into 
certain related areas. (For course descriptions, see respective departmental 
listings.) 

General Ecoloffy: BO (ZO) 560 Principles of Ecology; BO 565 Plant Community Ecology; 
BO (ZO) 660 Advanced Topics in Ecology I. 

Population Ecology: ZO 517 Population Ecology; ENT 531 Insect Ecology. 

Limnoloffu and Marine Science: ZO 419 Introduction to Limnology; ZO (ENT) 509 
Ecology of Stream Invertebrates; ZO (MEA) 520 Principles of Biological Oceano- 
graphy; ZO 619 Advanced Limnology. 

Behavior: ZO 410 Introduction to Animal Behavior; ZO 501 Ornithology; ZO 691 Topics 
in Animal Behavior. 



116 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Microbial Ecology: MB SOIA.B.C Advanced Microbiology I (A-Metabolism; B-Physiol- 
ogy\ C-Immunology); SSC (MB) 532 Soil Microbiology; PP 611 Advanced Plant Nema- 
tology; PP (BO) 625 Advanced Mycology. 

TerrestHal Ecology: BO 544 Plant Geography; ZO 544 Mammalogy; SSC 551 Soil 
Morpholog>'. Genesis and Classification; MEA 555 Meteorology- of the Biosphere. 

Physiological Ecology: ZO (PHY) 513 Comparative Physiology; ZO (FW) 515 Fish 
Physiology; BO 561 Physiological Ecology. 

Ma</i«ma«icaffiiofo^ and ^co/oflrj/.-ZO(FW) 553 Principles of Wildlife Science- BMA 
(MA. ST) 571, 572 Biomathematics I, II. 

Applied Ecology: CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production- ZO (FW) 420 
Fishery Science; ZO 441 Ichthyology; FOR 452 Silvics; FOR 472 Renewable Resource 
Policy and Management; SSC 472 Forest Soils; TOX 515 Environmental Toxicology- 
ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Control; ZO (FW) 554 Wildlife Field Studies- ENT 
562 Insect Pest Management in Agricultural Crops; ENT (ZO) 582 Medical and 
Vetermary Entomology; FOR 613 Special Topics in Silviculture; FOR 614 Advanced 
Topics in Administration of Forest Resources; BO 662 Applied Coastal Ecology. 

The requirements for a major in Ecology are: 

Master of Science Degree: Six courses including BO (ZO) 560 (or its equivalent) either 
BO 565, BO (ZO) 660, ST 51 1. ECO 690 and one course from each of two designated areas 
(population ecology, limnology and marine science, etc.). The latter two courses should 
not be in the same department as the major professor. 



The requirements for a minor in Ecology are: 



Master of Science Degree: Three ecological courses, including BO (ZO) 560 (or its equi- 
valent) and either BO 565 or BO (ZO) 660. The third course should not be in the same 
department as the major. 

Ph.D. Degree: Four ecological courses, including BO (ZO) 560 (or its equivalent) and at 
least one other course from the general ecology area. One course outside the general 
ecology area is required. If more than one course is taken from outside the general ecology 
area, these courses must come from different designated areas (i.e., population ecology 
limnology and marine science, etc.). Courses outside the general ecology area should not 
be from the same department as the major. 

Incoming students may apply equivalent courses toward these requirements at 
the discretion of their graduate committees. Students minoring in ecology, par- 
ticularly at the Ph.D. level, are encouraged to take courses in mathematics and 
statistics, at least ST 511 and ST 512. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ECO 690 Ecology Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F. Scientific articles, progress 
reports and special problems of interest to ecologists are reviewed and discussed. Minimum 
ot one seminar presentation required for credit. 

ECO 693 Special Problems in Ecology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Investiga- 
tion ot special problems in ecology of particular interest to advanced students under the 
direction of a faculty member. Directed research in some specialized phaseof ecology other 
tnan a thesis problem, but designed to provide experience and training in research 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 117 

Economics and Business 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. M. Hoover, Head 

Professor C. R. Knoeber, Graduate Administrator 

Associate Professor S. E. Margolis, Management Program Director 

Graduate Advisor and Program Assistant B. L. Puryear 

Professors: S. G. Allen, G. A. Carlson, R. L. Clark, A. J. Coutu, R. D. Dahle, L. E. 
Danielson, J. E. Easley Jr., E. W. Erickson, R. M. Fearn, D. Fisher, A. R. 
Gallant, T. J. Grennes, J. D. Hess, D. L. Holley Jr., D. M. Holthausen Jr., D. N. 
Hyman, L. A. Ihnen, P. R. Johnson, T. Johnson, C. P. Jones, C. J. Messere, C. L. 
Moore Sr., E. C. Pasour Jr., D. K. Pearce, R. J. Peeler, R. K. Perrin, R. A. 
Schrimper, J. J. Seater, V. K. Smith, D. A. Sumner, R. E. Sylla, C. B. Turner, 
M. L. Walden, P. F. Williams, M. K. Wohlgenant; Extension Professors: H. L. 
Liner, R. C. Wells; Professors Emeriti: R. C. Brooks, R. A. King, T. E. Nichols 
Jr., B. M. Olsen, C. R. Pugh, J. A. Seagraves, R. L. Simmons, J. G. Sutherland, 
W. D. Toussaint, J. C. Williamson Jr.; Associate Professors: D. S. Ball, J. W. 
Bartley, D. L. Baumer, G. A. Benson, J. C. Button Jr., E. A. Estes, D. J. Flath, 
K. B. Frazier, E. Gerstner, J. S. Lapp, S. J. Liebowitz, E. A. McDermed, M. B. 
McElroy, R. B. Palmquist, J. C. Poindexter Jr., J. W. Rockness, R. J. Rossana, 
C. D. Safley, W. N. Thurman, W. J. Wessels, J. W. Wilson, G. J. Zuckerman; 
Associate Professors Emeriti: H. C. Gilliam Jr., C. W. Harrell Jr.; Assistant 
Professors: B. Babcock, R. N. Collender, P. L. Fackler, T. A. Feitshans, L. B. 
Ferreri, T. R. Fortenbery, A. R. Hall, A. E. Headen, D. L. Hoag, A. J. McKee 
Jr., K. Mitchell, C. M. Newmark, R. R. Rucker, K. D. Zering 

Economics and Business offers programs of study leading to the Master of 
Economics, the Master of Arts in economics, the Master of Science in agricultu- 
ral economics, the Master of Science in management (in conjunction with other 
departments) and the Ph.D. degree in economics. Emphasis is placed on eco- 
nomic theory and quantitative economic analysis and their application to eco- 
nomic problems. Special seminars and workshops are available to students as a 
means of pursuing topics of special interest. 

The Master of Economics and the Master of Arts in economics require a 
minimum of 30 hours of course work. Flexible course requirements permit a 
student, in consultation with a graduate advisory committee, to develop a pro- 
gram to meet individual academic and career objectives. Price Theory (EB 501), 
Income and Employment Theory (EB 502) and a nine-hour minor in a discipline 
outside economics and business are required. The most popular minor discipline 
is statistics, but many departments offer minor programs, including Industrial 
Engineering, Operations Research, Mathematics, and Political Science and Pub- 
lic Administration. The remaining course work (fifteen hours) is selected from 
the varied economics and business offerings below. The Master of Arts in eco- 



118 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

nomics differs from the Master of Economics only in that the former substitutes 
six hours of thesis research for six hours in the major. 

The Master of Science in agricultural economics also requires a minimum of 30 
hours of course work. EB 501, EB 502, one course from the agricultural econom- 
ics offerings and a nine-hour minor from outside economics and business are 
required. The statistics minor is often chosen since six hours of statistics are 
required for this degree. A thesis is required and six hours of research study 
toward the thesis can be included in the program. The remaining course work is 
selected from such areas as agricultural production economics, agricultural 
policy, agricultural markets, managerial finance, natural resources and so forth, 
according to the student's interests. 

Prerequisites for any of these programs include one semester each of interme- 
diate microeconomics and macroeconomics and a minimum of one semester of 
calculus. A full year of calculus is advised. Domestic students may complete these 
prerequisite courses by registering through the Division for Lifelong Education 
in a special part-time preparatory program. Post-baccalaureate Studies (PBS). 
GRE scores are not required of applicants but are recommended. 

The Master of Science in management (MSM) degree emphasizes the applica- 
tion of quantitative techniques and economic analyhsis to management decision 
making. This unique program is the result of the combined efforts of nine 
academic areas and provides students an opportunity to concentrate in a field of 
study offered by any of these departments. This concentration is known as the 
student's technical option and can be completed in: Biotechnology, Civil Engi- 
neering, Computer Studies, Economics and Business, Industrial Engineering, 
Management Information Systems, Operations Research, Statistics, Telecom- 
munications Systems Engineering, and Textile and Apparel Management. See 
the complete description of this program, including the core management and 
economics course work in this bulletin, listed under Management. 

The Ph.D. program has no specific hour requirements; however, at least six 
semesters of work beyond the bachelor's degree are required, of which at least 
two consecutive semesters must be in residence. Candidates take course work and 
written examinations in economic theory and complete a minor of their choice. In 
addition, each student chooses a concentrated field of study within economics 
{e.g., agricultural economics, econometrics, applied macroeconomics, interna- 
tional trade, resource and environmental economics, labor economics and human 
resources or industrial organization). A minimum of two semesters of differen- 
tial and integral calculus and a master's degree are prerequisites for the Ph.D. 
program. Students possessing only a bachelor's degree may enter one of the 
master's programs and complete courses which may be applied toward the Ph.D. 
There is no foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. GRE scores are not 
required of applicants but are recommended. 

Microcomputer, mainframe computer access and library facilities are availa- 
ble to students for course work and research uses. The Microcomputer Instruc- 
tional Laboratory consists of forty-five IBM personal computers linked to prin- 
ters and memory devices in a local area network. In addition, the Programming 
Applications Laboratory provides technically trained programming personnel 
to assist in the preparation of work for mainframe computing. A well-equipped 
economics and business library, the University's D. H. Hill Library and library 
facilities of two nearby major universities are readily available for graduate 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 119 

student use. Graduate students on financial support are provided study carrels or 
office space. 

The services of the University's Career Planning and Placement Center are 
available to all students. In addition, economics and business employs a place- 
ment counselor to serve its current students and recent graduates. 

For additional information, contact Bobby L. Puryear, Graduate Advisor, 
Economics and Business, Box 8109, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, 
NC 27695-8109, phone (919) 737-7157. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ACC 480 Accelerated Survey of Financial and Management Accounting. Credit 
may not be received for both ACC ^80 and ACC 220, 280 or ^69. Intended for graduate 
students and advanced undergraduates not in Economics and Business. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 401 Economic Analysis for Nonmajors. Preq.: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 404 Money, Financial Markets, and the Economy. Preq.: EB 302. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 410 Public Finance. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 413 Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. 

EB 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance. Preq.: EB 303 or 310. 3(2-2) F. 

EB420 Financial ManagementofCorporations. Pregs.;£'520i or ^i^andACC^eOor 
265. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 422 Investments and Portfolio Management. Preqs.: EB (ST) 350 or ST 31 1 and 

EB 320. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 425 Quantitative Methods for Management. Preqs.: EB 201 or 212 and EB (ST) 
350. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 430 Agricultural Price Analysis. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 431 Labor Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 435 Urban Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 436 Environmental Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. 

EB 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas. Preq.: EB 202 or 212. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 448 International Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 451 Introduction to Econometrics. Preqs.: EB 301, 302, 350. 3(3-0) F. 

EB (HI) 470 The Japanese Economy. Preqs.: EB 301; 3 hours HI. 3(3-0) S. 

EB 475 Comparative Economic Systems. Preq.: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB (TX) 482 Textile Marketing Management. Preqs.: EB 301, EB 313, TX 380. 3(2-2) 
F,S. 



120 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ACC 520 Advanced Management Accounting. Preqs.: ACC 1^80, EB(ST) S50 and EB 
501. 3(3-0) S. Uses of accounting data for management decisions within the firm; applica- 
tions of formal analytical models including decision theory, statistical analysis of cost 
behavior and optimization models; management and control of decentralized operations; 
and design and evaluation of accounting systems. Graduate Staff 

EB 501 Price Theory. Preqa.: MA 113 and EB301. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. An intensive analysis 
of the determination of prices and of market behavior, including demand, cost and produc- 
tion, pricing under competitive conditions and pricing under monopoly and other imper- 
fectly competitive conditions. Graduate Staff 

EB 502 Income and Employment Theory. Preqs.: EB 301, EB 302, EB (ST) 350, MA 
113. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Determinants of national income, employment, wages, the interest 
rate and inflation. Emphasis on the real (as opposed to monetary) determinants of these 
variables and on the microfoundations of modern macroeconomics. Discussion of monetary 
and fiscal policy and stochastic elements in income determination. Graduate Staff 

EB (RRA) 503 Economics of Recreation. 3(3-0) F. (See recreation resources adminis- 
tration.) 

EB 504 Monetary and Financial Macroeconomics.Preg'..- EB 502. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Financial and monetary determinants of national income and employment and the levels of 
wages, the interest rate and inflation. Emphasis on the money supply and the banking 
system. Special topics include banking regulation, budgetary deficits and the dynamics of 
money stock determination. D. Fisher, Pearce 

EB 512 Law and Economics. Preq.: EB 301 or EB UOl. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An economic 
analysis of the sources and effects of law, including common law, statutory law and 
regulation. Topics discussed include property rights and contracts, liability rules, crime 
and punishment, statutory enactment, bureaucratic behavior and institutional reform. 

Baumer, Knoeber 

EB 513 Research Methods in Marketing. Preqs.: EB 313, EB 350, EB 501. 3(3-0) S. A 
systematic approach to the structure, implementation and analysis of marketing research 
for decision making. Models of consumer demand and firm behavior analyzed in a market- 
ing context. Gerstner, Liebowitz 

EB 515 Environmental and Resource Policy. Preq.: EB 301 or EB IfOl. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Application of price theory and benefit-cost analysis to public decisions related to 
resources and the environment. Emphasis on evaluation of water supply and recreation 
investments, water quality management alternatives, public-sector pricing, common 
property resources and optimum management of forest and energy resources. 

Palmquist, Rucker 

EB 520 Managerial Finance: Theory and Applications. Preqs.: EB Jf20 and EB 301 or 
AOL 3(3-0) F,S. The foundations of finance theory and the empirical evidence available 
regarding the theory. Applications of basic finance theory, including capital budgeting, 
markets, valuation, cost of capital, financing alternatives, dividend policy and manage- 
ment of liquid assets. The micro-finance decisions made by a firm, primarily the invest- 
ment, financing and dividend decisions. Jones, Mitchell 

EB 521 Markets and Trade. Preq.: EB 301 or Wl. 3(3-0) F. This course emphasizes the 
space, form and time dimensions of market price and the location and produce combination 
decisions of firms. Consideration given to the way in which non-price factors and public 
policy choices influence firm behavior and the efficiency of marketing systems. Application 
of these models to agricultural, industrial and public service questions emphasized, includ- 
ing the relationships between resource availability and the spatial arrangement of eco- 
nomic activity. Dahle, King 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 121 

EB 522 Portfolio and Capital Market Theory. Preqs.: EB 501 and EB 350 or ST 311. 
3(3-0) F. Portfolio theory and its applications, plus capital market theory and the equili- 
brium pricing of financial assets. The role of securities, utility theory and analysis of 
secondary markets and their efficiency and the definition and measurement of returns and 
risks. Valuing securities, including options contracts. Jones, Mitchell 

EB 523 Planning Farm and Area Adjustments. Preqs.: EB 301, 303 or UOl. 3(2-2) S. 
Alt. yrs. The application of economic principles to production problems on typical farms in 
the state; methods and techniques of economic analysis of the farm business; application of 
research findings to production decisions; development of area agricultural programs. 

Graduate Staff 

EB 524 Financial Markets. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. The economic characteristics of 
financial markets and instruments: determination of interest rates; structure of domestic 
financial markets; flow of funds; nature of financial institutions; nature of financial 
instruments; and financial market behavior. Jones, Mitchell 

EB525 ManagerialEconomics. Preq.: EB 301 or J^01. 3(3-0) S. Applications of economic 
theory to the study of selected business practices in realms of finance, marketing, and 
management decision making. Specific topics have included: capital budgeting, financial 
structure, government regulation of industry, pricing strategies, tie-in sales, contractual 
arrangements between manufacturers and retailers, comparisons of managerial behavior 
in nonprofit or government enterprise to that in for-profit firms. Holthausen, Margolis 

EB 526 Human Resource Management. Preq.: EB301. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Application of 
decision-making techniques and economic models to problems of human resource man- 
agement. Problems, causes and solutions analyzed in relationship to maximizing profits. 
Nature and impact of government regulations on human resource management. 

Allen, Clark, Wessels 

EB 532 Economics of Trade Unions. Preq.: EB 301 or Wl- 3(3-0) F. An examination of 
the growth of the trade union movement in the United States. Primary consideration given 
to the impact of unions on the economy through their influence on wages, prices, employ- 
ment and resource allocation. Other topics include the relationship between the govern- 
ment and unions, the changing compensation mix and the recent growth in public employee 
unionism. Allen, Clark 

EB 533 Economics of World Food and Agricultural Policy. Preq.: EB 301 or JkOl. 
3(3-0) F. Economic analysis of the causes and effects of agricultural policies commonly 
applied in developed, developing and planned economies. Emphasis on economic models of 
policy analysis. Examination of the impact of commodity, farm imput, international trade, 
consumer and general economic policies on agriculture and the whole economy. Effects of 
policy on income distribution and economic development. P. Johnson, Sumner 

EB 540 Economic Development. Preq.: EB 301 orWl. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. An examination of 
the problems encountered in promoting regional and national economic development. 
Consideration given to the structural changes required for raising standards of living. 
Some basic principles of economics applied to suggest ways of achieving development goals. 
Topics include planning strategies, policies and external assistance. Sumner 

EB 551 Agricultural Production Economics. Preqs.: MA 113 and EB 301 or EB Wl. 

3(3-0) S. An economic analysis of agricultural production including: production functions, 
cost functions, programming and decision-making principles. Applications of these princi- 
ples to farm and regional resources allocation, and to the distribution of income to and 
within agriculture. Carlson, Perrin 

EB 560 Marketing Management and Strategy. Preq.: EB AOl or EB 501. 3(3-0) F. 
Analytical approach to marketing problems facing business firms and nonprofit organiza- 
tions. Emphasis on management decision making and societal issues. Topics include mar- 
keting concepts, economic environment, marketing strategy and research, buyer behavior, 



122 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

market segmentation and target marketing, product development and management, mar- 
keting and public policy, pricing strategies, channels of distribution, advertising and sales 
promotions. Gerstner, Liebowitz 

EB (ST) 561 Intermediate Econometrics. Preqs.: EB 501 and ST 513. 3(3-0) S. The 
formalization of economic hypotheses into testable relationships and the application of 
appropriate statistical techniques emphasized. Major attention be given to procedures 
applicable for single equation stochastic models expressing microeconomic and macroeco- 
nomic relationships. Statistical considerations relevant in working with time series and 
cross sectional data in economic investigations covered. Survey of simultaneous equation 
models and the available estimation techniques. McDermed, Thurman 

EB 565 Mathematical Methods for Economics. Preqs.: EB 501, MA 231 or equivalent, 
introductory course in linear algebra. 3(3-0) S. Linear algebra and matrices, optimization 
with equality and inequality constraints, comparative statics, differential and difference 
equations, intertemporal optimization. Economic applications to utility and profit maxi- 
mization, national income determination, economic growth, business cycles. 

Fackler, Hess 

EB 570 Analysis of American Economic History. Preq.: EB (HI) 371 orgrad. standing 
or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Stresses the application of economic analysis to the 
formulation and testing of hypotheses concerning economic growth and development in the 
historical context. Problems selected for analysis drawn primarily from American eco- 
nomic history. Sylla 

EB (TX) 585 Market Research in Textiles. 3(3-0) S. (See textile materials and 
management.) 

EB 590 Special Economics Topics. Preq.: CI. Maximum 6. F,S,Sum. An examination of 
current problems on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content varies as changing condi- 
tions require new approaches to deal with emerging problems. Graduate Staff 

EB 598 Topical Problems in Economics. Preq.: CI. 1-6. F,S,Sum. An investigation of 
topics of particular interest to advanced students under faculty direction on a tutorial basis. 
Credits and content vary with student needs. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EB 600 Advanced Price Theory. Preqs.: EB 501, MA 212. 3(3-0) F. Theory of consumer 
behavior. Derivation of individual and market demand curves. Consumer surplus. Deriva- 
tion of firm and market supply curves. Equilibrium and price determination in a market 
economy. Consideration of alternative market structures. Hess, Palmquist 

EB 601 Prices, Value and Welfare. Preq.: EB 600. 3(3-0) S. Production and duality 
theory. The demand for and supply of factors of production. Theories of capital and interest. 
Welfare economics topics, including externalities, compensation, public goods and the 
social welfare function. General equilibrium. Rucker, Thurman 

EB 602 Advanced Income and Employment Theory. Preq.: EB 502. 3(3-0) F. An 
analysis of the forces determining the level of income and employment; a review of some of 
the theories of economic fluctuations; and a critical examination of a selected macroeco- 
nomic system. Rossana, Seater 

EB 603 History of Economic Thought. Preqs.: EB 501 and 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
Sum. Alt. yrs. A systematic analysis of the development and cumulation of economic 
thought, designed in part to provide a sharper focus and more adequate perspective for the 
understanding of contemporary economics. D. Fisher 

EB 604 Monetary Economics. Preq.: EB 602. 3(3-0) S. Consideration of the money 
market and portfolio management, the cost of capital, effects of monetary phenomena on 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 123 

investment and accumulation of wealtli with emphasis throughout on problems arising 
from uncertainty; general equilibrium theory of money, interest, prices and output. 

D. Fisher, Lapp, Pearce 

EB 606 Industrial Organization and Control. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) F. Microeconomic 
theory is applied to the empirical analysis of public policies that affect the efficiency of 
resource allocation in the U. S. economy. Special attention is given to the interrelationships 
between industrial structure, conduct and performance. Flath, Margolis 

EB 610 Theory of Public Finance. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An application of 
microeconomic theory and welfare economics to the public sector. Topics include externali- 
ties and public policy, the theory of public goods, collective choice, program budgeting and 
cost-benefit analysis, the theory of taxation and its application to tax policy, public debt, 
and fiscal federalism. Hyman 

EB 615 Environmental and Resource Economics. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. The theoret- 
ical tools and empirical techniques necessary for an understanding of resource and envir- 
onmental economics, developed in both a static and dynamic framework. Discussions of the 
causes of environmental problems, possible policies and approaches to nonmarket valua- 
tion. Analysis of resource use over time using control theory for both renewable and 
exhaustible resources. Palmquist, Rucker, Smith 

EB 625 Long Range Planning in Business and Industry. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. 
Theory and practice of long range planning in business and industry. Case discussions and 
intensive readings dealing with techniques for identifying opportunities and risks in the 
environment of the firm, determining corporate strengths and weaknesses, specifying long 
range strategy. Special attention is given to the roles of management and the internal 
processes of large organizations as the organizations respond to changes in external 
conditions. Holthausen, Newmark 

EB 630 Labor Economics. Preqs.: EB 501 and one of the following: EB (ST) 561, ST If22, 
ST 512, ST 51 7. 3(3-0) F. Application of microeconomic theory and econometric methods to 
labor market behavior in both static and dynamic contexts. Topics include labor demand 
analysis, labor force participation, hours of work, household production, human capital, 
distribution of earnings, information and search, and mobility. Allen, Fearn 

EB 631 Policy and Research Issues in Labor Economics. Preqs.: EB 501 and one of the 

following: EB (ST) 561, ST h22, ST 512, ST 51 7. 3(3-0) S. Survey of current literature on 
policy-related issues in labor economics, including trade union behavior, unemployment, 
macroeconomic aspects of labor market adjustment, discrimination, regulation of wages 
and benefits and public-sector labor markets. Examples from labor markets in the U. S. 
and developing countries. Recent research developments in labor economics, topics to vary 
according to the interests and needs of students. Allen, Clark 

EB 640 Advanced Economic Development. Preqs.: EB 501, 502, 5A0. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
An analysis of the factors determining the growth of poorer countries and regions of 
countries. Consideration given to issues that have arisen in current theoretical and empiri- 
cal bases for policy decisions. Included in the latter elements are the quantitative founda- 
tions for planned and programmed development. Applications of alternative planning 
methods evaluated. King, Sumner 

EB 641 Agricultural Production and Supply. Preqs.: EB 501 and ST 513. 3(3-0) F. An 
advanced study in the logic of, and empirical inquiry into, producer behavior and choice 
among combinations of factors and kinds and qualities of output; aggregative consequences 
of individuals' and firms' decisions in terms of product supply and factor demand; factor 
markets and income distribution; and general interdependency amongeconomic variables. 

Carlson, Perrin, Sumner 

EB 642 Consumption, Demand and Market Interdependency. Preqs.: EB 501 and ST 
513. 3(3-0) S. An analysis of the behavior of individual households and of consumers in the 



124 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

aggregate with respect to consumption of agricultural products; the impact of these deci- 
sions on demand for agricultural resources, the competition among agricultural regions 
and for markets; and the interdependence between agriculture and other sectors of the 
economy. Thurman, Wohlgenant 

EB 648 Theory of International Trade. Preqs.: EB 501, 502. 3(3-0) S. A consideration of 
the specialized body of economic theory dealing with the international movement of goods, 
services, capital and payments. Also, a theoretically oriented consideration of policy. 

Button, P. Johnson 

EB649 Monetary Aspects of International Trade. Pre?..- £"5 502. 5^5-o;F. Study of the 

macroeconomic problems of an open economy including the balance of payments adjust- 
ment mechanism, alternative exchange rate systems, external effects of monetary and 
fiscal policy, optimum currency areas and international monetary reform. Grennes 

EB 650 Economic Decision Theory. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Study of general 
theories of choice. Structure of decision problems, the role of information; formulation of 
objectives. Current research problems. Hess, Holthausen 

EB (ST) 651 Econometrics. Preqs.: EB 600, STA21, ST 502. 3(3-0) F. The role and uses of 
statistical inference in economic research; the problem of spanning the gap from an 
economic model to its statistical counterpart; measurement problems and their solutions 
arising from the statistical model and the nature of the data; limitations and interpretation 
of results of economic measurement from statistical techniques. Hall, Smith 

EB (ST) 652 Topics in Econometrics. Preq.: EB (ST) 651. 3(3-0) S. Survey of current 
literature on estimation and inference in simultaneous stochastic equations systems. Tech- 
niques for combining cross section and time series data including covariance, error corre- 
lated and error component models. Lag models and inference in dynamic systems. Produc- 
tion functions, productivity measurement and hypotheses about economic growth. Com- 
plete and incomplete prior information in regression analysis. Nonlinear estimation in 
economic models. Gallant, Schrimper 

EB 682 Advanced Macroeconomics. Preq.: EB 602. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Advanced study 
of macroeconomics. Emphasis on business cycles and behavior of real variables. Topics 
include: real, incomplete information and disequilibrium theories of the business cycle; 
rational expectations; contract theory and indexation; investment; and the effects of 
government expenditure, taxes and debt. Rossana, Seater 

EB 684 Monetary Theory. Preqs.: EB 600, 601, 602, 60A. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Advanced 
study of micro- and macro-economic theories of the role of money in the economy. Primary 
emphasis on money demand and monetary growth models. Specific areas explored include: 
traditional and recent developments in both asset and transactions theory and rational 
expectations and optimal policy. Discussion of the empirical record included for most 
topics. D. Fisher, Pearce 

EB 699 Research in Economics. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. Individual 
research in economics under staff supervision and direction. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



125 



Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 
Professor J. J. Michael, Dean 



The following master's degree programs are offered by the School of Edu- 
cation: 

Adult and Community College Education 

Agricultural Education 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

Guidance and Personnel Services 

Higher Education Administration 

Industrial Arts Education 

Mathematics Education 

Middle Grades Education 

Occupational Education 

Psychology 

Science Education 

Special Education 

Vocational Industrial Education 



Students accepted into any of the above education programs may seek either 
the Master of Science degree or the Master of Education degree; students admit- 
ted to the Department of Psychology seek the Master of Science degree. The 
Master of Science degree is research-oriented and is preparation for further 
graduate study. The Master of Education is a professional degree which allows 
for wider latitude in the choice of course work than is allowed by the Master of 
Science program. 

The College of Education and Psychology also offers certification programs at 
the intermediate (sixth-year) level in the following fields: 

Agricultural Education 

Community College Administration 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

Educational Gerontology 

School Counseling 

Mathematics Education 

Occupational Education 

School Psychology 

Science Education 

Special Education 

Vocational Industrial Education 



126 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The following doctoral programs are offered by the College of Education and 
Psychology: 

Adult and Community College Education Ed.D. 

Curriculum and Instruction Ed.D. 

Educational Administration and Supervision Ed.D. 

Guidance and Personnel Services Ed.D. 

Higher Education Administration Ed.D. 

Industrial Arts Education Ed.D. 

Mathematics Education Ph.D. 

Occupational Education* Ed.D. 

Psychology Ph.D. 

Science Education Ph.D. 

All doctoral programs require a minimum of one year of full-time resident 
study. 

Graduate programs are planned by the student and his or her committee in 
terms of the student's educational and career objectives, experience and previous 
preparation. 

Prior to consideration of an application for admission, the following must have 
been received: completed application form, an official copy of current (not more 
than three years old) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores or Miller 
Analogies Test score, official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
courses taken and at least three completed recommendation forms. In most 
programs an interview is required. Psychology requires both the GRE Advanced 
Test and the Miller Analogies Test. Individual programs may have additional 
requirements for admission. In order to maintain personalized, quality graduate 
programs, each program can enroll only a limited number of students regardless 
of the qualifications of the applicants. 

The College of Education and Psychology is housed in Poe Hall, a modern 
building with up-to-date research and instructional facilities, including: 

Curriculum Materials Center— The Curriculum Materials Center, adminis- 
tered by the College of Education and Psychology, is located in Poe Hall. The 
center maintains a collection of educational materials with particular emphasis 
on teaching methods, research, administration and psychology and includes 
films, filmstrips, slides, audiotapes, video cassettes and simulation games. A 
special collection of materials about developing nations is also maintained. Audi- 
ovisual equipment is available for previewing materials in the center. Micro- 
computer.^ for teaching and research are a part of this facility. The center 
acquires textbooks adopted by the State Board of Education for secondary level 
subjects as well as other selected textbooks and reference materials. The mission 
of the center is to support programs in the College of Education and Psychology, 
and the center's use by campus personnel outside of the College is limited. 

Instructional Materials Production Center — Education, instruction and com- 
munication require the clear and effective presentation of content. The Instruc- 
tional Materials Production Center (IMPC) aids this requirement through the 
design and production of instructional and informational materials in a range of 
formats. Although resources and personnel of the IMPC predominantly serve 

•Students in agrricultural education or industrial and technical education would seek the Ed.D. in occupational education. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 127 

faculty, students and projects of the the College of Education and Psychology, 
increasing requests for materials from the University and beyond are met as 
possible on a contract basis. 

The IMPC is directed by two instructional designers, faculty members of the 
College of Education and Psychology which is unique in having a production 
facility in which two persons of such training function full time as designers, 
producers and consultants. Other personnel in the facility serve as teaching 
assistants, graphic designers or are hired for the special needs of certain projects. 
Personnel work through the process of instructional design with those persons 
having a communicational need— faculty members, content specialists or project 
directors. Careful application of this process is necessary in order to determine 
what materials and strategies best serve the interrelated considerations of goals, 
objectives, content, users, audience, cost and available resources and is also 
necessary if final products are to be as lucid in design as in educational soundness. 
Formats in which materials are developed include: print, overhead transparen- 
cies, graphic imagery, displays and exhibits, signage, photography, slides, slide- 
tape presentations and in some cases videotape. 

Office of Publications— This office prints and publishes instructional materials 
developed by faculty and students, as well as by public school teachers associated 
with various School programs. 

The Computing Facility is a laboratory and two adjacent classrooms equipped 
with microcomputers and with terminals and televideos linked to University 
computing facilities and the Triangle Universities Computing Center (TUCC). 
The facility is used for faculty research and development, student projects, 
graphics instruction, in-service teacher training workshops and training. 

Other Special Facilities— Foe Hall also houses an extensive variety of shops 
(metal, wood, ceramic, electrical and photography); counseling and testing cen- 
ters; several laboratories for the study of human behavior; an animal room; and a 
standardized test library. 

Adult and Community College Education 

Adult and community college education is a component of both the College of 
Education and Psychology and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. For 
a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see adult and com- 
munity college education. 

Agricultural Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor L. R. Jewell, Coordinator 

Professor: J. K. Coster; Professor Emeritus: C. C. Scarborough; Associate Profes- 
sors Emeriti: C. D. Bryant, T. R. Miller; Assistant Professors: J. L. Flowers, B. 
J. Malpiedi 

The agricultural education program offers study leading to the Master of 
Science and the Master of Education degrees and to the intermediate (sixth-year) 



128 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

certificate. Both master's programs require a minimum of 36 semester hours 
which reflect the student's background and career expectations and which meet 
the approval of the student's advisory committee. Graduate programs are 
designed to meet the needs of individual students for further study and research 
as well as to prepare them for educational leadership roles in teaching, adminis- 
tration, supervision and research in agricultural education. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture. 3(3-0) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

Counselor Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. C. Locke, Head 

Professors: E. R. Gerler Jr., L. K. Jones, N. A. Sprinthall; Professors Emeriti: W. 
E. Hopke, C. G. Morehead; Associate Professor: H. A. Exum; Visiting Associate 
Professor: T. H. Stafford Jr.; Associate Professor Emeriti: J. G. McVay, B. C. 
TaWey Jr.; Assistant Professor:!). D. Saidla; Visiting Assistant Professor: C. L. 
Oglesby; Adjunct Assistant Professor: R. F. Anderson 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Science, Master of Educa- 
tion and Doctor of Education degrees as well as to the sixth-year certificate, with 
a major in the field of guidance and personnel services. Each of these degrees is 
designed to prepare individuals for guidance and personnel positions at various 
levels in elementary and secondary schools, junior and community colleges, trade 
and technical schools and institutes, institutions of higher education and com- 
munity agencies. The student may specialize in one of several areas depending 
upon individual career goals. 

It is desirable for an applicant to have had undergraduate or graduate course 
work in humanities, social and behavioral sciences as well as work experience in 
a human development context. Students accepted into the department are those 
who anticipate devoting full- or part-time to guidance and personnel work. 

Admission requirements for the department are a minimum of a B average in 
the junior and senior years of undergraduate work; satisfactory scores on the 
aptitude section of the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogies 
Test; three satisfactory letters of recommendation in regard to previous educa- 
tion and employment experiences, personal characteristics and emotional 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 129 

maturity. An interview and work sample are also required for doctoral 
admission. 

For descriptions of the guidance and personnel courses listed below, see educa- 
tion courses. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 520 Introduction to Counseling. 3(3-0) F,Sum. 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

ED 524 Career Counseling and Development. 3(3-0) SySum. 

ED 530 Theories and Techniques of Counseling. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 533 Guidance and Counseling in the Secondary Schools. M3-1) F. 

ED 534 Guidance and Counseling in Elementary and Middle Schools. M3-1) F. 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 553 Community Service Agencies. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 590 Special Problems in Guidance. Maximum 6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 625 Cross Cultural Counseling. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 631 Vocational Development Theory. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work. 1-3 F,S. 

ED 637 Seminar in Cognitive-Developmental Theory and Practice. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 638 Seminar in Cognitive-Developmental Research. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 639 Group Counseling. 3(3-0) F,Sum. 

ED 640 Laboratory Experiences in Counseling. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 641A Practicum in Counseling. 2-6 S. 

ED 666 Supervision of Counseling. 3(1-8) F,S. 

ED 686 Professional Issues in Counseling. 1-3 F,S, Alt. yrs. 



130 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Curriculum and Instruction 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. L. Crossland, Head 

Professors: D. A. Cullinan, P. H. Martorella, B. M. Parramore; Associate Profes- 
sors: J. F. Arnold, B. J. Fox, C. W. Harper Jr., R. J. Pritchard, L. Thies- 
Sprinthall. E. S. Vasu; Professor Emeritus: C. C. Scarborough; Associate Pro- 
fessor EmeritiLs: P. J. Rust; Assistant Professors: C. A. Pope, H. A. Spires; 
Visiting Assistant Professor: L. G. Aubrecht; Adjunct Assistant Professors: D. 
D. Copeland, M. D. Durfee, N. D. LeV ere; Assistant Professor Emeritus: K. A. 
McCutchen 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Education, Master of 
Science and Doctor of Education degrees. A sixth-year program leading to 
certification is also available. Those completing the master's program may qual- 
ify for a graduate teaching certificate in an area of specialization or for a 
supervisor's certificate. 
Students may specialize in one of several areas: 

Curriculum development and supervision 

English and language arts education 

Elementary education— intermediate grades 

Instructional technology — computers 

Middle years education 

Reading education 

Social studies education 

Special education 

Supervision 
Graduate programs are designed for those who plan to qualify as supervisors, 
instructional specialists, curriculum developers, teacher educators and consul- 
tants at preschool through university levels. Graduates may enter positions in 
public schools, service agencies, higher education institutions and industries. 

In addition to meeting the requirements of the Graduate School, applicants 
must provide evidence of satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion and/or Miller Analogies Test; submit a written statement of professional 
goals; and arrange for a departmental interview upon request. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional Media. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing. 
S(S-O) F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 501 Computer Applications in Instruction. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 502 The School Curriculum. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 504 Social Studies in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 131 

ED 506 Education of Exceptional Children. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 507 Foundations of Middle Years Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 508 Education of Severely Handicapped. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 509 Methods and Materials Teaching Retarded Children. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 513 Introduction to Issues and Techniques in Visual Impairments. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 519 Early Childhood Education. 3(1-Jf) S. 

ED 523 Orientation and Mobility of the Visually Impaired. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 531 Mental Retardation. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 536 Structure and Function of the Eye and Use of Low Vision. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 540 Career/Vocational Education for the Handicapped. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 542 Contemporary Approaches in the Teaching of Social Studies. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 544 The Teaching of Composition. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 545 Reading in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 546 Reading in the Content Areas. 3(3-0) S,Su'm. 

ED 547 Language Arts in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 548 Development of Microcomputer Software for Instruction. 3(3-1) F. 

ED 551 Principles and Practices of Supervision. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 556 Learning Disabilities. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 557 Methods and Materials in Learning Disabilities. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 558 Resource Teaching in Special Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 560 Teaching Through the Arts. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 561 Educational Diagnosis and Prescription for Exceptional Children. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 562 Communication Disorders in the Classroom. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 563 Effective Teaching. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 564 Classroom Management in Special Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 571 Introduction to the Gifted Individual. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 572 Methods for Teaching the Gifted. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 573 Behavior Disorders. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 574 Methods and Materials Behavior Disorders. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 576 Teaching/Learning Approaches for Emerging Adolescents. 3(3-0) S. 



132 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 582 Teaching Braille and Communication Skills. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 583 Design and Evaluation of Instructional Materials. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 586 Methods and Materials in Visual Impairments. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 591 Teaching Literature for Young Adults. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 598 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 602 Curriculum Theory and Development. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 606 Remediation of Reading Disabilities. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 634 Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 64 IB Diagnostic-Prescriptive Practicum in Reading. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 64 IC Practicum in Special Education. 1-6 F,S. 

ED 641G Practicum in Middle Years Education. 3-6 F,S. 

ED 64 IK Practicum in Supervision. 3-6 F,S. 

ED 641M Practicum in Instructional Technology— Computers. 3-6 F,S. 

ED 642 Research Applications in Curriculum and Instruction. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 648 Theory and Process in Reading and Language Arts. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 665 Supervising Student Teachers. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 687 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction. 1-3 S. 

Educational Leadership and Program Evaluation 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. G. Taylor Jr., Head 

Professors: B. G. Beezer, C. J. Dolce; Adjunct Professors: C. R. Coble, A. A, 
Glatthorn; Associate Professors: W. B. Harvey, B. MacPhail-Wilcox, R. C. 
Serow; Visiting Associate Professor: R. H. Forbes; Adjunct Associate Profes- 
sor: J. S. Pressley; Visiting Assistant Professor: J. I. Dreyden; Lecturer: R. T. 
Williams 

The graduate programs in educational administration and supervision have a 
multidisciplinary emphasis which includes courses in economics, politics, psy- 
chology and sociology as well as in professional education. Within the constraints 
required for certification, programs are planned individually, based on an analy- 
sis of the student's career objectives and competencies. 

The master's degree programs (M.S., M.Ed.), which require a minimum of 30 
or 36 credit hours, are designed to prepare individuals for entry-level adminis- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 133 

trative positions in public schools, colleges and other educational agencies. The 
master's program must be completed within four years from the semester of 
admission. A principal's certificate program is available for students who 
already hold a master's degree in a related field and who wish to obtain a first 
administrative credential for public school service. An intermediate (sixth-year 
certificate) program, which leads to the second level of certification, is also 
available for public school personnel. 

The doctoral degree program (Ed.D.), which requires extensive work in 
research and clinical practice (internship), is designed to prepare individuals for 
advanced administrative and supervisory positions in public schools, education 
service agencies, education policy positions and higher education. One academic 
year of full-time residency is required. The doctoral program must be completed 
within six years from the semester of admission. In addition, an Ed.D. degree in 
elementary and secondary administration is offered in Greenville, NC, in cooper- 
ation with East Carolina University. 

In addition to admission requirements of the Graduate School, there are two 
additional requirements: a recent Graduate Record Examination score (both 
verbal and quantitative) or a Miller's Analogy Test and a narrative statement 
which describes in detail the applicant's career objectives and specific objectives 
for enrolling in the graduate program. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 514 Formative Ideas in American Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 515 Education and Social Diversity. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. 

ED 517 Current Issues in Higher Education. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 518 Introduction to Education Law. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 532 Introduction to Educational Inquiry. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 54 IB Practicum in Education Administration. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

ED 550 Principles of Educational Administration. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 569 The Principalship. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 578 Law and Higher Education. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 580 Evaluation Theory and Practice in Education. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 607 The Politics of Higher Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 614 Contemporary Educational Thought. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. 

ED 616 History of Higher Education in the United States. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 618 School Law for the Administrator. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 620 Cases in Educational Administration. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. 



134 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 632 Applied Research Methods in Education. 3(1-It) F. 

ED 697 Problems of Research Design in Education. 1-3 F,S,Sum. 

Industrial and Technical Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor E. L Farmer, Coordinator 

Professors Emeriti: D. M. Hanson, J. T. Nerden; Associate Professor Emerittis: F. 
S. Smith; Assistant Professor Emeritiis: T. C. Shore Jr. 

The program in industrial and technical education provides graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Master of Education and to the 
intermediate (sixth-year) certificate in vocational industrial education. The 
rapid development of industrial and technical education in North Carolina and 
throughout the nation provides opportunities for teachers, supervisors and 
administrators who have earned advanced degrees. 

The facilities at the University allow supporting courses at the graduate level 
in the related fields of computer science, economics and business, engineering, 
guidance and personnel services, mathematics, psychology, sociology and statis- 
tics. The prerequisite for graduate work in the programs in industrial and 
technical education is a proficiency in the undergraduate courses required for 
the bachelor's degree in industrial or technical education or a substantial 
equivalent. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ED 421 Principles and Practices in Industrial Cooperative Training. Preqs.:ED327, 
3UU, 305. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES* 

ED 525 Advanced Trade Analysis and Course Construction. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Industrial and Technical Education Programs. 

3(3-0) F. 

Industrial Arts Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor R. E. Peterson, Coordinator 

Professors: B. G. Beezer, C.J. Dolce; Visiting Professor: A. A. Glatthorn; Adjunct 
Professors: V. W. DeLuca, W. J. Haynie III 

•For other courses, see occupational education. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 135 

The industrial arts education program offers graduate work leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science, Master of Education and Doctor of Education. 
Graduate programs are designed for teachers who wish to develop their instruc- 
tional competencies and for those who wish to be supervisors and administrators 
of industrial arts programs. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

I A 510 Design for Industrial Arts Teachers. Preqs.: Six hours of drawing, lA 231 or 
eqtdvalent. 3(2-2) Sum. A study of new developments in the field of design with emphasis on 
the relationship of material and form in the selection and designing of industrial arts 
projects. Graduate Staff 

lA 560 New Developments in Industrial Arts Education. Preqs.: Twelve hours of 
education and teaching experience. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course is a study of the new 
developments in industrial arts education. It is designed to assist teachers and administra- 
tors in developing new concepts and new content based on the changes in technology. 

Graduate Staff 

I A 582 Visual Communications in Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: Advanced stand- 
ing in lAE or CI. 3(2-2) S. Alt. yrs. Designed to enable teachers to understand key technical 
developments in the area of visual communications. Emphasis is upon developing pilot 
testing and evaluating a sequence of laboratory activities for school environment. 

Peterson 

ED 588 Advanced Teaching Methods in Industrial Arts Educa.tion.3(2-2) F,Sum. 

lA 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts. Preqs.: Sr. standing, CI. Maximum 6. 
F,S,Sum. Courses based on individual problems and designed to give advanced majors in 
industrial arts education the opportunity to broaden or intensify their knowledge and 
abilities through investigation and research in the various fields of industrial arts, such as 
metals, plastics, ceramics or electricity-electronics. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts. 2(2-0) F,S. 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts. 2(2-0) F,S. 

I A 645 Technology and Industrial Arts. Preqs.: I A 560, ED 630. 3(3-0) F,S. Technology: 
its nature, origins, advance. Impact of technological advance on man and culture. Technol- 
ogy as the material culture. Changing concepts of work, skill, occupations, discretionary 
time. Technology and its relation to industrial arts education. Graduate Staff 

ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education. 1(1-0) F,S. 



Mathematics and Science Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor B. G. Beezer, Acting Head 

Professors: N. D. Anderson, L. M. Clark, J. R. Kolb; Professor Emeritus: H. E. 
Speece; Associate Professors: L. V. Stiff, W. M. Waters Jr., L. W. Watson, J. H. 
Wheatley; Associate Professor Emeritus: H. A. Shannon; Assistant Professors: 
K. S. Norwood, J. C. Park; Visiting Assistant Professor: S. B. Berenson 



136 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Department of Mathematics and Scier; ? Education offers graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science, Master of Education and Doctor of 
Philosophy with majors in mathematics education or in science education and 
intermediate level certification in both fields. Each student's program is individ- 
ually planned by a graduate committee and will reflect the student's undergrad- 
uate and graduate preparation, teaching experience and future professional 
plans. Students take courses in both professional education and in their teaching 
specialties. Areas of specialization include mathematics, biological sciences, 
earth science, chemistry and physics. 

Doctoral students are required to have a reading knowledge of one modern 
foreign language. Additional communication skills may be required by the ad- 
visory committee. Independent reading and participation in seminars are an 
indispensable part of the doctoral program. The heart of the program is the 
dissertation, a document based on original research that makes a significant 
contribution to science education or mathematics education. 

Applicants must meet the admissions requirements of the Graduate School and 
have departmental approval. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure, and Processes for the 
Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. yrs. 

ED 512 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Junior High School. 3(3-0) 
S,Sum. Alt. yrs. 

ED 526 Teaching in College. 3(3-0) Sum. 

ED 570 Foundations of Mathematics Education. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. yrs. 

ED 575 Foundations of Science Education. 3(3-0) S,Su'm., Alt. yrs. 

ED 577 Improving Classroom Instruction in Science. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching. 1-3 F,S,Sum. 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Science in Higher Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Science and Mathematics. 

3(3-0) S. 

ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers of Mathematics and Science. 3(3-0) 
S. 

ED 64 ID Practicum in Science and Mathematics Education. 1-6 F,S. 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education. 2(2-0) F,S. 

ED 695 Seminar in Science Education. 2(2-0) F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 137 

Occupational Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. E. Moore, Head 

Associate Professor: L. R. Jewell, Graduate Administrator 

Professor: J. K. Coster; Professors Emeriti: D. M. Hanson, J. T. Nerden, D. W. 
Olson, C. C. Scarborough; Associate Professors: J . L. Burrow, L. S. Dillon, E. I. 
Farmer, R. E. Peterson, R. E. Wenig; Associate Professors Emeriti: C. D. 
Bryant, J. R. Clary, W. L. Cox Jr., T. R. Miller, F. S. Smith; Assistant Profes- 
sors: J. L. Crow, J. A. Davis, V. W. DeLuca, J. L. Flowers, W. J. Haynie III, B. J. 
Malpiedi. R. M. Patterson, W. J. Vander Wall; Visiting Assistant Prof essor: M. 
M. Turnbull; Adjunct Assistant Professors: C. B. Belcher, B. M. Patterson; 
Assistant Professor Emeritus: T. C. Shore Jr. 

The Department of Occupational Education includes programs leading to 
advanced degrees in the program areas of agricultural education, health occupa- 
tions education, industrial and technical education, and industrial arts educa- 
tion. For descriptions of the advanced degree programs in these areas, see earlier 
sections in education. In addition, the department offers advanced degree pro- 
grams in occupational education and courses leading to certification in the 
teaching of middle grades occupational exploration. 

This section of the catalog describes the advanced programs in occupational 
education per se; that is, programs in which the major is occupational education. 
The department offers leadership development programs in occupational educa- 
tion for the Master of Education and Master of Science degrees, the Intermediate 
(Sixth-Year) Program, and Doctor of Education degree. 

The master's programs are designed to prepare persons for entry-level admi- 
nistrative and supervisory positions in occupational education. However, stu- 
dents may prepare for other careers, such as master teachers of career explora- 
tion programs. 

The master's programs require a minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate 
work, including 27 hours in the major. Additional hours will be specified by the 
student's advisory committee for those who do not have a baccalaureate degree in 
an occupational education field. Students who elect the Master of Science substi- 
tute the thesis for part of the course load. 

The Intermediate (Sixth-Year) Program requires a minimum of 60 semester 
hours of graduate work, including 48 hours in the major. 

The primary purpose of the doctoral program is to prepare persons for 
advanced positions in occupational education. Students may elect to prepare for 
such positions as administrator, research specialist, curriculum development 
specialist or teacher educator in occupational education. A minimum number of 
90 semester hours of graduate work beyond the baccalaureate degree is specified 
for the doctoral program. Emphasis is placed on developing competencies, and 
students may be advised to supplement their course work. 

Applicants to the graduate level programs must take the Graduate Record 
Examination or the Miller Analogies Test and submit a resume of work expe- 



138 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

rience with a statement of career goals. Application processes must be completed 
within six months of the date the application is received. 

All doctoral programs require a minimum of one year of full-time resident 
status devoted to the program and programs must be completed within six years 
from the beginning of the semester in which the student is initially enrolled in the 
doctoral classification. Other department policies should be requested from the 
graduate administrator. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 516 Analysis of Occupational Information, Trends and the Labor Market. 3(3-0) 
S. 

ED 522 Career Exploration. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 541A Practicum in Occupational Education. 1-6 F,S. 

ED 593 Special Problems in Occupational Education. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Industrial and Technical Education Programs. 

3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ED 6 1 1 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting Occupational Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 612 Finance, Accounting, and Management of Occupational Education Pro- 
grams. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

ED 688 Research Application in Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 693 Advanced Special Problems in Occupational Education. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

Health Occupations Education 

Assistant Professor J. A. Davis, Coordinator 

The master's degree level program track in health occupations teacher educa- 
tion has been established in response to an increasing need for accountability in 
professional education and for qualified educators in the health fields. The pro- 
gram is designed to provide a broad comprehension of the health care delivery 
system and the education of future providers of service and to develop compet- 
ency in curriculum and instruction planning and implementation. Students 
desiring to move into administrative and supervisory roles are encouraged to 
design a plan of study consistent with their personal goals. Students must hold 
credentials in one of the health disciplines and have knowledge of the health care 
system. 

Students will be encouraged to participate in the interinstitutional cooperative 
program that exists between the Graduate Schools of North Carolina State 



I THE GRADUATE CATALOG 139 

University, Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
which makes available a vast array of offerings in the health field from which to 
select courses. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

ED 433 Health Occupations Specialty Practicum. Preq.: Current credential in a recog- 
nized health discipline. 6 Arranged. F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 555 Issues and Trends in Education for the Allied Health Professions. 3(3-0) Alt. 
yrs. 

ED 581 Curriculum and Instruction in the Allied Health Professions. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. 

ED 584 Health Care Delivery Systems and Environments. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 64 IJ Practicum in Health Occupations. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. 

Training and Development 

Associate Professor L. S. Dillon, Coordinator 

Human resource development is a field which deals with the quality of work 
life, productivity and the satisfaction and development of human resources. 
Within this field, nine distinct areas may be defined: organization development, 
organization and job design, planning, selection and staffing, personnel research, 
compensation and benefits, employee assistance, union and labor relations, and 
training and development. The focus of training and development is to identify 
and, through planned learning activities, help to develop the key competencies 
which enable individuals to perform current or future jobs. 

Students may pursue either the Master of Education or the Master of Science 
degree. Both degrees require a minimum of 36 hours. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 587 Organization and Operation of Training and Development Programs. 3(3- 
0)F. 

ED 595 Methods and Techniques of Training and Development. 3(3-0) S. 



Psychology 

For a listing of departmental faculty and courses, see psychology. 



140 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Education Courses 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 Community College and Two-year Postsecondary Education.Preg.. Grad. 
standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F,S. Comprehensive community colleges and technical 
institutes and the state systems of which they are a part: underlying concepts, educational 
needs they are designed to serve, role in meeting these needs, historical development, issues 
in the establishment and operation of state systems and individual institutions, unresolved 
issues and emerging trends. Graduate Staff 

ED 501 Computer Applications in Instruction. Preq.: Six hrs. ED orPSYor CI. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Emphasis on the use and evaluation of existing educational software and research 
findings with respect to the uses of computers in instruction. Martorella, Vasu 

ED 502 The School Curriculum. Preq.: 12 semester hrs. ED and PSYor CI. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of the origin, development, and current status of the elementary and secondary school 
curriculum and an evaluation of the trends and issues likely to influence the curriculum in 
the future. Parramore 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and Community College Education. 

Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. The principles and processes involved in programming, 
including basic theories and concepts supporting the programming process. Attention 
given to the general framework in which programming is done, the organization needed 
and the program roles of both professional and lay leaders. Boone 

ED 504 Social Studies in the Elementary School. Preq.: Six hrs. in ED. 3(3-0) F. 
Advanced professional training in the teaching of social studies for middle grades and 
elementary teachers, including an in-depth introduction to research-based teaching 
strategies, instructional resources and the literature of the field. Martorella 

ED 505 Group Process in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: Grad. 
standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) Sum. Application of research and theory in small group 
behavior to administration and teaching in adult and community college education set- 
tings. Opportunities provided for participants to experience various aspects of group 
behavior and to practice skills of group leadership applicable to various group situations. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 506 Education of Exceptional Children. Preq.: 9 hrs. of ED or PSY. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
An introduction to the field of Special Education. The course focuses on the historical 
overview, definitions and terminology in the basic areas of exceptionality; etiological 
factors in exceptionality; developmental and learningcharacteristicsof each area of excep- 
tionality; and educational settings and strategies employed in special education. A review 
given of current educational laws and policies affecting special education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 507 Foundations of Middle Years Education. Preq.: 6 hrs. of ED and PSY. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Five major aspects of middle years education examined: (a) the history and purposes of 
middle/junior high school, (b) pre- and early adolescent needs, interests and abilities, (c) 
curriculum design and content, (d) teaching methods and (e) school organization. Both 
theoretical understandings and effective classroom strategies emphasized. Arnold 

ED 508 Education of Severely Handicapped. Preq.: ED 531 or ED 57Jf or CI. 3(3-0) F. 
A study of severe and profound mental retardation and autism, including assessment 
procedures, educational and social/vocational programs, instructional strategies and eva- 
luation. Legal and ethical issues involved in working with the severely handicapped 
examined. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 141 

ED 509 Methods and Materials— Teaching Retarded Children. Preqs.: ED 506 and 
ED 531 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A study of the methods and materials related to teaching mentally 
retarded school age children. Course includes the study of the learning and behavioral 
characteristics and educational programs for the mentally retarded in the areas of motor, 
communications, social, academic and vocational development. Crossland 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, Contemporary Nature. Preqs.: 
Advanced undergrad., CI. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the historical and philosophical founda- 
tions of adult education from ancient times to the present, giving attention to key figures, 
issues, institutions, movements and programs, including consideration of the relationship 
between adult education's historical development and prevailing intellectual, social, eco- 
nomic and political conditions. Consideration of adult education's contemporary nature, 
present-day schools of thought on its objectives and trends. Carter 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure, and Processes for the 
Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary School. Preq.: Bachelor's degree in elemen- 
tary education or CI. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. yrs. Designed for teachers and supervisors of 
mathematics in the elementary or middle school. Special emphasis on implications of 
mathematical content, structure, and processes in teaching arithmetic and geometry. 

Waters, Watson 

ED 512 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Junior High School. Preq.: ED 
A71 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. yrs. Comprehensive study of teaching mathematics in 
elementary and junior high schools. Major emphasis on building skills in teaching arith- 
metic, elementary algebra and intuitive geometry. Thorough search of the literature 
relative to the mathematics curricula conducted, designing and sequencing of learning 
activities, teaching mathematical concepts and relationships, building skill in computa- 
tion, reading mathematics, problem solving and measurement covered. Kolb, Watson 

ED 513 Introduction to Issues and Techniques in Visual Impairments. Preq.: ED 506. 
3(3-0) F. Addresses historical developments, trends, issues and basic skill techniques for the 
visually impaired. Includes societal perceptions, societal integration, effects of a visual 
impairment on development, psychosocial adjustment and Braille transcription skills. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 514 Formative Ideas in American Education. Preq.: Six hrs. ED or PSY or CI. 

3(3-0) F. A consideration of the theory and practice of American education as an extension 
of the philosophical climate of opinion of different intellectual ages and how the present 
status of our educational system is grounded in the thought of the past. Beezer 

ED 515 Education and Social Diversity. Preq.: Six hrs. ED, PSY and/or social science. 
3(3-0) Alt. S. An overview of the role of education within a culturally diverse society. Major 
attention directed to racial, ethnic, socioeconomic and regional subpopulations. Among the 
issues to be discussed: the subcultural influences on public school performances, equality of 
educational opportunity, social stratification and mobility and the impact of schooling on 
intergroup relations. Serow 

ED 516 Analysis of Occupational Information, Trends and the Labor Market. Preq.: 
Six hrs. of ED. 3(3-0) S. Overview of federal, state and local sources of labor market 
information. Analysis of labor market concepts and applications for career exploration and 
decision making. Use of community surveys in vocational program planning. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 517 Current Issues in Higher Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Examines important social, political and economic issues that affect the 
present and future operation of colleges and universities in America. Graduate Staff 



142 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 518 Introduction to Education Law. Preq.: Six hrs. graduate credit. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of constitutional, statutory and case law as it relates to the elementary and secondary 
public school settings, particularly in the areas of students, teachers and liability. Particu- 
lar emphasis placed on North Carolina and federal law. Beezer 

ED 519 Early Childhood Education. Preq.: PSY ^75 or PSY 576. 3(l-i) S. Planning, 
selecting and using human resources, activities, materials and facilities in the education of 
young children. Studentobservation, participation and evaluation of educational experien- 
ces for the developmental level of individual children for an optimum learning environ- 
ment. A synthesis of the student's knowledge of human development, learning theory and 
research findings as related to classroom application. Graduate Staff 

ED 520 Introduction to Counseling. Preq.: Six hrs. in ED or PSY. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. An 
introduction to counseling with a focus on three settings— schools, college and community 
agencies. Designed to explore issues of theory, practice and research with regard to 
children, adolescents, college students and adults. Personal and professional exploration 
encouraged through the use of psychological tests. Graduate Staff 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services. Preqs.: Eighteen hrs. in 
department and CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. A continuous full-time internship of at least 
one-half semester. Framework of school and community. Work with students, teachers, 
administrators, guidance and pupil personnel workers, parents and resource personnel in 
the community. Supervision of intern by guidance personnel in school as well as by course 
instructors. Graduate Staff 

ED 522 Career Exploration. Preq.: 12 hrs. ED or CI. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course is 
designed for teachers in the public schools of North Carolina who teach in "Career Explora- 
tion" programs. The course emphasizes the philosophy of career exploration, theories 
supporting career exploration, the place of exploration programs in the overall school 
curriculum, correlation of occupational information in academic subjects, sources of occu- 
pational information and its use and approaches to teaching in a career exploration 
program. Clary, Dillon 

ED 523 Orientation and Mobility of the Visually Impaired. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F. The 
sensory processes and sensory cues on which independent mobility depends for the visually 
impaired person. Various techniques and modes of travel considered. Emphasis given to 
instruction and background which will enable person not teaching orientation mobility as a 
skill to reinforce the learning taking place in other situations. Graduate Staff 

ED 524 Career Counseling and Development. Preq.: Six hrs. of ED or PSY. 3(3-0) 
S,Sum,. Knowledge and skills needed to: (a) provide professional career counseling to 
individuals and (b) design, implement and evaluate career development programs for 
particular groups. Areas of study include: theories of career development and decision 
making; career guidance programs in educational, agency and industrial setting; career 
information sources and delivery systems; and assessment in career counseling. 

Gerler, Jones 

ED 525 Advanced Trade Analysis and Course Construction. Preq.: 12 hrs. ED or CI. 
3(3-0) F. Principles and practices in analyzing occupations for the purpose of determining 
teaching content. Practice in the principles underlying industrial course organization 
ba.sed on occupational analysis covering instruction skills and technology and including 
course outlines, job sequences, the development of industrial materials and instructional 
schedules. Graduate Staff 

ED 526 Teaching in College. 3(3-0) Sum. This course focuses on the development of 
competencies to perform the fundamental tasks of a college teacher as well as consideration 
of more long-range tasks such as course development and the university responsibilities of a 
professor. In addition to attending lectures and other types of presentations, students make 
video tapes of their teaching, develop tests, design introductory courses in their teaching 
fields and consider current issues related to university and college teaching. Anderson 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 143 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education. Preq.: 12 hrs. ED or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. An 
historical and philosophical investigation into the social and economic aspects of occupa- 
tional education; an overview of the broad field of occupational education for youth and 
adults, with emphasis upon the trends and problems connected with the conduct of occupa- 
tional education under federal and state guidance. An overview study of federal and state 
legislation pertaining to occupational education. Malpiedi 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
3(3-0) F,S. Designed for individuals preparing to be directors, administrators or supervi- 
sors of occupational education programs at the local, state and/or national levels. Emphasis 
on organization and operation of cooperative occupational education programs. Covers the 
entire field of cooperative occupational education on secondary, postsecondary and adult 
levels with references to accepted essentials of cooperative education so details of planning, 
organization, establishment and operation of cooperative occupational programs practical 
and meaningful. Student visitations to existing quality programs in cooperative occupa- 
tional education to study on-site conditions in specialized areas. Dillon 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development. Preqs.: Grad. standing and ED 527 or 
ED 630 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Selection and organization of curricula and instructional 
materials in occupational education. Dillon 

ED 530 Theories and Techniques of Counseling. Preq.: Six hrs. of ED or PSY; Coreq.: 
ED 520 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A combination of the study of theory and philosophy 
in counseling with techniques of counseling. Topics to be examined include behavioral 
approaches, psychoanalytic approaches, client-centered counseling, existential counseling 
and relationship models, and their relation to counseling. For each theory, the techniques 
are related to the theoretical concepts and principles. Locke 

ED 531 Mental Retardation. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. The definitions, classifica- 
tions, diagnostic and treatment procedures for mental retardation examined from medical, 
sociological and educational points of view. Categories of retardation examined include 
mild, moderate, severe and profound. Graduate Staff 

ED 532 Introduction to Educational Inquiry. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A survey of basic concepts and methods of educational inquiry. Emphasis 
on the logic underlying various approaches to problem definition and solution and on the 
tools of the investigator, as well as on sources and interpretation of research information 
related to the student's particular area of study. Taylor 

ED 533 Guidance and Counseling in the Secondary Schools. Preq.: Grad. standing. 
M3-1) F. An examination of (1) theoretical framework for roles and functions of secondary 
school counselors, (2) primary and secondary prevention strategies and (3) evaluation and 
administration procedures, to develop and implement model programs for secondary 
schools. A major focus on career and classroom developmental guidance as opposed to 
remediation and treatment. Graduate Staff 

ED 534 Guidance and Counseling in Elementary and Middle Schools. Preq.: Grad. 
standing. U(3-l) F. An examination of (1) theoretical framework for roles and functions of 
elementary and middle school counselors, (2) primary and secondary prevention strategies 
and (3) evaluation and administration procedures to develop and implement model pro- 
grams for elementary and middle schools. A major focus will be on classroom developmen- 
tal guidance as opposed to remediation and treatment. Gerler 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education. Preq.: Nine hrs. PSY or CI. 
3(3-0) F. Examines practices in various areas of student personnel work. Studies both 
structure and function of student personnel programs in higher education. Saidla 

ED 535 Structure and Function of the Eye and Use of Low Vision. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F. 
Special institute for participants to spend minimum of 45 hours in class and class-related 
activities. Medical and educational consultants discuss structure and function of the eye. 



144 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

eye anomalies affecting children with low vision, methods of teaching children to use 
minimal vision effectively. Graduate Staff 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education.Preg.. ED 

510. :i(3-Q) S. An examination of the background, history, philosophy and contemporary 
nature of the extension and public service function of institutions of higher education in the 
United States. Emphasis placed on the adult education role of public and private universi- 
ties and colleges. Specific focus on: general extension, industrial extension, engineering 
extension, cooperative extension and continuing education. Graduate Staff 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: 
Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. This course examines forms of instruction appro- 
priate for the teaching of adults. Special emphasis placed upon methods which maximally 
involve the adult learner. The study of concepts, theories and principles relevant to the 
selection, utilization and evaluation of instructional strategies focus on the integration of 
theory into practice. Through participation in classroom exercises, the student develops 
proficiency in using teaching techniques applicable in adult and community college 
education. Fingeret 

ED 539 Educational Gerontology. Preg..- Six /irs. iuED, SOCorPSY. 3(3-0) F. Ahrosid 
overview of factors associated with the education of older adults. Various sociological, 
physiological, psychological and economic aspects of aging explored in terms of their 
educational implications. Attention given to knowledge and skills required for the devel- 
opment of educational programs for the aging population. Glass 

ED 540 Career/Vocational Education for the Handicapped. Preqs.: ED 506 and ED 
527 or CI. 3(3-0) S.Relevant definitions and current legislation and policies reviewed. 
Appropriate curriculum, methods and materials studied. Topic areas include program 
development, vocational evaluation, job placement and support services for the handi- 
capped. Clary 

ED 541 A Practicum in Occupational Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
1-6 F,S. Under a faculty-supervised practicum in an educational, industrial or governmen- 
tal setting, the student participates in and analyzes activities associated with the planning, 
implementation and evaluation of instructional programs or services in vocational educa- 
tion. A unique plan developed by the student and approved by the supervisor. Clary 

ED 541B Practicum in Education Administration. Preqs.: ED 550 and CI. 1-6 F,S. 
Supervised experience in an appropriate educational setting to enable the student to gain 
practice in applying concepts, principles and theories of education administration. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 542 Contemporary Approaches in the Teaching of Social Studies. Preqs.: 
Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. An analysis of the principles, strategies 
and application of new teaching approaches. Includes structured projects and practical 
experiences. Harper, Martorella 

ED 543 Adulthood and Learning: The Later Years. Preq.: ED 539 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt 
yrs. A study of basic sensory, attitudinal, intellectual and emotional changes that occur in 
individuals during the process of growing old and the implications of these changes for 
developing, implementing and evaluating educational programs for and with older adults. 

Glass 

ED 544 The Teaching of Composition. Preq.: 9 firs, of ED, PSY and/or ENG. 3(3-0) S. 
For classroom teachers. Offers practical field-tested ideas to help students improve as 
writers by focusing on composition as a process as well as a product. Activities for teaching 
prewriting, composing, revising, proofreading, grammar and evaluating practiced, with 
suggestions for individual group learning. Research related to effective composition teach- 
ing reviewed. Pritchard 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 145 

ED 545 Reading in the Elementary School. Preqs.: Six hrs. ED or PSY. S(S-O) F. Alt. 
yrs. Theoretical foundations of reading instruction and current methods and materials for 
teaching reading, with an emphasis on planning and implementing reading programs for 
children in kindergarten through grade six. Fox 

ED 546 Reading in the Content Areas. Preqs.: Six hrs. in ED or PSY. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 
Methods in instruction for applying reading to content areas, with emphasis on means of 
improving comprehension, vocabulary and study skills in subject matter classrooms. 

Spires 

ED 547 Language Arts in the Elementary School. Preq.: Six hrs. in ED. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Advanced professional training in the teaching of language arts for middle grades and 
elementary teachers, including an in-depth introduction to research-based teaching 
strategies, new instructional resources and the literature on the field. Fox 

ED 548 Development of Microcomputer Software for Instruction. Preq.: Six hrs. ED 
or PSY or CI. 3(3-1) F. Course topics covered are the instructional design principles 
underlying the development of microcomputer-based instructional software and accom- 
panying materials and programming principles and their implementation in courseware 
development. Additional topics include authoring languages, programming languages and 
graphics. Vasu 

ED 549 Finance in Adult and Community College Education. Preqs.: ED 500; grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) S. Examination of theory, research, practices and issues in the development 
and management of financial resources of the adult and community college enterprise. 

Fountain, Tollefson 

ED 550 Principles of Educational Administration. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 3(3-0) 
F,S. This course designed as an introductory course in educational administration. 
Emphasizing basic principles of administration, the course draws upon administrative 
theory, business and public administration models as well as theoretical constructs from 
various disciplines. MacPhail-Wilcox 

ED 55 1 Principles and Practices of Supervision. Preqs.: 6 hrs. ED /PSY graduate study 
and CI. 3(3-0) S. Designed to provide the educational leader with an understanding of the 
nature of instructional supervision, skills needed in supervising educational programs and 
an analysis of promising practices for improving programs. Opportunity provided for 
application of principles of supervision to one or more practical problems. Parramore 

ED 553 Community Service Agencies. Preq.: Six hrs. of ED, PSY or SOC or CI. 3(3-0). 
F. An introduction to the issues, functions, and scope of the work being done in various 
human service agency programs; an overview of helping approaches with selected client 
populations; related professional concerns examined. Sprinthall 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS 
status. 3(3-0) F,S. Consideration of the need for planning programs in education; objectives 
and evaluation of community programs; use of advisory group; organization and use of 
facilities. Graduate Staff 

ED 555 Issues and Trends in Education for the Allied Health Professions. Preq.: 
Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. An analysis of educational and social factors influenc- 
ing change in health professions education. Emphasis on problems of student selection and 
program articulation and the implications for health occupations education and health 
services of recent legislation regarding the handicapped. Patterson 

ED 556 Learning Disabilities. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of the field of 
learning disabilities, including definitions, prevalence, etiology, characteristics and cur- 
rent educational trends for educating learning disabled students. Crossland 



146 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 557 Methods and Materials in Learning Disabilities. Preq.: ED 556 or CI. 3(3-0) S. 
A study of the current methods and materials for the teaching of learning disabled students 
in the elementary and/or secondary schools, including curriculum and instructional tech- 
niques. Course focuses on examination of commercial materials and the development of 
teacher-made materials for use with the learning disabled student. Crossland 

ED 558 Resource Teaching in Special Education. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of resource teaching in the area of special education, with emphasis on resource 
teaching with the learning disabled and mentally retarded. Course focuses on types of 
resource programs, how to establish and maintain a program, selection of students, curric- 
ulum and materials. Graduate Staff 

ED 559 The Adult Learner. Preq.: Six hrs. in ED. 3(3-0) S. Principles involved in adult 
education programs including theories and concepts undergirding and requisite to these 
programs. Emphasis given to interrelationship of the nature of adult learning, the nature of 
the subject matter and the setting in which learning occurs. The applicability of relevant 
principles and pertinent research findings to adult learning thoroughly treated. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 560 Teaching through the Arts. Preq.: 6 hrs. in ED and/or PSY. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Examines the role of the arts in the teaching/learning process, emphasizing ways class- 
room teachers can use the arts to foster students' personal growth, creativity and academic 
achievement. Develops teaching skills through explorations in graphic arts, sculpture, 
dance/movement, drama, film, creative writing and poetry. Graduate Staff 

ED 561 Educational Diagnosis and Prescription for Exceptional Children. Preq.: 

ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A study of the concept of educational diagnosis of exceptional 
students, including an examination of educational diagnostic procedures in current use in 
special education. Course focuses on the development of informal diagnostic techniques and 
procedures for adapting curriculum and instruction for the exceptional learner. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 562 Communication Disorders in the Classroom. Preq.: ED 506 or CI 3(3-0) S. Alt 
yrs. A study of communication disorders which occur in the school age population, includ- 
ing types of disorders, prevalence, etiologj', characteristics and corrective therapy. Course 
focuses on communication disorders among exceptional students and the classroom 
teacher's role in working with communication disorders. Crossland 

ED 563 Effective Teaching. Preq.: Twelve hrs. ED including student teaching. 3(3-0) F. 
Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie course approaches; 
identifying problems of importance; problem solution for effective learning; evaluation of 
teaching and learning; making specific plans for effective teaching. Graduate Staff 

ED 564 Classroom Management in Special Education. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of the concepts and procedures involved in the design and implementation of tech- 
niques for managing exceptional students in a classroom setting. Course focuses on 
methods for increasing and maintaining appropriate classroom behaviors in exceptional 
learners. Graduate Staff 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations. Preq.: 12 hrs. ED or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. The theory of 
education and work is related to the expanding field of agricultural occupations. Career 
development in agricultural occupations associated with curriculum development needs. 
Occupational experience in agriculture seen in relation to the curriculum and the place- 
ment in agricultural occupations. Graduate Staff 

ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
■i(3-0) F,S. A major and critical element in all programs of vocational education is the 
provision for appropriate student learning experiences in a real and simulated employment 
environment. Due to recent developments in education and agriculture, new and expanded 
concepts of occupational experience have been devised. Current research substantiates the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 147 

need and desire of teachers of agriculture for assistance in implementing the new concepts. 
The course designed not only to provide this aid but to develop a depth of understanding of 
the theoretical foundations underlying the new developments in occupational experiences 
to stimulate individual growth and creativity in implementing further developments. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 567 Education of Special Adults Populations. 3(3-0) S, Sum. Analyzing and devel- 
oping adult education responses to the needs and characteristics of special adult popula- 
tions such as nonliterate, unemployed, handicapped and older adults. Fingeret 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) 
F.S. Designed to meet the needs of leaders in adult education. Opportunity to study some of 
the basic problems and values in working with adult groups. Attention given to the problem 
of fitting the educational program for adults into the public school program and other 
educational programs as well as to the methods of teaching adults. Flowers 

ED 569 The Principalship. Preq.: ED 550 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A survey course 
covering the major responsibilities and tasks of a school principal, e.g., curriculum and 
instructional leadership, teacher recruitment and selection, fiscal record keeping, pupil 
schedules, plant management. Students combine findings from their readings with present 
practices to develop workable solutions to managerial and instructional problems. 

MacPhail-Wilcox 

ED 570 Foundations of Mathematics Education. Preq.: ED 471 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
Sum. A course on the current status of mathematics education with special emphasis on the 
study and critical analysis of current practices in mathematics instruction from elemen- 
tary school through college. Graduate Staff 

ED 571 Introduction to the Gifted Individual. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of 
theories and concepts of giftedness and procedures in identifying the gifted, with a consid- 
eration of factors influencing giftedness and ways it may be fostered. Aubrecht 

ED 572 Methods for Teaching the Gifted. Preq.: ED 571 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
major approaches used in the education of the gifted, including an opportunity to develop a 
unit plan based upon one of these approaches. Aubrecht 

ED 573 Behavior Disorders. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of definitions, 
etiology, characteristics, philosophies and approaches to educational programming for 
children and youth with behavior disorders, including the emotionally handicapped, autis- 
tic and socially maladjusted. CuUinan 

ED 574 Methods and Materials: Behavior Disorders. Preq.: ED 573 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of curriculum materials, instructional strategies and behavior management tech- 
niques related to teaching behaviorally disordered children and youth, including individu- 
alized instruction, group process, organization and evaluation of classroom programs, 
parent involvement, community resources and teachers' personal and professional growth 
and development. Cullinan 

ED 575 Foundations of Science Education. Preq.: ED 4 75 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 
Alt. yrs. Study and analysis of the philosophical, historical, sociological, political and 
economic factors affecting science education in the schools of the United States. Implica- 
tions for science education of various learning theories examined along with models for 
curriculum development and program planning. Critical analysis of current trends, issues 
and problems in science education in terms of multiple perspectives. Anderson, Wheatley 

ED 576 Teaching/Learning Approaches for Emerging Adolescents. Preqs.: ED 507 
or equivalent; grad standing and CI. 3(3-0) S. Exploration of teaching/learning approaches 
appropriate to emerging adolescents. Topics include learning styles; interdisciplinary 
inquiry: community-based curriculum: simulations and games; learning centers; mini- 
courses: design of physical space: all-school activities. Arnold 



148 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 577 Improving Classroom Instruction in Science. Preq.: ED U75 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) S. Application ofmajor principles ofeducation and psychology to the improvementof 
science teaching in elementary, middle and secondary schools. Emphasis on critical analy- 
sis of research and the development of research-based classroom applications. Topics 
include goals and objectives of science teaching, instructional strategies, development or 
selection of science materials, evaluation of achievement and elements of a desirable 
classroom climate. Graduate Staff 

ED 578 Law and Higher Education. Preq.: Six hrs. grad. credit. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A 
study of constitutional, statutory and case law as it relates to higher education. Emphasis on 
faculty, student and staff rights and tort liability. Beezer 

ED 579 Concepts and Principles of Evaluation Applied to Non-formal Adult Educa- 
tion Programs. Preq.: ED 503 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to the evaluation of non-formal 
adult educational programs; course topics include the purposes of evaluation, alternative 
concepts and techniques, stake holders and their concerns, the specification of evidence, 
selection of standards for making judgments, gathering and analysis of data, use and 
dissemination of results and handling problems in evaluation. Graduate Staff 

ED 580 Evaluation Theory and Practice in Education. Preq.: ED 532 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F. A review of educational program evaluation with emphasis on (1) theory and 
conceptual models of evaluation, (2) evaluation design, and (3) environmental practical 
factors influencing the design and implementation of evaluation studies. Graduate Staff 

ED 581 Curriculum and Instruction in the Allied Health Professions. Preqs.: 
Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing and CI. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. A study of the elements of 
curriculum design and theoretical considerations for the development of curricula in the 
health occupations. Identification, analysis and evaluation of instructional strategies 
appropriate for clinical and classroom teaching. Patterson 

ED 582 Teaching Braille and Communication Skills. Preqs.: ED 513 and ED 5J^5 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Information-access methods for visually impaired learners. Methods 
and materials for teaching Braille reading and selecting and teaching the use of electronic 
aids. Graduate Staff 

ED 583 Design and Evaluation of Instructional Materials. Preq.: (yrad. standing. 
3(3-0) S. Emphasis upon the characteristics and selection of various media for instruction 
and their use in educational settings. Instructional materials designed and produced. 
Analysis of the research in the field conducted. Projects and assignments individualized. 
Application of grounded research and theory concerning learning to the design of instruc- 
tional materials. Structured projects and practical experiences used to transfer design 
principles and evaluate instructional products. Martorella 

ED 584 Health Care Delivery Systems and Environments. Preqs.: (Jrad. standing and 
CI. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. Organization of the health care delivery system, services and resources. 
Focus on the major social, economic, political and professional factors which contribute to 
shaping the system and influence change. Organizations and environments analyzed in 
regard to the demand for health manpower and the implications for health occupations 
education. Patterson 

ED 585 Qualitative Research in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: 
Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Designing qualitative studies, conducting field work including 
open-ended interviews and participant observation, analyzing data and understanding 
theoretical and philosophical background of this research approach. Fingeret 

ED 586 Methods and Materials in Visual Impairments. Preqs.: ED 506, ED 513. 3(3-0) 
S. A study of current methods and materials for teaching visually impaired learners. 
Includes curriculum and materials development, adaptation, instructional techniques, 
educational assessment and diagnosis. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 149 

ED 587 Organization and Operation of Training and Development Programs. 3(3- 
0) F. Overview of occupational education as is practiced in business and industrial settings. 
Roles common to training and development specialists are presented, including manage- 
rial concerns related to organizing, operating and financial training and development 
programs. Dillon 

ED 588 Advanced Teaching Methods in Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: ED 362 or 
equivalent. 3(2-2) F,Sum. An intensive examination of the teaching-learning process appli- 
cable to laboratory-classroom instruction. Instructional technology, evaluation, classroom 
control and management given attention. Wenig, Graduate Staff 

ED 589 Personnel Appraisal in Education. Preqs.: PSY 532 andPSY535. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Examination of issues, models, theories and research pertaining to personnel appraisal 
in education. Graduate Staff 

ED 590 Special Problems in Guidance. Preqs.: Six hrs. grad. work in department or 
equivalent and CI. Maximum 6 F,S. Intended for individual or group studies of one or more 
of the major problems in guidance and personnel work. Problems selected to meet the 
interests of individuals. The workshop procedure used whereby special projects, reports 
and research developed by individuals and by groups. Graduate Staff 

ED 591 Teaching Literature for Young Adults. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing or PBS 
status. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Designed to acquaint in-service and pre-service teachers with the 
breadth and diversity of contemporary literature for adolescents, with an emphasis on 
teaching young adult literature. Addresses the history and themes of young adult litera- 
ture, readability of materials, reading preferences, literary merit, skills that can be taught 
through literature, censorship, motivating students to read and organizing literature units. 

Pritchard 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching. Preq.: ED ^71 or equivalent. 1-3 
F,S,Sum. An in-depth investigation of topical problems in mathematics teaching chosen 
from the areas of curriculum, methodology, technology, supervision and research. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 593 Special Problems in Occupational Education. Preq.: Sr. standing, PBS status 
or grad. standing in OED. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Guided independent or group study of current 
problems or topics in occupational education. Graduate Staff 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching. Preq.: ED i76 or equivalent. 1-6 Sum. 
An in-depth investigation of topics in science education not covered in existing courses. 
Includes critical analysis of research and may include field work. May be offered on 
individual basis or as a class. Anderson, Wheatley 

ED 595 Methods and Techniques of Training and Development. 3(3-0) S. Methods 
and techniques common to model occupational education programs in business and indus- 
trial settings discussed. Course focuses on how to design and evaluate effective learning 
programs and instructional methodologies. Dillon 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: Grad. 

standing or PBS status. Credits arranged. F,S,Sum. Study and scientific analysis of prob- 
lems in adult education and preparation of a scholarly research type of paper. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 597 Special Problems in Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 1-3 
F,S,Sum. Designed to provide graduate students in education opportunity to study problem 
areas in professional education under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. 

Graduate Staff 



150 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 598 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction. Preqs.: Six hrs. of ED or 
PSY ajid CI. 1-6 F.S.Sitm. Designed to provide an in-depth study of topical problems in 
curriculum and instruction selected from the areas of current concern to practitioners in 
education. Graduate Staff 

ED 599 Research Projects in Education. Preqs.: CI; ED 532 or equivalent. 1-3 F,S,Sum. 
A project or problem in research in education for graduate students, supervised by 
members of the graduate faculty. The research chosen on the basis of individual students' 
interests and not to be part of thesis or dissertation research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. Preqs.: ED 503, PS 502, SOC 5J,1. 3(3-0) F. This course designed for 
present and potential administrators interested in increasing their understanding of 
organization as a basis for administering effective adult and community college education 
programs. Shearon 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. Preq.: ED 600 or a comparable course(s) on organizational theory. 
3(3-0) S. Designed for persons interested in building a more consistent philosophy of 
educational administration, extending and strengthening their understanding of adminis- 
trative concepts and processes, improving their comprehension of the theoretical and 
research foundations upon which administrative processes are predicated, and increasing 
their ability to apply administrative concepts, theories and principles to the management of 
the complex education system. Graduate Staff 

ED 602 Curriculum Theory and Development. Preqs.: 9 semester hrs. graduate PSY, 
ED 502, ED 5H or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of theory and research in the behavioral sciences 
and education designed to provide the theoretical background for the development of 
elementary and secondary curricula. The knowledge base and skills for critical review of 
curricula and instructional materials explored and an opportunity to apply these provided. 

Arnold, Parramore 

ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Science in Higher Education. Preqs.: ED 570, 
592 or 59U, grad. standing, CI. 3(3-0) S. Collegiate mathematics and science instruction 
examined with respect to goals and objectives, design of courses and curricula, innovative 
programs and facilities, and methods and materials for instruction. Graduate Staff 

ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Science and Mathematics. 

Preqs.: 500-level statistics, ED 615 or PSY 535, CI. 3(3-0) S. A critical study of the elements 
of curriculum design and theory in mathematics education and science education and the 
examination of evaluation procedures for assessing educational innovations. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers of Mathematics and Science. Preqs.: 
ED 470 or 475 or equivalent, ED 570 or 592 or 594. 3(3-0) S. Critical analysis of theories, 
programs and techniques designed to promote interpersonal interactions that will lead to 
more effective teaching of science and mathematics. Graduate Staff 

ED 606 Remediation of Reading Disabilities. Preq.: ED 547 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Advanced approaches to reading remediation examined including theory and research 
related to remedial instructional strategies, analyses of instructional designs and evalua- 
tions of the effectiveness of intervention programs. Fox 

ED 607 The Politics of Higher Education. Preqs.: Grad. standing or Management 
Development Certificate Program and six semester hours of 500-level course work. 3(3-0). An 
examination of the differing and changing perceptions of the role of higher education in 
American society; the politics of competition for priority of attention and resources; organi- 
zational alternatives in its control; relevant elements in the structure and processes of 
government. References to other societies. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 151 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Industrial and Technical Education Programs. 

Preqs.: ED 516 and grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. In this course a study made of the influences 
which impinge upon the development of programs of occupational education. Adequate 
opportunity also provided to examine in detail steps that may be taken to analyze needs for 
occupational education, to organize for its provision, to study its offerings and to evaluate its 
results. Graduate Staff 

ED 611 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting Occupational Education. Preq.: 
ED 527 or ED 630. 3(3-0) S. A detailed study of legislation (national and state) which applies 
directly to occupational education. Basic social issues and economic conditions which 
precipitated the legislation studied in depth. A review also made of the organizational 
structure and policies under which national legislation converted into programs of occupa- 
tional education. Farmer 

ED 612 Finance, Accounting and Management of Occupational Education Pro- 
grams. Preq.: ED 610. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A study of the steps which must be taken in 
financing a new occupational enterprise, following the determination of curriculum by 
area study. All financial transactions such as costs of operation, equipment purchase 
procedures and costs for construction investigated in detail. Belcher 

ED 614 Contemporary Educational Thought. Preqs.: Twelve hrs. ED; CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. This course based on a reading and discussion of twentieth-century works in educa- 
tional philosophy. Such movements as pragmatism, reconstruction, perennialism and exis- 
tentialism considered. Graduate Staff 

ED 616 History of Higher Education in the United States. Preqs.: Six hrs. of grad. ED 
courses and CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A study of the history of higher education from the colonial 
period to the present. Emphasis on how philosophic, political, social and economic forces 
influence the function and structure of higher education. Harvey 

ED 618 School Law for the Administrator. Preq.: ED 518 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. A comprehensive study of constitutional, statutory and case law as it relates to elemen- 
tary and secondary school administration. Emphasis on legal issues associated with gover- 
nance, finance, property, personnel and curriculum. Beezer 

ED 620 Cases in Educational Administration. Preqs.: Grad. standing and CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. This course utilizes the case study and case simulation approach to the study of 
school administration. Administrative concepts developed and applied to simulated situa- 
tions and to actual case histories. The administrative process viewed as a decision-making 
process. The student expected to make decisions after considering alternative courses of 
action and after projecting probable consequences. Dolce 

ED 621 Internship in Education. Preqs.: Nine hrs. in grad. level courses and CI. 3-9 
F,S,Sum. Utilizing the participant-observer role, this course requires participation in 
selected educational situations with emphasis upon development of observational skills, 
ability to record relevant observations by means of written journals, skills in analyzing 
experiences identifying critical incidents and projection of events and consequences. The 
student required to develop possible alternative courses of action in various situations, 
select one of the alternatives and evaluate the consequences of the course of action selected. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 625 Cross Cultural Counseling. Preqs.: ED 530; 9 semester hrs. grad.-level ED. 3(3-0) 
S. Theory and practice of counseling culturally different clients. Client populations include 
African-Americans, Asian-Americans, American Indians and Hispanics. Topics include 
cultural assumptions, cultural values, counselor credibility, prejudice and racism in the 
context of counseling. Locke 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: Twelve hrs. in ED. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. Origins, development of industrial arts education. Philosophical foundations, 
derivation of objectives and criteria for evaluation. Contributions of the heritage to con- 
temporary concepts of industrial arts education. Wenig 



152 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 631 Vocational Development Theory. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. A study of the major theories and constructs of vocational development with 
implications for counseling and career planning. Jones 

ED 632 Applied Research Methods in Education. Preqs.: ST 507 and ED 532 or 

equivalent: Coreq.: ST 508 or CI. 3(l-Jt)S. Through the use of simulated educational settings 
consideration given to the development of research proposals or plans, selection and/or 
development of appropriate measurement instruments and the purposes and functions of 
various statistical designs and procedures. Simulated data prepared and analyzed using 
computer-based statistical packages, the results interpreted and a research report pro- 
duced. Graduate Staff 

ED 634 Diagnosis of Reading Disabilities. Preq.: ED 5U5 or ED 51f6, 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Formal and informal instruments for diagnosing reading disabilities including the com- 
pletion of a diagnostic case study describing the reading performance of a disabled reader. 

Fox 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts. Preq.: Twelve hrs. in ED. 
2(2-0) F,S. Study of the problems and techniques of administration and supervision of 
industrial arts in schools and universities. Selection of teachers, teacher improvement 
methods, public relations, facilities planning and specification. Graduate Staff 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work. Preq.: CI. Max. 3 F,S. Provides 
opportunity for observation and practice of guidance and personnel services in schools, 
institutions of higher education, agencies, business and industry. Graduate Staff 

ED 637 Seminar in Cognitive-Developmental Theory and Practice. Preqs.: 
Advanced grad. standing and CI. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Analysis of major contemporary 
theories of cognitive development (Erikson, Kohlberg, Loevinger, Hunt, Perry) as a basis 
for deliberate counseling and curricular interventions. Sprinthall 

ED 638 Seminar in Cognitive-Development Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing: ED 
637: CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A review of current systems of cognitive-developmental assess- 
ment; methods for measuring psychological growth included. Specific research design 
models reviewed as a basis for action-research. Sprinthall 

ED 639 Group Counseling. Preqs.: ED 530 and one of the folloiving: ED 520, 53^, 535 or 
553. 3(3-0) F,Sum. Theory and practice of group counseling. Theoretical positions include 
client-centered, behavioral and rational-emotive. Aspects of group process include group 
leadership, group membership, establishing a group and maintaining a group. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 640 Laboratory Experiences in Counseling. Preqs.: ED 520 or equivalent: PSY 
535: Coreq.: ED 530. 3(3-0) F. The identification and practice of fundamental skills needed 
for a person to function as an effective counselor. Emphasized is development of specific 
skills in: counseling, testing, human relations, identification of client problems and the 
design of counseling strategies. Graduate Staff 

ED 641 A Practicum in Counseling. Preqs.: Advanced grad. standing, CI. 2-6 S. A 
practicum course in which the student participates in actual counseling experience under 
supervision in a school, college or agency setting. Graduate Staff 

ED 64 IB Diagnostic-Prescriptive Practicum in Reading. Preqs.: ED 5Jf5 or ED 5i6 
and ED 5Jf7 and CI. 3(3-0). S. Supervised teaching experience where students use diagnos- 
tic test data to prescribe remedial programs for reading-disabled individuals, implement 
instructional prescriptions and evaluate the success of remedial plans. Graduate Staff 

ED 64 IC Practicum in Special Education. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. Practicum designed to 
meet the individual needs of the students enrolled in the course. The practicum may involve 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 153 

diagnosis of exceptional students, writing educational prescriptive plans for exceptional 
students, or it may focus on an individual topic that involves working directly with excep- 
tional learners. Graduate Staff 

ED 64 ID Practicum in Science and Mathematics Education. Preq.: ED 570 or ED 
575. 1-6 F,S. Supervised practicum in appropriate settings both on- and off-campus. 
Provides an opportunity for development, implementation and evaluation in science and 
mathematics in a clinical environment under faculty supervision. Graduate Staff 

ED 641G Practicum in Middle Years Education. Preqs.: ED 507 or equivalent; grad. 
standing and CI. S-6 F.S. Designed to provide practical experience in schools and area 
agencies concerned with middle and junior high school education. Arnold 

ED 64 IJ Practicum in Health Occupations. Preqs.: 21 hrs. grad. work including ED 
581 and CI. S(S-O) Alt. yrs. Based upon the participants' professional objectives, a practi- 
cum in a teaching or an administrative context designed appropriate to the individual's 
particular discipline and area of function. Program designed by the student in cooperation 
with the preceptor and course instructor. Patterson 

ED 641K Practicum in Supervision. Preq.: ED 551 or equivalent. 3-6 F,S. Practical 
experience in schools, school systems and area educational agencies concerned with 
instructional supervision. Parramore 

ED 641M Practicum in Instructional Technology— Computers. Preq.: 12 hrs. in 
instructional technology— coynputers. S-6 F,S. Designed to provide practical experience in 
schools and area agencies concerned with integrating the computer into the curriculum. 

Martorella, Vasu 

ED 642 Research Applications in Curriculum and Instruction. Preq.: ST 507 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Focus on selected methodological issues and research findings in the 
areas of curriculum development and supervision, instructional technology, English edu- 
cation, language arts, middle grades education, reading education, social studies and 
special education. Vasu 

ED 643 The American College Student. Preq.: ED 535 or doctoral standing. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. An advanced-level course designed for investigation of the five main families of 
theories of college student development as presented by Chickering, Perry, R. Heath, 
Myers-Briggs, Holland and D. Heath. Assessment and research in student development 
considered, and students design and implement a developmental intervention based on 
Knefelkamp and Wells' Practice-to-Theory-to-Practice model. Graduate Staff 

ED 648 Theory and Process in Reading and Language Arts. Preqs.: ED 5^5 and CI. 

3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Advanced study of theoretical models of reading, research issues in 
reading and in other language processes. Theoretical models of reading studied in depth. 
Emphasis placed on critical examination and analysis of research investigating reading 
acquisition, mature reading behavior and related language processes. Fox 

ED 660 Industrial Arts Curriculum. Preq.: lA 6i5. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Industrial arts 
curriculum origins, analysis, organization, evaluation, revision. Subject matter deviation 
and classification applicable to all levels of instruction. Relationships among curriculum, 
philosophy and methdology. (Also see ED 608, ED 610, ED 630, ED 635 and ED 692.) 

Graduate Staff 

ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education. Preq.: ED 55i. 3(3-0) F,S. Organiza- 
tion, administration, evaluation and possible improvement of supervisory practice; theory, 
principles and techniques of effective supervision in agricultural education at different 
levels. Graduate Staff 

ED 665 Supervising Student Teaching. Preq.: Twelve hrs. of ED. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of 
the program of student teaching in teacher education. Special consideration given the role 



154 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

of the supervising teacher, including the following areas: planning for effective student 
teaching, observation and orientation, school community study, analysisof situation, evalu- 
ating student teachers and coordination with NCSU. Graduate Staff 

ED 666 Supervision of Counseling. Preq.: CI. 3(1-8) F,S. A supervised practicum for 
doctoral students in assisting with the supervision of first-year students in laboratory and 
practicum experiences in individual or group counseling. Graduate Staff 

ED 686 Professional Issues in Counseling. Preq.: Doctoral standing. 1-3 F,S. Alt. yrs. 
Consideration of contemporary issues, trends and recent research in the field of counseling. 

Locke 

ED 687 Seminar in Curriculum and Instruction. Preq.: Doctoral standing. 1-3 S. 
Consideration of contemporary issues, trends and recent research and development find- 
ings in curriculum and instruction. Graduate Staff 

ED 688 Research Application in Occupational Education. Preq.: ED 532. 3(3-0) F,S. 
This course concerned with methodology, application, analysis and synthesis of research in 
occupational education. A review of current occupational education studies, clustered by 
areas, made with attention to statistical techniques, data collecting, data handling, and the 
audience and impact of particular projects and research organizations. The class activities 
in research application designed to bridge the gap between the theories of research metho- 
dology and the student's independent research projects. Coster, Graduate Staff 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education. Preq.: Departmental major or CI. 2(2-0) 
F,S. An in-depth examination and analysis of the literature and research in a particular 
topic(s) in mathematics education. Graduate Staff 

ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: (yrad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. 
Reviews and reports on special topics of interest to students in industrial arts education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 693 Advanced Special Problems in Occupational Education. Preq.: Master's 
degree in vocational field or CI. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Guided independent or group study of 
advanced problems, issues or developments in planning, organizing, teaching, administer- 
ing and/or evaluating occupational education programs. Graduate Staff 

ED 695 Seminar in Science Education. Preq.: Department major or CI. 2(2-0) F,S. An 
in-depth examination and analysis of the literature and research in a particular topic(s) in 
science education. Graduate Staff 

ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: Grad. standing. 
1-3 F,S. Identification and scientific analysis of major issues and problems relevant to adult 
education. Credit for this course involves the active participation of the student in a formal 
seminar and scientific appraisal and solution of a selected problem. The course designed to 
help the student acquire a broad perspective of issues confronting adult educators and to 
acquire experiences in the scientific analysis and solution of specific issues. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 697 Problems of Research Design in Education. Preqs.: ED 632 and CI. 1-3 S. Alt. 
yrs. Provides the student with an individualized but structured investigation of alternative 
problem definitions, research methodologies and statistical analyses for a problem of 
his/her choosing, usually associated with thesis or dissertation. In small groups or individ- 
ually with the instructor, the student considers research design, measurements and statis- 
tical analysis necessary to conduct research. Graduate Staff 

ED 698 Seminar in Occupational Educaiiion. Preq.: ED 527 or ED 630. 3(3-0) F,S. This 
course designed as a seminar-type course, with topics selected each semester. Attention 
given to the broad concepts of occupational education as manifested in the Vocational 
Education Act of 1963 and its amendments, and to the problems and issues underlying the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 155 

development of and implemention of programs of occupational education at elementary, 
junior high, senior high and postsecondary levels. Coster, Graduate Staff 

ED 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research. Preqs.: 15 hrs. of ED; CI. Credits Arranged. 
F.S.Sum. Individual research on a thesis or dissertation problem. Graduate Staff 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. K. Cavin III, Head 

Associate Professor W. T. Easter, Associate Head 

Professor W. E. Alexander, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: D. P. Agrawal, B. J. Baliga, S. M. Bedair, W. Chou, R. E. Funderlic, 
T. H. Glisson Jr., J. J. Grainger, J. R. Hauser, J. F. Kauffman, S. K. Khorram, 
M. A. Littlejohn, N. A. Masnari, N. F. J. Matthews, L. K. Monteith, H. T. Nagel 
Jr., A. A. Nilsson, J. B. O'Neal Jr., C. M. Osborn, A. Reisman, D. R. Rhodes, R. 
J. Trew. H. J. Trussell, A. Vanderlugt, J. J. Wortman; Adjunct Professors: E. 
Christian, W. A. Flood; Visiting Professors: H. W. Etzel, J. R. Suttle; Professors 
Emeriti: W. J. Barclay, A. R. Eckels, A. J. Goetze, G. B. Hoadley; Associate 
Professors: S. T. Alexander, G. F. Bland, R. M. Kolbas, R.-C. Luo, T. K. Miller 
III, U. K. Mishra, S. A. Rajala, W. E. Snyder, M. W. White; Adjunct Associate 
Professors:F. Brglez, J. R. Burke, S. H. Lee, J. R.Jones, S. E. Kerns; Associate 
Professors Emeriti: N. R. Bell, E. G. Manning, W. C. Peterson; Assistant 
Professors: S. H. Ardalan, R. S. Colby, E. F. Gehringer, R. S. Gyurcsik, A. W. 
Kelley, W.-t. Liu, D. L. Lubkeman, J.J. Paulos, D. S. Reeves, G. A. Ruggles, M. 

B. Steer, J. K. Townsend; Visiting Assistant Professors: M.-Y. Chow, M. E. 
Elbuluk. K. W. Kim, M. C. Ozturk, D. E. Van den Bout, I. Viniotis; Lecturer: J. 

C. Sutton III; Visiting Lecturer: G. F. Abbott 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL ADJUNCT GRADUATE FACULTY 

S.-s. Chen, K. Daneshvar, J. H. Kim, R. Makki, H. L. Martin Sr., E. H. Nicollian 

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers programs 
leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). A 
thesis is optional in the M.S. program. In both electrical engineering and compu- 
ter engineering, the department offers a non-thesis option in telecommunica- 
tions. A student pursuing the option must satisfy all requirements for a non- 
thesis M.S. degree but with additional restrictions on courses selected in 
fulfillment of the requirements. 

Admission to the graduate program requires a previous degree in electrical 
engineering, computer engineering or a related engineering or scientific disci- 
pline. Students holding degrees in other than electrical or computer engineering 
may be required to do additional work. All students admitted to the M.S. pro- 
gram are admitted initially to the non-thesis program. Permission to pursue the 
M.S. with thesis is granted when the student identifies a suitable subject for 
research and a member of the ECE graduate faculty agrees to direct the 



156 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

research. Applicants who are not citizens of the United States must submit scores 
on the general portion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Applicants 
seeking fellowships are strongly encouraged to submit scores on the general 
portion of the GRE. 

Areas of concentration in electrical engineering include circuits, electromag- 
netics and microwave systems, signal processing, image processing, robotics 
and computer vision, solid-state materials and devices, optical signal processing, 
communications, power electronics, and power systems. Areas of concentration 
in computer engineering include computer communications, computer perfor- 
mance modeling, computer architecture, VLSI design, digital systems, and 
software engineering. Much of the research in these areas is pursued under the 
auspices of the Center for Communication and Signal Processing, the Computer 
Systems Laboratory, the Electric Power Research Center, the Solid-State 
Laboratories and the Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing. In 
addition, many graduate students in the department benefit from association 
with the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina and with other industrial 
companies in the nearby Research Triangle Park. 

Although the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the 
Department of Computer Science administer separate graduate programs, they 
do so under a single, jointly held graduate computer engineering degree authori- 
zation. As a result, the departments cooperate closely in graduate education and 
research by sharing responsibility for a number of graduate courses, jointly 
operating the Computer Systems Laboratory, collaborating in research and 
administering a number of joint faculty appointments. The close cooperation of 
the departments offers graduate students in both disciplines an unusually wide 
range of educational and research opportunities. 

The department, the College of Engineering, the Graduate School and several 
industrial companies offer various kinds of financial assistance to qualified 
students, including fellowships and teaching and research assistantships. In 
addition, most students who are citizens or permanent residents of the United 
States receive tuition scholarships equal to the difference between resident and 
nonresident tuition. 

Additional information will be provided to interested and qualified applicants. 
Requests for information should be directed to: Graduate Coordinator, Depart- 
ment of Electrical and Computer Engineering, NCSU, Box 7911, Raleigh, NC 
27695-7911. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

EC E 401 Introduction to Signal Processing. Preqs.: ECE 301, ECE 302. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ECE 409 Introduction to Telecommunications Engineering. Preq.: ECE 301. 3(3-0) 
F. 

ECE 431 Electronics Engineering. Preq.: ECE 3U. 3(2-3) F,S. 

ECE 432 Communications Engineering. Preqs.: ECE 301, ECE 3U. 3(2-3) S. 

ECE 435 Elements of Control. Preqs.: ECE 305, ECE 3U. 3(2-3) F. 

ECE 436 Digital Control Systems. Preq.: ECE A35. 3(3-0) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 157 

ECE 439 Integrated Circuit Technology and Fabrication. Preq.: ECE Ul. 3(2-2) S. 

ECE (CSC) 440 Digital Systems Interfacing. Preq.: CSC 312 or ECE 3U0. 3(2-2) S. 

ECE 441 Introduction to Solid-State Devices. Preqs.: ECE 303, ECE 3U. 3(3-0) F. 

ECE 444 Computer Control of Robots. Preqs.: ECE 3U; and ECE 3U0 or ECE 212. 
3(2-3) F,S. 

ECE 446 VLSI Systems Design. Preqs.: ECE 3U and ECE 3W or ECE 212. M3-2) F,S. 

ECE 448 Microwave Antennas, Radars and Communication Systems. Preq.: ECE 
303. 3(3-0) F. 

ECE 451 Power System Analysis. Preq.: ECE 305. 3(3-0) F. 

ECE 452 Power Systems Protection. Preq.: ECE If51. 3(3-0) S. 

ECE 454 Electrical Machinery. Preq.: ECE 305. 3(3-0) S. 

ECE 455 Computer Control of SCR Motor Drives. Preq.: ECE 305 or ECE 331. 3(1-U) 
FS. 

ECE 457 Semiconductor Power Conversion. Preq.: ECE 3U. 3(3-0) F. 

ECE 492 Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. Preq.: CI. 1-U F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ECE (CSC) 501 Operating Systems Principles. 3(3-0) F. (See computer science.) 

ECE (CSC) 506 Digital Systems Architecture. 3(3-0) F. (See computer science.) 

ECE (CSC) 510 Software Engineering. 3(3-0) F. (See computer science.) 

ECE 511 Analog Electronics. Preqs. : ECE 1^31, grad. standing or B average in ECE and 
MA. 3(2-3) S. A study of analog integrated circuits and analog integrated circuit design 
techniques. Review of basic device and technology issues. Comprehensive coverage of MOS 
and Bipolar operational amplifiers. Brief coverage of analog-to-digital conversion tech- 
niques and switched-capacitor filters. Strong emphasis on the use of computer modeling 
and simulation as a design tool. Students required to complete an independent design 
project. Paulos 

ECE (CSC) 512 CompUer Construction. 3(3-0) S. (See computer science.) 

ECE (CSC) 513 Digital Signal Processing. Preqs.: ECEWl, BaverageinECEandMA 
or CI. 3(3-0) F. Digital processing of analog signals. Offline and real-time processing for 
parameter, waveshape and spectrum estimation. Digital filtering and applications in 
speech, sonar, radar, data processing, and two-dimensional filtering and image processing. 

W. Alexander, Rajala, Trussell 

ECE (CSC) 514 Random Processes. Preqs.: ECE 301, B average in ECE and MA. 3(3-0) 
F. Probabilistic descriptions of signals and noise, including joint, marginal and conditional 
densities, autocorrelation, cross-correlation and power spectral density. Linear and nonli- 
near transformations. Linear least-squares estimation. Signal detection. 

T. Alexander, O'Neal 

ECE 515 Telecommunications Transmission Systems. Pre^.. Grad. stondmgr. 3(3-0) S. 
Analysis of the components of a large telecommunications system with direct dialing. A 
detailed study of high-capacity digital (baseband, carrier and optical) and analog (carrier) 



158 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

systems. Includes multiplexers, protection switching, diversity, microwave antennas and 
propagation, and noise in digital and analog systems. Hutchison, O'Neal 

ECE516 System Control Engineering. Pre(7...EC^455 or ^C^ 50^.5^5-0; F. Introduc- 
tion to analysis and design of continuous and discrete-time dynamical control systems. 
Emphasis on linear, single-input, single-output systems using state variable and transfer 
function methods. Topics include open and closed-loop representation; analog and digital 
simulation; time and frequency response; stability by Routh-Hurwitz, Nyquist and Lia- 
punov methods; performance specifications; cascade and state variable compensation. 
Assignments utilize computer-aided analysis and design programs. Chow 

ECE (CSC) 518 Computer Graphics. 3(3-0). (See computer science.) 

ECE (CSC) 520 Fundamentals of Logic Systems. Preqs.: ECE 318, B average in ECE 
and MA. 3(3-0) F. A study of algebraic structures as related to logic systems, models for 
switching circuit behavior and their relation to hardware implementation. Includes theo- 
retical treatment of both combinational and sequential logic systems concepts. 

W. Alexander 

ECE (CSC) 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design. Preq.: ECE 3k2. 3(3-0) 
F,S. A study of the internal structure and organization of digital systems with the computer 
as a primary focus. The emphasis is on problem description and modeling as required in the 
design process. The design of all major components in digital systems, including memory, 
input-output and control utilizing current technology, discussed. Miller 

ECE 525 Optical Signal Processing. Preq.: ECE 301. 3(3-0) F. Review of key principles 
from geometric optics; resolving power and the optical invariant and their relation to 
principles of communication theory; Fresnel and Fourier transformations and a study of 
direct and heterodyne detection, photodetectors, dynamic range, spatial filtering and 
carrier-frequency methods; applications such as spectrum analysis, pattern recognition 
and signal detection. Graduate Staff 

ECE 530 Physical Electronics. Preqs.: ECE 303, B average in ECE and MA. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of the properties of charged particles under the influence of fields and in solid 
materials. Quantum mechanics, particle statistics, semi-conductor properties, fundamen- 
tal particle transport properties, p-n junctions. Ruggles 

ECE 531 Principlesof Transistor Devices. Pre(7..-£'C£'.4.4i.5^5-o;S. An analysisof the 

operating principles of transistor structures. Basic semiconductor physics reviewed and 
used to provide an explanation of transistor characteristics. Device-equivalent circuits 
developed and used to interpret semiconductor-imposed limitations on device performance. 
Devices analyzed include MESFET'S, HEMT'S, Bipolar transistors, PBT'S, heterojunc- 
tion BJT'S and SIT's Trew 

ECE 532 Principles of Microwave Circuits. Preg-..- (yrad. standing or B average in ECE 
and MA. 3(3-0) F. Principles required to understand the behavior of electronic circuits 
operating at microwave frequencies. This course starts with a review of electromagnetic 
theory and establishes an understanding of the techniques required for working with 
electronic circuits at microwave and millimeter-wave frequencies. Circuit components 
that operate at these frequencies discussed. Trew 

ECE (CSC) 533 Digital Electronics. Preqs.: ECE 31U, grad. standing or B average in 
ECEandMA. .?^?-OjS. A study of digital integrated circuits and digital integrated circuit 
design techniques. The following topics covered: semiconductor, devise and technology 
issues; bipolar logic circuits including TTL, ECL and IIL; static and dynamic MOS logic 
circuits; and semiconductor memory circuits. A strong emphasis placed on the use of 
computer modeling and simulation as a design tool. The completion of three design projects 
required. Gyurcsik 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 159 

ECE 537 Microwave Device Characterization Techniques. Preq.: ECE U8. 3(1-5) F. 
A laboratory in principles of microwave characterization and operation of microwave test 
equipment such as spectrum analyzers, power meters, detectors and network analyzers. 
Measurements of impedance noise figure, equivalent circuit parameters and frequency 
response will be performed on various circuit elements and devices. Graduate Staff 

ECE 539 Integrated Circuit Technology and Fabrication. Preq.: ECEUl. 3(2-2) S. A 
study of semiconductor device and integrated circuit processing and technology. Covers 
sample preparation and specification, oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, photolith- 
ography, design rules and measurement techniques. Osburn, Wortman 

ECE 540 Electromagnetic Fields. Preq.: ECEU8. 3(3-0) S. A brief review of Maxwell's 
Equations, constitutive relations and boundary conditions. Power and energy relations for 
plane waves in isotropic and anisotropic media. Analysis of transmission lines, hollow 
metallic wave guides and dielectric waveguides. Green functions and applications to radia- 
tion and scattering. Electromagnetics and special relativity. Kauffman 

ECE (CSC) 542 Database Management. 3(3-0) F. (See computer science.) 

ECE 546 VLSI Systems Design. Preq.: ECE 3U2. 3(3-0) F. Digital systems design in 
CMOS VLSI technology: CMOS devise physics, fabrication, primitive components, design 
and layout methodology, integrated system architectures, timing, testing future trends of 
VLSI technology. Graduate Staff 

ECE 547 VLSI Architecture. Preqs.: ECE iOl, ECE U6. 3(3-0) F. Study of algorithms 
and special purpose architectures for applications that require high performance systems 
such as digital signal and image processing. Topics include computer arithmetic, systolic 
arrays, DSP chips, wavefront processors and VLSI system design. Graduate Staff 

ECE 550 Power System Operation and Control. Preqs.: ECE 305 or ECE 331, B 
average in ECE and MA. 3(3-0) F. Fundamental concepts of economic operation and 
control of power systems. Real and reactive power balance. System components, character- 
istics and operation. Steady state and dynamic analysis of interconnected systems. Tieline 
power and load-frequency control with integrated economic dispatch. Grainger 

ECE (FY) 552 Introduction to the Structure of Solids. 3(3-0) S. (See physics.) 

ECE (CSC) 558 Digital Image Processing. Preqs.: ECE WU ST 371, high-level pro- 
gramming capability. 3(3-0) Every yr. Introduction to the basic techniques of image pro- 
cessing. Topics include image formation and perception, digitization, Fourier transform 
domain processing, restoration and tomographic reconstruction. Rajala, Trussell 

ECE (CSC) 559 Pattern Recognition. Preqs.: ECE (CSE) 5U, ST 371, B average in 
ECE and MA. 3(3-0) S. A study of image pattern recognition techniques and computer- 
based methods for scene analysis, including discriminate functions, fixture extraction, 
classification strategies, clustering and discriminant analysis. Applications and current 
research results will be covered. Snyder 

ECE (CSC, IE, OR) 562 Computer Simulation Techniques. 3(3-0) F. (See computer 
science.) 

ECE (CSC) 571 Data Transmission/Communications. Preqs.: CSE i5Jt or CSC 312 or 
ECE 3A0; CSE A59 or ECE 301. 3(3-0) S. Deals with the principles and techniques of 
moving digital data through transmission facilities. To be covered: digital information 
representation; characteristics of channels; modulation and demodulation (MODEM) 
techniques; error detection and correction; line control procedure; circuit, message and 
packet switching; multiplexors and concentrators. Graduate Staff 



160 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ECE (CSC) 572 Computer Communications. Preq.: CSC 312 or ECE 3W or CSE U5U; 
Coreq.: B average in technical subjects. 3(3-0) F. The purpose of this course is to enable the 
student to understand the principles, the control and operations and the potential of 
computer communication systems; to present techniques for topological design and ana- 
lytic modeling of such systems; and to provide the foundation for more detailed studies and 
research. The courses are self-contained and focus on practical applications of state-of-art 
techniques. Graduate Staff 

ECE (CSC) 573 Introduction to Computer Performance Modelling. 3(3-0) F. (See 
computer science.) 

ECE (CSC, IE) 575 Voice Input/Output Communication Systems. 3(3-0) F. (See 
industrial engineering.) 

ECE (CSC) 574 Real Time Computer Systems. 3(3-0) Alt. S. (See computer science.) 

ECE 591, 592 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Preq.: B average in technical 
subjects. 3(3-0) F,S. A two-semester sequence to develop new courses and to allow qualified 
students to explore areas of special interest. Graduate Staff 

ECE 593 Individual Topics in Electrical Engineering. Preq.: B average in technical 
subjects. 1-3 F,S. A course providing an opportunity for individual students to explore topics 
of special interest under the direction of a member of the faculty. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ECE 601 Analog VLSI. Preq.: ECE 511. 3(3-0) S. A survey of advanced topics in very 
large-scale analog circuits (VLSI). The course provides in-depth coverage of analog-to- 
digital and digital-to-analog conversion, and switched-capacitor and other monolithic fil- 
tering techniques. Brief coverage is provided of special circuits for telecommunications 
and biomedical applications. Graduate Staff 

ECE603 Computer-aided Circuit Analysis. Pregf..- ECE" .5/i. 3(3-0)F. Steady state and 
transient analysis of circuits with emphasis on circuit theory and computer methods. Many 
analysis techniques are considered, including linear nodal, signal flow graph, state equa- 
tion, time-domain and functional simulation and analysis of sampled data systems. Also 
included are sensitivity and tolerance analysis, macromodeling of large circuits, and 
nonlinear circuit theory. Steer 

ECE 613 Advanced Feedback Control. Preq.; ECfi" 5/ 6. 5f5-o; 5. The study of advanced 
topics in dynamical systems and multivariable control. Current research and recent devel- 
opments in the field will be treated. Chow 

ECE 619 Microwave Circuits Design. Pre9..-£'C£' 552. 3(3-0) S.Alt, yrs. Techniques for 
the design of microwave and millimeterwave components and systems developed and 
examined. Radar and radiometer systems introduced and discussed. System-imposed con- 
straints upon component performance investigated. Specific topics include mixer, oscilla- 
tor and amplifier performance and design. Modern computer-aided design techniques 
used. Trew 

ECE 622 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Materials. Preq.: ECE 530. 3(3-0) S. A 
review of energy bands in semiconductors. Detailed treatment of thermal and electrical 
transport phenomena, equilibrium and non-equilibrium semiconductor statistics. Also 
optical properties and hot electron effects in solid-state materials. Kolbas 

ECE 623 Optical Properties of Semiconductors. Preq.: ECE 530. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Materials and device-related properties of compound optical semiconductors studied. 
Included topics are: optical constants, absorption and emission processes in semiconduc- 
tors, photodetectors, LED's semiconductor lasers. Kolbas 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 161 

ECE 624 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Devices. Preq.: ECE 530. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of the basic physical phenomena responsible for the operation of solid-state devices. 
The semiconductor equations examined and utilized to explain basic principles of opera- 
tion. Rectifying and ohmic contacts examined. Various state-of-the-art devices studied in 
detail. Wortman 

ECE 625 Advanced Solid-State Device Theory. Preq.: ECE 62U. 3(3-0) F. A study of 
the latest developments in solid-state devices. Topics selected from subjects of current 
interest and state-of-the-art results discussed. Emphasis on the basic fundamental physical 
principles of operation as opposed to circuit applications. Wortman 

ECE (PY) 627 Semiconductor Thin Films Technology. Preq.: ECE 530. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Techniques and processes encountered in the growth and characterization of epitaxial 
semiconductor films. Examples of growth techniques to be considered are: solution growth, 
chemical vapor deposition, molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering. Film characterization 
includes electrical characterization using Hall techniques, optical characterization using 
x-ray and electron microscopy techniques, surface and thin film analysis such as auger and 
secondary ion mass-spectrometer. Bedair 

ECE 628 Preparation of Electronic Materials. Preq.: ECE 530. 3(3-0) S. Ait. yrs. A 
study of the principles governing the preparation of the electronic materials from the solid, 
liquid and gaseous states. Emphasis given to the experimental methods and to factors 
which affect the electronic behavior of materials, such as non-stoichiometry, charged and 
uncharged defects. Reisman 

ECE 629 Growth of Thin Films from the Vapor Phase. Preq.: ECE 530. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Practical and basic aspects of single and polycrystal growth using chemical vapor 
transport processes. Emphasis on materials of interest in microelectronics and on experi- 
mental methods used to implement chemical vapor processes and to understand chemical 
vapor processes. Reisman 

ECE 632 Povi^er System Stability and Control. Preqs.: ECE 451, ECE 516. 3(3-0) S. 
Modeling of synchronous machines and their control systems. Coupled electric circuit 
approach. Park's transformations, additional rotor windings. Rudiments of dynamic and 
transient stability. Excitation systems, governor-control systems, power-system stabiliz- 
ers. State space formulations for computer-based dynamic studies. Lubkeman 

ECE 633 Computer Analysis of Large-Scale Power Systems. Preq.: ECE 550. 3(3-0) 
F. Computer-based matrix methods of analysis of large networks. Problem statements, 
algorithmic formulations and solution techniques emphasizing efficient use of the compu- 
ter for short-circuit calculations, computations of power flows under normal and emer- 
gency conditions and stability studies. Linear programming and optimization methods in 
power system planning. Lubkeman 

ECE (CSC) 640 Parallel Processing. Preq.: CSE 506. 3(3-0) S. Pipeline and vector 
computers, SIMD computers and performance enhancement, multiprocessing control and 
algorithms, example multiprocessors, data flow computer, VLSI-based architecture, 
recent research papers in parallel processing area. Agrawal 

ECE (CSC) 641 Sequential Machines. Preq.: ECE (CSE) .520. 3(3-0) F. The study of 
finite automata, both synchronous and asynchronous. Machine equivalence and minimiza- 
tion, state identification and the state assignment problem. Flip-flop activation from the 
state diagram and other realization techniques. Graduate Staff 

ECE 642 Automata and Adaptive Systems. Preq.: ECE (CSE) 520. 3(3-0) S. The study 
of neural nets in natural systems, artificial nerve nets, artificial intelligence, goal-directed 
behavior, the logic of automata and adaptive Boolean logic. Computability, Turing 
machines and recursive function theory. Graduate Staff 



162 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ECE 643 Advanced Computer Architecture. Preq.: ECE 6^0. 3(3-0) F. Multiprocessor 
interconnection and performance evaluation, multicomputer interconnections and asso- 
ciated problems, other architectural considerations, VLSI and computer architecture, 
application-directed architecture and case studies. Agrawal 

ECE 647 Multidimensional Digital Signal Processing. Preq.: ECE 513. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of multidimensional signal processing techniques and algorithms. Topics include 
multidimensional transforms, multidimensional digital filters, computational structures 
for implementation of multidimensional systems and multidimensional filter design. 

Rajala 

ECE 650 Design Automation for VLSL Preq.: CSE 505. 3(3-0) S. VLSI CAD 
(computer-aids-to-design) tools research: physical design automation— layout, module 
generator, silicon compiler; logical design automation— CAD language, synthesis; simu- 
lation—circuit level, switch level, logic level, functional level; optimization techniques: 
graph theory, simulated annealing. W. Alexander 

ECE (CSC) 651 Statistical Communication Theory. Preq.: ECE (CSE) 51U(yrMA (ST) 
5Jtl. 3(3-0) S. Waveform analysis including Fourier transforms, correlation functions and 
other statistical descriptions of stationary and non-stationary random processes. Weiner 
theory: prediction, e.stimation and smoothing of discrete and continuous signals; introduc- 
tion to Kalman filtering; problems to illustrate the applications of the theory to speech, 
television and data communication systems. Graduate Staff 

ECE (CSC) 652 Information Theory. Preq.: ECE (CSE) 5U. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Defini- 
tion of a measure of information and a study of its properties, information sources and their 
efficient representation, communication channels and their capacity, encoding and decod- 
ing of data for transmission over noisy channels, source encoding systems, error correcting 
codes, rate distortion bounds. Ardalan 

ECE (CSC) 659 Computer Vision. Preqs.: MA 501 and MA 502. 3(3-0) F. Analysis of 
images by computers. Specific attention is given to analysis of the geometric features of 
objects in images, such as region size, connectedness and topology. Topics covered include: 
segmentation, template matching, motion analysis, boundary detection, region growing, 
shape representation, 3-D object recognition including graph matching. Luo, Snyder 

ECE (CSC) 671 Advanced Computer Performance Modelling. 3(3-0) S. (See compu- 
ter science.) 

ECE (CSC, IE) 675 Advances in Voice InpuVOutput Communication Systems. 3(2-3) 
S. (See industrial engineering.) 

ECE 691, 692 Special Studies in Electrical Engineering. 3(3-0) F,S. An opportunity 
for small groups of advanced graduate students to study topics in their special fields of 
interest under the direction of members of the graduate faculty. Graduate Staff 

ECE 693 Individual Studies in Electrical Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. 
The study of advanced topics of special interest to individual students under the direction of 
faculty members. Graduate Staff 

ECE 699 Electrical Engineering Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing in ECE, consent of 
advisor. Credits arranged. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 163 

Engineering 

These courses are designed for use by graduate students in any department in 
the School of Engineering. 

E (MA, OR) 531 Dynamic Systems and Multivariable Control 1. 3(3-0) F. (See opera- 
tions research.) 

E (MA, OR) 631 Dynamic Systems and Multivariable Control II. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
(See operations research.) 

English 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. E. Bassett, Head 

Associate Professor J. M. Grimwood, Associate Head 

Professor M. S. Reynolds, Director of the Graduate Program 

Professors: B. H. Baines, P. E. Blank Jr., L. S. Champion, J. D. Durant, J. A. 
Gomez, M. Halperen, A. H. Harrison, M. T. Hester, K. F. C. Holloway, A. S. 
Knowles, L. H. MacKethan, W. E. Meyers, J. J. Smoot, A. F. Stein, W. B. Toole 
HI. J. N. Wall Jr., M. C. Williams, R. V. Young Jr.; Adjunct Professor: D. D. 
Short; Professors Emeriti: H. G. Kincheloe, B. G. Koonce Jr., F. H. Moore, P. 
Williams Jr.; Associate Professors: G. W. Barrax, L. J. Betts Jr., E. D. Clark 
Sr., J. W. Clark Jr., D. H. Covington, J. Ferster, H. A. Hargrave, L. T. Holley, J. 
J. Kessel, M. F. King, D. L. Laryea, C. R. Miller, C. E. Moore, C. A. Prioli, L. S. 
Rudner, L. Smith, H. C. West, D. B. Wyrick; Adjunct Associate Professor: E. D. 
Engel; Associate Professor Emeritus: E. P. Dandridge Jr., N. G. Smith; Assis^- 
ant Professors: M. P. Carter, B. A. Fennell, C. G. Herndl, S. B. Katz, D. C. 
Miller, A. M. Penrose, J. 0. Pettis 

The Department of English offers instruction leading to the Master of Arts in 
English, with coursework in English and American literature, rhetoric and 
composition, linguistics, and creative writing. The master's program can serve 
either as a complete course of study or as the first year of study toward a doctoral 
degree at another institution. A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit 
is required, although some program options may require additional course work. 

The M.A. program requires all students to take a distribution of four courses, 
one each in English literature before 1660. English literature after 1660, Ameri- 
can literature, and a fourth category including composition theory, rhetoric, 
linguistics, and literary theory. In addition, all students must take an introduc- 
tion to research and bibliography, pass a language requirement, take a compre- 
hensive written examination, write a thesis and pass an oral exam on the thesis 
research. 

Beyond these basic requirements, the program permits several emphases. 
Students interested primarily in the study of literature take additional courses in 
literature for a total of eight courses. Students interested in creative writing may 
substitute a workshop in creative writing for one literature course and present a 



164 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

creative work or series of short works as their thesis. Students interested in the 
study and teaching of writing may take the composition concentration, which 
requires specific courses in composition, rhetoric and linguistics; the thesis is on a 
topic in one of these areas. 

The department offers two options for students who hold "A" certification from 
the N. C. Department of Public Instruction. The M.A. with Graduate ("G") 
Certification requires 30 semester hours of graduate credit in English, as out- 
lined above, and 9 semester hours of graduate credit in education. The M.A. with 
Sixth-Year Certification requires 60 semester hours of graduate study beyond 
the bachelor's degree, with course work in English, education and electives. 

Teaching assistantships are available for promising students. These students 
take ENG 504 in the fall semester and, under the supervision of experienced 
teachers, devote half time in subsequent semesters to teaching freshman compo- 
sition. ENG 504 gives graduate credit but does not count toward fulfillment of 
degree requirements. 

Students and faculty in the Department of English are eligible for fellowships 
to participate in programs sponsored by the Folger Institute of Renaissance and 
Eighteenth-Century Studies, which is located in Washington, D.C., at the Folger 
Shakespeare Library. The Department also supports the publication of two 
journals edited by faculty members. The John Donne Journal, which publishes 
scholarship on Renaissance and seventeenth-century literature, and Obsidian II: 
Black Literature in Revieiv, which publishes both creative and scholarly work. 

Applicants to the M.A. program should submit GRE scores (general exam) and 
a writing sample. Undergraduate preparation should include 24 semester hours 
in English, with 12 of these hours in upper-division literature courses. 



Technical Communication 

Associate Professor C. R. Miller, Coordinator 

The Master of Science in Technical Communication is designed to prepare 
professional communicators for advanced positions in industry and research 
organizations; with appropriate electives, students can prepare for careers in 
software documentation, environmental communication, industrial training in 
writing and editing, publications management and related areas. The program 
requires 33 semester hours: four courses in English (in the fields of writing, 
rhetoric and linguistics), one in communication, one in visual media, one in 
technical methods and three electives selected to complement the student's pro- 
fessional goals. Students must also satisfy a requirement for one semester of 
professional work experience, submit a thesis based on a supervised research 
project and pass an oral exam based on the thesis. Prerequisites for the program 
are basic editing, technical writing and computer literacy (ENG 214, ENG 331 
and CSC 200). Applicants should submit GRE scores (general exam) and a 
writing sample. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 165 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NOTE: The prerequisite for all 500-level English courses is upper division or graduate 
standing. 

ENG 504 Problems in College Composition. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Study of 
the history and theory of rhetoric; practice in writing and in literary analysis; preparation 
for the profession of teaching composition and literature. Required of all teaching assis- 
tants in English. Baines, Grimwood, MacKethan 

ENG 515 American Colonial Literature. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. Survey of American literature 
and thought from the beginning to the adoption of the constitution. Representative works 
such as travel and exploration reports, Indian captivity narratives, diaries, journals, auto- 
biographies, sermons and poetry. J. Clark, Prioli 

ENG 521 Advanced Technical Writing and Editing. Preqs.: ENG 2U and 321. 3(2-1) 
F. Advanced study of specialized documents, technical editing and publications manage- 
ment for students planning careers in writing and editing. Course covers software docu- 
mentation, manuals, indexing, style manuals, document design, legibility, readability 
testing, computerized production, on-screen documentation, desk-top publishing and pub- 
lications management issues such as staffing, scheduling, cost-reduction, ethics and 
subcontracting. Covington 

ENG 524 Introduction to Linguistics. Preq.: Grad. standing or 12 hours in ENG. 3(3-0) 
F. Introduction to theoretical linguistics, especially for students in language, writing and 
literature curricula. Phonology, syntax, semantics, history of linguistics; relation of lingu- 
istics to philosophy, sociology and psychology; application of theory to analysis of texts. 

Fennell, Meyers 

ENG 525 Variety in Language. Preq.: Grad. standing or 12 hours in ENG. 3(3-0) S. 
Variety in the use of language, with particular emphasis on American English. Regional 
dialects; sociolinguistic issues related to class and gender; bilingualism; language and 
ethnicity; Black English and Hispanic English; basics of discourse analysis. 

Fennell, Holloway 

ENG 548 Black American Literature. 3(3-0) F. Survey of black American literature 
and its relationships to culture from its beginnings to the present. Representative works 
from the oral tradition, slave narratives, Washington-DuBois controversy and the Harlem 
Renaissance. Writers include Douglass, Washington, Dunbar, Chesnutt, DuBois, Johnson, 
Hughes, Toomer, Hurston, Wright and several more recent figures. 

Holloway, Laryea, MacKethan, Pettis 

ENG 561 Milton. 3(3-0) S. An intensive reading of Milton with attention to background 
materials in the history and culture of seventeenth-century England. Wall, Young 

ENG 575 Southern Writers. 3(3-0) S. A survey of the particular contribution of the 
South to American literature, with intensive study of selected major figures. 

Grimwood, Laryea, MacKethan 

ENG 578 English Drama to 1642. Preqs.: ENG 261 and upper division or grad. stand- 
ing. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Study of English drama from its beginnings in cycle plays to the 
closing of the theaters. Emphasis is placed on Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, excluding 
Shakespeare. Baines, Williams 

ENG 579 Restoration and 18th-Century Drama. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Intensive study of 
the English drama from 1660 to 1800. Durant 



166 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ENG 588 Fiction Writing Workshop. Preq.: ENG U88 or ENG U89 and CI. 3(3-0) F. 
Advanced work in techniques of writing fiction for students with substantial experience in 
writing. Workshop sessions with students commenting on each other's work. 

Kessell, L. Smith 

ENG 589 Poetry Writing Workshop. Preq.: ENG U88 or ENG J,89 and CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Advanced work in techniques of writing poetry for students with substantial experience in 
writing. Workshop sessions with students commenting on each other's work. Barrax 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NOTE: The prerequisite for all 600-level English courses is graduate standing unless addi- 
tional prerequisites are noted. 

ENG 604 Writing: Theory and Research. 3(3-0) F. Contemporary theory about the 
writing process, text structures and the functionsof discourse. Attention U) the assumptions 
and results of different research methods: cognitive, ethnographic and discourse analysis. 
Covers theories and research results relevant to audience, invention, coherence, revision, 
literacy, relations between oral and written discourse, content (including but not emphasiz- 
ing the' classroom context). Carter, Penrose 

ENG 609 Old English Literature. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. An introduction to the language and 
literature of the Old English period (450-1100). Readings will be in the original and will 
include both poetry and prose. Ferster 

ENG 610 Middle English Literature. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A study of major works of 
medieval English literature (exclusive of Chaucer) in the light of dominant intellectual and 
artistic traditions: emphasis is on four works: Piers Ploivmari, Pearl, Sir Gaivain and the 
Green Knight, and Malory's Morte dArthur. Ferster, HoUey 

ENG 620 16th-century Non-Dramatic English Literature. ^(3-0) F. A detailed survey 
of non-dramatic prose and verse of the sixteenth century against the background of Huma- 
nism with the consequent assimilation of classical and continental literary subjects and 
forms. Blank, Hester, Wall 

ENG 62 1 Rhetoric of Science and Technology. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. Study of the relationships among rhetoric, scientific knowledge and technological 
development and of changes in how these relationships have been understood historically. 
Practice in critical analysis of scientific and technical discourse. Consideration of scientific 
and technical language and of public controversy concerning science and technology. 

Katz, C. Miller 

ENG 622 The Rhetoric of Written Discourse. 3(3-0) S. Contemporary rhetorical theory 
and its development from classical rhetoric; emphasis on the differences between oral and 
written communication and the relevance of traditional theory to the purposes and con- 
straints of writing. Special attention to current issues: the revival of invention, argumenta- 
tion and truth, contributions of research in composition. Carter, C. Miller 

ENG 624 Modern English Usage. Preq.: ENG 52U. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An intensive study 
of English grammar, with attention to new developments in structural linguistics and with 
emphasis on current usage. Meyers 

ENG 626 History of the English Language. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. A survey of the growth 
and development of the language from its Indo-European beginnings to the present. 

Meyers 

ENG 630 ITth-Century English Literature. 3(3-0) S. A close examination of the litera- 
ture of F^ngland from 1600 to 1700 with emphasis on major literary figures and movements. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 167 

the development of important literary forms and genres, and the intimate relationship 
between the literature of this period and its philosophical, political and theological back- 
grounds. Hester, Wall, Young 

ENG 640 History of Literary Criticism. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. 
Survey of the history of literary criticism from Antiquity to the early Modern period. 
Introduction to major theoretical definitions of literature and modes of practical criticism. 
Close study of Aristotle's Poetics, Sidney's Apology for Poetrii, Pope's Essay on Criticism. 
Coleridge's Biographia LiteraHa, Eliot's essays and other landmark works in the develop- 
ment of literary criticism. Halperen, Holley, Young 

ENG 641 Contemporary Literary Theory. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) 
S. Suvey of major developments in twentieth century literary theory. Introduction to 
central concepts, issues and theorists in contemporary literary criticism. Examination of 
range of modern critical practices. Study of relations between literary theory and such 
adjacent disciplines as linguistics, anthropology, social theory, psychology and philosophy. 

Ferster, D. Miller 

ENG 650 English Romantic Period. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study of the six major romantic 
poets— Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats; some attention as well to 
the political, social and literary background and to a few minor writers and critics. 

Harrison, D. Miller 

ENG 651 Chaucer. Preqs.: ENG U51 or equivalent and grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. An 
intensive study of the Chaucer canon requiring independent research. Ferster, Holley 

ENG 655 American Romantic Period. 3(3-0) F. A study of the selected works of Foe, 
Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, and Thoreau, with emphasis on their varied contributions 
to the literature and thought of the American romantic movement. 

Bassett, MacKethan, Stein, West 

ENG 658 Studies in Shakespeare. Preqs.: ENG U86 or ENG U87or equivalent and grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study of a particular phase of the Shakespeare canon. 
Emphasis normally on one dramatic genre (tragedy, comedy, history), but occasionally the 
focus may be more limited. Students may register for credit for a maximum of six hours. 

Baines, Champion, Williams 

ENG 660 Victorian Poetry and Critical Prose. 3(3-0) S. Studies in the literature of 
Victorian England; 1837-1901; the major poets and essayists, movements and questions in 
their historical contexts, religious, political and aesthetic. Hargrave, Harrison, King 

ENG 662 18th-century English Literature. 3(3-0) F. The major figures in English 
literature between 1660 and 1790 against the background of social, cultural and religious 
change. Durant, Moore, Wyrick 

ENG 663 18th-century English Novel. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Selected British novels of the 
eighteenth century studied in relation to the history and development of the genre and in the 
light of available critical opinion past and present. Durant, Moore, Wyrick 

ENG 664 Victorian Novel. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. The nineteenth-century British novel 
studied from the perspective of literary history and twentieth-century criticism. King 

ENG 665 American Realism and Naturalism. 3(3-0) S. Concentration on Whitman. 
Dickinson, Twain, James and Dreiser, with briefer attention to Howells, Crane, Norris and 
other realists and naturalists. Bassett, MacKethan, Stein. West 

ENG 670 20th-century British Prose. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An examination of the works of 
the major British writers and literary movements of this century and their historical 
context, religious, political and aesthetic. Halperen, Knowles, Reynolds 



168 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ENG 671 20th-Centur>- British Poetry. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The development of English 
poetry from the rebellion against Victorian and Pre-Raphaelite verse to the present post- 
war scene; special attention to Hardy. Yeats, Eliot, Auden and Thomas. 

Halperen, Know^les, Reynolds 

ENG 675 20th-Centur>' American Prose. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An examination of repre- 
sentative American writers of the novel and short fiction. 

E. Clark, Halperen, Knowles, Reynolds 

ENG 676 20th-century American Poetry. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The development of mod- 
ern American poetry from the rebellion against the romantic and genteel verse of the 
1890's; special attention to Robinson, Frost, Pound, Williams, Stevens and Ransom. 

Bassett, Halperen. Knowles. Reynolds 

ENG 680 20th-century British Drama. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. A survey of modern British 
drama from its beginnings at the turn of the century to the present. Halperen, Knowles 

ENG 681 20th-century American Drama. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. A survey of modern 
American drama centering on major figures. Halperen, Knowles 

ENG 691 Special Topics in Written Communication. Preq.: One 200-level writing 
course. 3(3-0) S. Intensive study of issues in written communication, with special emphasis 
on application of theory to problems in a variety of areas. Seminar discussions and inde- 
pendent research. Graduate Staff 

ENG 692 Special Topics in American Literature. Preq.: Consentof seminar chairman. 
3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study, involving independent research and centering on some 
limited topics from American literature. Graduate Staff 

ENG 693 Special Topics in English Literature. Preq.: Consent of seminar chairman. 
3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study, involving independent research and centering on some 
limited topic from English literature. Graduate Staff 

ENG 698 Bibliography and Methodology. 1-3. Intensive study ofthe bibliography and 
methodology of literary research. Required of all graduate students in English. 

Graduate Staff 

ENG 699 Research in Literature (Thesis). Preq.: Consent of graduate adviser. Credits 
Arranged. F,S. Independent investigation of an advanced literary or linguistic problem 
leading to the writing of a master's thesis. Thesis Director 

Entomology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. D. Harper, Head 

Professor: H. H. Neunzig, (Graduate Administrator 

Profe.^.Hors: J. T. Ambrose, C. S. Apperson, R. C. Axtell, J. S. Bacheler, J. R. 
Baker, J. R. Bradley Jr., W. M. Brooks, W. V. Campbell, W. C. Dauterman, E. 
Hodgson, M. H. Farrier. F. P. Hain, G. G. Kennedy, R. J. Kuhr, J. R. Meyer.G. 
C. Rock, T. J. Sheets, K. A. Sorensen, P. S. Southern, R. E. Stinner, J. W. Van 
Duyn, C. G. Wright; Adjunct Professors: A. L. Chasson, J. R. Fouts, J. E. 
Gibson, J. A. (Goldstein, F. L. Hastings, R. A. Neal, R. M. Philpot; Professors 
Emeriti: F. E. Guthrie, W. J. Mistric Jr., H. B. Moore Jr., R. L. Rabb, R. L. 
Robertson, D. A. Young Jr.; Associate Professors: J. J. Arends, R. L. Branden- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 169 

burg. L. L. Deitz. F. L. Gould. R. C. Hillmann. E. P. Lampert, B. M. Parker, R. 
M. Roe; Associate Professor (USDA): D. M. Jackson; Adjunct Associate Profes- 
sors: C. Y. Kawanishi, H. B. Msitthews Jr.; Assistant Professors: G. J . House, R. 
C. Smart, J. F. Walgenbach; Assistant Professor (USDA): D. W. Keever; 
Adjunct AssiMant Professor: K. J. Giroux 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 
Associate Professors: B. C. Haning. H. M. Linker 

The Department of Entomology* offers graduate training leading to the Mas- 
ter of Science. Master of Agriculture (non-thesis) and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. Major areas of specialization are agricultural entomology, apiculture, 
behavior, ecology, forest entomology, host-plant resistance, invertebrate pathol- 
ogy, medical and veterinary entomology, nutrition, pesticide analysis, pesticide 
fate in soil and water, pest management, physiology, population dynamics, soil 
entomology, systems analysis, taxonomy and toxicology. 

Opportunities exist for training in both applied and fundamental phases of 
entomology. Population management concepts are emphasized in the applied 
entomolog\' and pest management programs. The applied phases are influenced 
by the State's agriculture, in which corn, tobacco, cotton, peanuts, soybeans, 
small grains, fruits, vegetables, livestock and forestry are important compo- 
nents. The rapidly expanding tourist industry and the diverse habitats of the 
State, extending from the mountains to the sea, provide unique opportunities for 
research on insects and related arthropods affecting man. A cooperative arrange- 
ment with the College of Forest Resources provides majors in forest entomology. 
The program in medical and veterinary entomology includes both applied and 
fundamental research and provides the opportunity for training at the School of 
Public Health, UNC. Chapel Hill. Students electing graduate work in entomol- 
ogy^ are expected to have strong backgrounds in biological sciences, chemistry 
and mathematics. Undergraduate preparation in entomolog>' is not required. 

Strong interdepartmental programs in ecology, physiology and toxicology 
include faculty members from the Department of Entomology and provide grad- 
uate training for entomology students desiring interdisciplinary graduate 
degrees. Additionally, interinstitutional courses are available on the nearby 
campuses of Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. The presence of numerous federal and industry laboratories in the nearby 
Research Triangle Park further enhances entomology graduate training. 

The departmental research, extension and training programs are housed in a 
complex of facilities including a pesticide residue research laboratory, biochem- 
istry and toxicology laboratories, insect rearing rooms, greenhouses and field 
stations. An adjacent phytotron or bioclimatic facility provides an opportunity 
for ecological and behavioral studies under controlled conditions. Ultrastructu- 
ral investigations are conducted in the electron microscope facility of the College 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Extensive computer facilities and statistical 
services are available in the department and on campus. 

See a description of the Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory elsewhere in 
this bulletin. 

*This department does require GRE scores. 



170 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ENT (ZO) 425 General Entomology. Preq.: ZO 201 or equivalent. 3(2-3) F,Sum. 

Related Course: 

PM 415 Principles and Systems of Integrated Pest Management. Preqs.: BO (ZO) 
mt. PPS15, ENT 312; Coreq.: CS AU. MS-3) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 502 Insect Diversity. Preq.: ENT 425 or equivalent. M2-U) F. Surveys the diversity 
of insect biology and structure empliasizing the identification of adults; includes speciation, 
evolutionary relationships, approaches to classification, nomenclature, zoogeography and 
techniques of collection. Deitz 

ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects. Preqs.: Twelve hrs. of biology, nine hrs. of CH, 
three hrs. of BCH. M3-3) S. The morphology, histology and function of the organ systems of 
insects. Basic physiological principles discussed in the context of insect growth and devel- 
opment. The laboratory designed to give students practical experience with modern physio- 
logical techniques. Roe 

ENT (ZO) 509 Ecology of Stream Invertebrates. U(2-6) S. (See zoology.) 

ENT 520 Insect Pathology. Preqs.: ENT 425 and MB 401 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. 
A treatment of the noninfectious and infectious diseases of insects, the etiological agents 
and infectious processes involved, immunological responses and applications. Brooks 

ENT 531 Insect Ecology. Preqs.: ENT 425 and BO (ZO) 560 or equivalent. 3(2-2) F. Alt. 
yrs. The interrelationships among insects and components of their effective environments 
which result in dynamic spatial and temporal patterns of particular species. Also, the 
diverse roles of insects in the structure and function of communities and ecosystems. 

Gould 

ENT 54 1 Immature Insects. Preq.: ENT 502 or equivalent. 3(1-4) F. Alt. yrs. Biology and 
taxonomy of immature insects with emphasis on identification of the larval stage of endop- 
terygote orders. A collection of immatures and associated reared adults is required. 

Neunzig 

ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Control. Pre(7..£;Arr5i;2 or 56»i. 3(2-2) F. The princi- 
ples underlying modern methods for protecting food, clothing, shelter and health from 
insect attack. Lampert 

ENT 562 Insect Pest Management in Agricultural Crops. Preq.: ENT 550. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. Critical review of the biology and ecology of representative beneficial and injurious 
insects and arachnids ofagricultural crops and the advantages and limitations of advanced 
concepts of their management in selected agroecosystems. Bradley, Kennedy, Rock 

ENT (FOR) 565 Advanced Forest Entomology. Preq.: ENT 301 or ENT 502 or CI. 

3(2-2) S. Alt. yrs. Covers the important insect pests of forest and shade trees including 
regeneration pests, defoliating insects, inner-bark borers, wood borers, sucking insects, 
and bud, twig and root feeding insects. Also includes concepts in forest pest management 
and population dynamics. Hain 

ENT (ZO) 582 Medical and Veterinary Entomology. Preqs.: ENT 312 or 425 and ZO 

315 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. The morphology, taxonomy, biology and control of the 
arthropod parasites and disease vectors of man and animals. The ecology and behavior of 
vectors in relation to disease transmission and control. Axtell 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 171 

ENT 590 Special Problems. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original research on 
special problems in entomology not related to a thesis problem. Provides experience and 
training in research. Graduate Staff 

ENT 591 Special Topics in Entomology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. A variable 
credit lecture and laboratory series offering topics such as morphology, physiology, syste- 
matics, behavior, biological control, urban and stored product pests, nursery and ornamen- 
tal pests, host plant resistance, information retrieval, biological monitoring and sampling, 
population modelling, extension entomology and computer methods. Graduate Staff 

ENT 592 Agricultural Entomology Practicum. Preq.: Economic entomology (ENT 562 
recommended). 3(0-9) Sum. Alt. yrs. Practical experience in research, extension and com- 
mercial aspects of insect pest management on a broad range of agricultural crops under 
actual field conditions. Class meets 9 hours each Friday for 10 weeks from early June to 
mid-August. Students should register for second summer session. Bradley 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENT 622 Insect Toxicology. Preqs.: ENT 550, BCH 551 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. 
The relation of chemical structure to insect toxicity, the mode of action of toxicants used to 
kill insects, the metabolism of insecticides in plant and animal systems, the selectivity 
within the cholinesterase inhibitors and other selective mechanisms and the analysis of 
insecticide residues will be discussed. Dauterman 

ENT 690 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in ENT or closely allied fields. 1(1-0) F,S. 
Discussion of entomological topics selected and assigned by seminar chairman. 

Graduate Staff 

ENT 699 Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original research in 
connection with thesis problem in entomology. Graduate Staff 

Fiber and Polymer Science 

ASSOCIATED GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor S. P. Hersh, Chairman and Program Director 

Professors: R. L. Barker, S. K. Batra, K. R. Beck, D. R. Buchanan, J. A. Cuculo, A. 
H. M. El-Shiekh, R. E. Fornes, H. S. Freeman, R. D. Gilbert, P. L. Grady, B. S. 
Gupta, H. B. Hopfenberg, C. D. Livengood, P. R. Lord, R. McGregor, G. N. 
Mock, M. H. M. Mohamed, H. G. Olf, M. H. Theil, C. Tomasino, P. A. Tucker, C. 
F. Zorowski; Adjunct Professors: J. E. Hendrix, H. F. Mark; Professors Eme- 
riti: J. F. Bogdan, D. M. Gates, D. W. Chaney, T. W. George, D. S. Hamby, H. A. 
Rutherford, V. T. Stannett, W. C. Stuckey Jr., W. K. Walsh, W. M. Whaley, R. 
W. Work; Associate Professors: T. J. Little, C. B. Smith; Associate Professors 
Emeriti: T. H. Guion, T. G. Rochow; Assistant Professors: P. Banks- Lee, A. C. 
Clapp, T. G. Clapp, H. Hamouda, S. M. Hudson, J. W. Rucker; Visiting Assist- 
ant Professor: T. K. Ghosh 

Fiber and polymer science is a multidisciplinary program bringing together 
the disciplines of mathematics, chemistry and physics and the application of 
engineering principles for the development of independent scholars versed in the 
field of fiber materials science. The program is administered by the College of 
Textiles and leads to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Students majoring in the 



172 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

physical sciences, mathematics, textiles or engineering and having at least a "B" 
grade in their undergraduate major will normally qualify for admission. 

Fiber and polymer science is concerned with polymeric materials, fibers pro- 
duced from them, fiber assemblies in one-, two-and three-dimensional forms and 
chemical modification of fiber assemblies. This broad field of study permits a 
wide range of useful concentrations. The candidate is expected to penetrate 
deeply into one area of specialization and to acquire a reasonable perspective in 
other relevant subject matter. Generally specialization occurs within the area of 
(1) polymer chemistry and synthesis, (2) fiber and polymer physics and physical 
chemistry, (3) structural mechanics of textile materials, (4) formation and pro- 
cessing of fibers and fibrous textile structures or (5) dyeing and chemical modifi- 
cation of textile materials. The student's research is based within one of these 
areas. 

Ample laboratory space is available and there are a number of specialized 
laboratories equipped to support doctoral investigations. Other facilities and 
research equipment which may be used in fiber and polymer science research 
programs are available in cooperating departments on campus. The Burlington 
Textiles Library houses one of the most complete collections of polymer, fiber and 
textile literature. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Doctor of Philosophy— An advisory committee chaired by a member of the fiber 
and polymer science faculty is formed as soon as possible to develop with the 
student a plan of study designed to enable one to acquire the comprehensive 
knowledge required to pass the qualifying cumulative examinations. 

There are no definite requirements in credit hours for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. A student's program of study is designed around the student's special 
interests, while maintaining the coherence and breadth essential for professional 
development and excellence in research. A reading knowledge of one foreign 
language is required. 

Doctor of Philosophy Minor — Ph.D. candidates who designate a named minor 
in fiber and polymer science will be required to take nine credit hours in related 
courses approved by the minor representative on the student's advisory 
committee. 

Communications concerning this program should be directed to the Chair of 
the Committee for the Fiber and Polymer Science Program, College of Textiles, 
North Carolina State University. 

COURSE OFFERINGS* 

(See departmental listing for descriptions.) 
GENERAL COURSES 
T 402 Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Fiber Formation. 
TC (CH) 461 Introduction to Fiber-Forming Polymers. 

'Extensive use may be made of graduate course offerings in other schools on campus when developing the minor field. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 173 

TC 504 Fiber Formation— Theory and Practice. 

TC (CH, MAT) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers-Bulk Properties. 

TES 500 Fiber and Polymer Microscopy. 

TES 505 Textile Instrumentation and Control Systems. 

TES 561 Mechanical and Rheological Properties of Fibrous Material. 

TES (MAT) 563 Characterization of Structure of Fiber Forming Polymers. 

TC 591 Special Topics in Textile Science. 

TES (TC) 691 Special Topics in Fiber Science. 

COURSES IN AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION 

Polymer Chemistry and Synthesis 
TC 520 Chemistry of Dyes and Color. 

TC 521 Dye Synthesis Laboratory. 

TC 530 The Chemistry of Textile Auxiliaries. 

TC 561 Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. 

TC (CHE) 671 Special Topics in Polymer Science. 

Polymer Physics and Physical Chemistry 

TES 500 Fiber and Polymer Microscopy. 

TC 504 Fiber Formation— Theory and Practice. 

TC 505 Theory of Dyeing. 

TC (CH, MAT) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Bulk Properties. 

TC (CH, MAT) 662 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers-Solution Properties. 

TC (CHE) 569 Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. 

TC (CHE) 570 Radiation Chemistry and Technology of Polymeric Systems. 

TC (CHE) 669 Diffusion in Polymers. 

TES 562 Physical Properties of Fiber Forming Polymers, Fibers and Fibrous 

Structures. 

TES (TC) 691 Special Topics in Fiber Science. 



174 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Mechani4;s of Textile Materials and Processes 

TES 520 Yarn Processing Dynamics. 

TES 549 Warp Knit Engineering and Structural Design. 

TES 555 Production Mechanics and Properties of Woven Fabrics. 

TES 640 Physical and Mechanical Properties of Knitted Fabrics. 

TES 663 Mechanics of Twisted Structures. 

TES 664 Mechanics of Fabric Structures. 

Food Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. R. Lineback, Head 

Professor V. A. Jones, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: H. R. BallJr., R. E. Carawan, D. E. CarrollJr., G. L. Catignani, H. B. 
Craig. M. E. Gregory, D. D. Hamann, H. M. Hassan, H. N. Jacobson, T. R. 
Klaenhammer, T. C. Lanier, J. L. Oblinger, H. E. Swaisgood, K. R. Swartzel, 
F. R. Tarver Jr., C. T. Young; Professors (USDA): H. P. Fleming, R. F. 
McFeeters, W. M. Walter Jr.; Adjunct Professor: R. A. Neal; Professors 
Emeriti: L. W. Aurand, T. A. Bell. T. N. Blumer, E. S. Cofer, M. W. Hoover, L 
D. Jones, W. M. Roberts, M. L. Speck, F. B. Thomas, F. G. Warren; Associate 
Professors: E. A. Foegeding, P. M. Foegeding, A. P. Hansen. D. H. Pilkington, 
J. E. Rushing, S. J. Schwartz, B. W. Sheldon, L. G. Turner, D. R. Ward; 
Assistant Professors: J . C. Allen. L. C. Boyd, D. K. Larick; Visiting Research 
Assistant Professor: N. A. Klapes 

Programs of study leading to the Master of Agriculture. Master of Life Scien- 
ces. Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered by the 
Department of Food Science. 

Areas of study and research include food chemistry, food microbiology, food 
engineering, nutrition and food process and product development. These areas 
involve all foods including dairy products, fruits, meats, poultry products, sea- 
food, nutmeats and vegetables. Supporting course work and cooperative research 
are offered in areas such as biochemistry, chemistry, engineering, genetics, 
microbiology, nutrition, toxicology and biotechnology. 

Because of the diversity of disciplines and wide range of opportunities in food 
science, each student and his/her advisory committee are granted considerable 
flexibility in developing a graduate program tailored to the student's interests 
and re.search needs. Each program must conform to guidelines of the Graduate 
School (see Graduate Programs) and food science policies and procedures (avail- 
able from the Department of Food Science). All graduate students are eligible for 
assignment as teaching assistants in food science courses. The Master of Science 
program requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of work including a thesis. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 175 

The Master of Agriculture and Master of Life Sciences programs require a 
minimum of 36 semester hours; no thesis is required, but at least four semester 
hours of special problems are required. There are no requirements for 600-level 
courses in the Master of Agriculture and Master of Life Sciences programs. The 
total semester hours of work for the Ph.D. degree are established by the advisory 
committee to meet the objectives of the student's program. No foreign language is 
required. 

The department participates in interdepartmental graduate student training 
programs such as marine science, toxicology, biotechnology and nutrition. 

Excellent laboratory, pilot plant, library and computer facilities, as well as 
graduate assistantships, are available to support qualified candidates. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

FS 400 Foods and Nutrition. Preq.: CH 220. 3(3-0) F. 

FS 402 Food Chemistry. Preq.: CH 220 or CH 221. 3(2-3) F. 

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology. Preq.: MB iOl. 3(2-3) F. 

FS 416 Quality Control of Food Products. Preqs.: FS W2, MB AOl. 3(2-3) S. 

FS 421 Food Preservation. Coreq.: MB UOl. 3(2-3) F. 

FS 423 Muscle Food Technology. Preqs.: FS 322, FS h21, FS U02. 3(2-3) S. 

FS 425 Processing Dairy Products. Preqs.: FS 32U, FS U21. 3(2-3) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FS 504 Food Proteins and Enzymes. Preq.: FS Jf02 or BCH U51. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. An 
advanced course in food chemistry with emphasis on proteins and enzymes of particular 
importance to foods. Protein interactions and their effect on the physical-chemical charac- 
teristics of a product. Particular emphasis on the preparation and kinetic properties of 
immobilized enzymes and their use as biochemical reactors in processing operations or as 
specific electrodes for analytical purposes. Swaisgood 

FS 51 1 Food Research and Development. Preqs.: FS 331, FS h02, FS (MB) U05. 3(2-3) 
S. A study of the scientific principles underlying the development of new and improved food 
products and processes. The study of specific food industry problems by the case method. 
Special emphasis on the application of research and development principles to meat, 
poultry and fisheries industries. Lanier 

FS (NTR) 530 Human Nutrition. Preqs.: FS WO or NTR A15 or 419; BCH J^Sl. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. Biochemical and physiological bases of nutrition. Human nutrient requirements, 
assessment of nutritional status, clinical and subclinical disorders resulting from nutrient 
deficiencies or inadequacies. Catignani 

FS (HS) 562 Post-Harvest Physiology. 3(3-0) S. (See horticultural science.) 

FS 580 Food Kinetics. Preqs.: FS 212, FS U02, FS W5, MA 212 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Basic and applied kinetic principles, development and use of kinetic data of food compo- 
nents, food processing system design, system modeling, system evaluation and storage 
stability considerations. Swartzel 

FS (BAE) 585 Food Rheology. Preqs.: FS 331 or MAE 3n. 3(2-3) F. Principles and 
methods for measuring rheological properties. Theories of elastic, viscous, viscoelastic and 
viscoplastic behavior and relationships to food texture and commodity damage during 



176 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

harvest, handling and processing. Influence of time, composition and processing. Influence 
of time, composition and processing on rheological properties. Hamann 

FS 591 Special Problems in Food Science. Preq.: Grad. or sr. standing. Max. 6. 
F.S.Sum. Analysis of scientific, engineering and economic problems of current interest in 
foods. The problems are designed to provide training and experience in research. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FS (NTR) 606 Vitamin Metabolism. 2(2-0) F. (See nutrition.) 

FS 680 Seminar in Food Science. 1(1-0) F,S. Preparation and presentation of scientific 
papers, progress reports and research and special topics of interest in foods. 

Graduate Staff 

FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. 
Directed research in a specialized phase of food science designed to provide experience in 
research methodology and philosophy. Graduate Staff 

FS 699 Research in Food Science. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Original research pre- 
paratory to the thesis for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

Graduate Staff 

Foreign Languages and Literatures 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor 3. H. Stewart, Head 

Professors: G. F. Gonzalez, J. R. Kelly, M. Paschal, G. G. Smith, M. A. F. Witt; 
Professors Emeriti: A. A. Gonzalez, G. W. Poland, E. M. Stack; Associate 
Professors: A. C. Malinowski, E. W. Rollins Jr., S .E. Simonsen; Associate 
Professor Emeritus: H. Tucker Jr.; Assistant Professor: L. Mykyta 

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers courses to assist 
graduate students in preparing to use modern foreign languages in research and 
advanced study. These courses are not open to undergraduates. 

With special permission of the Graduate School, certification may be obtained 
in languages not normally taught by the department. 

*FLF 401 French for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. Basic French grammar, with 
special attention to characteristics of formal expository style, and illustrative readings. 
Study of extracts from scholarly publications in the students' areas of research. Graduate 
language certification granted on satisfactory completion of the course. 

*FLG 401 German for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. Basic German grammar, with 
special attention to characteristics of formal expository style, and illustrative readings. 
Study of extracts from scholarly publications in the students' areas of research. Graduate 
language certification granted on satisfactory completion of the course. 

*FLS 401 Spanish for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. Basic Spanish grammar, with 
special attention to characteristics of formal expository style, and illustrative readings. 
Study of extracts from scholarly publications in the students' areas of research. Graduate 
language certification granted on satisfactory completion of the course. 

•These courses are desig-ned to be audited and credits do not apply toward advanced degrees. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 177 

Forestry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor A. W. Cooper, Head 

Professor D. L. Holley Jr., Graduate Administrator 

Professors: D. A. Adams, E. B. Cowling, C. B. Davey, H. A. Devine, P. D. Doerr, 
M. H. Farrier. E. C. Franklin, D. J. Frederick, L. F. Grand, W. L. Hafley, F. P. 
Hain, A. E. Hassan, R. C. Kellison, S. Khorram, R. L. Noble, L. C. Saylor, R. R. 
Sederoff, A. G. Wollum II; Professor (USDA): D. E. Moreland; Professors 
(USFS): F. E. Bridgwater Jr., G. Namkoong; Adjunct Professors: G. L. 
DeBarr, G. F. Dutrow, J. D. Hair, R. W. Stonecypher, C. G. Wells; Professors 
Emeriti: J. W. Duffield, J. 0. Lammi, W. D. Miller, T. 0. Perry, R. J. Preston, B. 
J. ZoheV, Associate Professors: H. L. Allen Jr., H. V. Amerson, R. I. Bruck, J. D. 
Gregory, L. E. Hinesley, J. B. Jett Jr., J.G. Laarman,R. A. Lancia, R. Lea, R. R. 
Perdue, R. A. Powell, R. J. Weir, J. N. Woodman; Adjunct Associate Professors: 
D. L. Bramlett, R. G. Campbell, J. R. Jorgensen, Assistant Professors: R. R. 
Braham, L. J. Frampton Jr., S. E. McKeand, J. P. Roise, W. D. Smith, A.-M. 
Stomp; Assistant Professor (USFS): J. E. de Steiguer; Adjunct Assistant Pro- 
fessors: W. E. Ladrach, R. B. McCullough, G. A. Ruark, H. D. Smith; Research 
Associate: W. S. Dvorak; Research Assistant Professors: A. R. Gillespie, L. 
Tolley-Henry; Extension Forest Resources Specialist: E. J. Jones 

The Department of Forestry offers graduate work leading to the degrees of 
Master of Forestry, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Because of the 
diversity of disciplines and the wide range of opportunities in forestry, each of 
these degrees allows considerable flexibility in developing programs of graduate 
study tailored to the student's objectives. In addition, graduate students in the 
Department of Forestry may pursue three interdisciplinary graduate degrees: 
Master of Wildlife Biology, Master of Science in wildlife biology and Master of 
Science in ecology. 

The Master of Forestry is a professional degree designed to broaden and extend 
knowledge in the scholarly disciplines of forestry. The program emphasizes 
course work and application of principles. A thesis is not required. Two options 
are available: one requires 36 hours of course work and the other requires 30 
hours plus a special project. 

The Master of Science degree emphasizes training and experience in research. 
This degree typically leads to specialization in one of the disciplines of forestry. 
Requirements include 30 hours of course work and a thesis. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is available to students who demonstrate 
outstanding intellectual capacity and the ability to conduct original research and 
scholarly work at the highest levels. There is no foreign language requirement 
and no specific credit hour requirement; however, the student's advisory commit- 
tee will insist on a rigorous and appropriate program of study and research. 

All applicants for graduate study in forestry must take the Graduate Record 
Examination General Test and submit scores as part of their application. Stu- 
dents not holding an undergraduate degree in forestry may be admitted for 



178 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

graduate study, but they must lengthen their programs to obtain appropriate 
background courses in forestry. 

The department offers graduate instruction in all of the major areas of for- 
estry. The faculty has professional expertise and on-going research in the follow- 
ing areas: atmospheric impacts, biometrics, biotechnology and pine tissue cul- 
ture, computer applications, ecology, economics, engineering, entomology, en- 
vironmental impact assessment, forest management, genetics and tree breeding, 
hydrology and watershed management, international development, operations 
research, plant pathology, remote sensing and computer mapping, resource 
planning and administration, silviculture, soils and fertilization, tree physiology, 
wildlife biology, and wildlife management. Strong supporting departments on 
campus increase opportunities for broad and thorough training. Relationships 
with these departments are strengthened by many joint and associate faculty 
appointments. In addition, an adjunct faculty of 12 distinguished scientists and 
practitioners working in industry and government are available to serve on 
student advisory committees. 

Facilities for forest biological research include a phytotron, greenhouses and a 
small experimental nursery. The experimental and production forests of the 
School total more than 80,000 acres. The Hofmann Forest on the Coastal Plain, 
the Goodwin Forest in the Sandhills, and the Schenck, Hope Valley and Hill 
Forests in the Piedmont provide a variety of forest types and problems in the 
management of timber, water, wildlife and recreational resources. 

The department has formal research ties with forest industry and public 
agencies through its four research and development cooperatives (Tree Improve- 
ment, Hardwood Research, Forest Nutrition and Central America and Mexico 
Coniferous Resources), the Small Woodlot Research and Development Program, 
the Atmospheric Impacts Research Program, and the College's Forest Biology 
Research Center (which administers major projects on tissue culture, site pro- 
ductivity and forest biotechnology). Much of the department's research is con- 
ducted on forest industry lands in the Southeast. A significant number of faculty 
and graduate students are involved in tropical forestry projects. 

Inquiries concerning graduate study should be directed to the Graduate 
Administrator, Department of Forestry, Box 8002, North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, Raleigh, NC 27695-8002. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

FOR 401 Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management. Preq.: SSC 200. M3-3) F. 

FOR (FW) 404 Forest Wildlife Management. Preqs.: BS 100 or equivalent plus 8 hours 
of biological sciences; advanced undergrad. or grad. student. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR 405 Forest Management. Preqs.: FOR 319, 37U; Coreq.: FOR A3U. U{2-U) F. 

FOR 406 Forest Inventory, Analysis and Planning. Preqs.: FOR 273, 353, ^05, ST 312. 
MO-16) S. 

FOR 411 Forest Tree Improvement. Preq.: Jr. or sr. standing in FOR. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR 412 Forest Types of the Southeast. Preq.: FOR 212. 2(1-3) S. Alt. yrs. 

FOR 422 Forest Business: Consulting and Procurement. Preq.: Jr. standing in fore- 
stry. 3(2-2) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 179 

FOR (WPS) 423 Forest Machinery and Systems. Preq.: Jr. standing in FOR, WSTor 
BAE. 3(2-3) F. 

FOR (WPS) 434 Decision Making in Forestry and Wood Products. Preqs.: FOR 
(WPS) 273, MA 113 and lU. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Policy and Management. Preq.: Jr. standing. U(3-2) S. 

FOR 491 Senior Problems in Forestry. Preq.: Consent of department. 1-6. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 510 Quantitative Forest Genetics Methods. Preqs.: GN 506, ST 512. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Fundamental principles and procedures for partitioning experimental variance, esti- 
mating parameters of interest from different mating schemes and experimental designs 
and their uses in making tree breeding decisions. Bridgwater 

FOR 511 Tree Improvement Research Techniques. Preq.: FOR ill or GN Ull. 3(1-U) 
S. Alt. yrs. Research methods involved in forest tree breeding and genetics programs. 
Emphasis placed on laboratory, greenhouse and field research techniques. Summary and 
presentation of research results also stressed. Jett, Zobel 

FOR 512 Forest Economics. Preq.: Basic course in economics. 3(3-0) S. Economics 
applied to problems in forest management, including timber demand and supply models, 
optimal rotation length, benefit-cost analysis of forestry projects, impacts of forest taxation 
and consideration of non-market forest goods and services. Laarman 

FOR (PP) 518 Advanced Forest Pathology. 3(3-0) Alt. F. (See plant pathology.) 

FOR 534 Advanced Forest Management Planning. Preq.: FORJt05 or FOR h3U or OR 

501; Coreq.: FOR 572 A. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. History, principles, structures and use of modern 
forest management planning and decision-making techniques. Emphasis on optimization 
procedures and public forest management. Roise 

FOR 540 Advanced Dendrology. Preq.: BO U03 or FOR 212. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. Identifi- 
cation and life histories of native and naturalized woody plants. Use of taxonomic manuals 
and literature. Identification of problematic groups. Concentration on North America, 
with discussion of other continents. Overnight field trips to natural forest communities. 

Braham 

FOR (ENT) 565 Advanced Forest Entomology. 3(2-2) S. (See entomology.) 

FOR 571 Advanced Topics in Growth and Yield. Preqs.: FOR 272, ST 312. 3(3-0) S. 
Development and application of site index, volume and forest yield models. Primary 
emphasis on underlying biological and mensurational assumptions and their impact on 
application. Hafley 

FOR 572A,B Forest Management Policies on the Public Lands. 2(2-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
History, development and current status of policies relating to forest management on the 
public lands. FOR 572A deals with history and policies through passage of the National 
Forest Management Act. FOR 572B deals with current issues. Students may enroll in 
either FOR 572A or FOR 572A and FOR 572B but not FOR 572B alone. Cooper 

FOR 580 Soil-Machine Interactions in Forestry Operations. Preq.: FOR A23. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. Mechanics of interactions between forestry soils and tillage and traction devices; 
determination of relevant physical properties of soil; analyses of stresses and strains in soil 
due to machine-applied loads; experimental and analytical methods for synthesizing char- 
acteristics of overall systems. Hassan 



180 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR 583 Tropical Forestry. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Principles of tropical 
ecology, dendrology and agroforestry. Establishment and management of tropical planta- 
tions and natural stands. Operation and management of tropical nurseries. Economics of 
the international forest products trade. Governmental regulations, policies and permit 
procedures. Davey, Laarman, Ladrach 

FOR (UNI) 584 The Practice of Environmental Impact Assessment. Jf(0-8) F. Alt. 
yrti. Students (in teams) inventory natural resources in a large watershed, predict develop- 
ment at year 2000, analyze impact upon the natural resource base and compile results as an 
environmental impact assessment. Techniques include map and aerial photo interpreta- 
tion, timber and wildlife habitat inventory, erosion estimation, curve fitting, technical 
writing, computer modeling and project organization and management. Adams 

FOR ( F W) 585 Advanced Wildlife Habitat Management. Preqs.: ZO (FW) 553 and ZO 
(FW) 554- 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. Assessing and modeling habitat capability for wildlife species 
discussed and evaluated. Students develop models of habitat requirements for wildlife 
species and integrate the models into wildlife management plans. Laboratory exercises 
include manipulation of habitat management computer packages and development of a 
wildlife management plan using computer cartographic techniques. Lancia 

FOR 592 Special Topics in Forestry. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Individual students 
or groups of students, under the direction of a faculty member, may explore topics of special 
interest not covered by existing courses. Format may consist of readings and independent 
study, problems or research not related to thesis. Also used to develop and test new 500-level 
courses. Graduate Staff 

FOR 593 Colloquium on Tropical Forestry. 1(1-0) S. Overview of tropical forest 
resources emphasizing biological, economic and social issues. Concepts and case studies 
covering ecological, silvicultural, cultural and socio-economic principles. Graduate Staff 

FOR (FW) 594 Seminar in Wildlife Management. 1(1-0) S. Alt. yrs. Current topics and 
issues in wildlife biology and management discussed. Students select and research topics, 
give seminars and lead group Lancia 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FOR 601 Advanced Hydrology. Preqs.: FORAOl, ST 512. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The physical 
concepts of water movement through the hydrologic cycle and interactions with ecosystem 
components discussed. Mathematical approaches to characterizing and quantifying hydro- 
logic processes derived and applied to problem solutions. Experimental design and statis- 
tics needed for collecting and analyzing hydrologic data discussed and utilized. Develop- 
ment and use of simulation models considered. Gregory 

FOR (GN) 611 Forest Genetics. Preq.: GN ill or CI. 3(3-0) S. Application of genetic 
principles to silviculture, management and wood utilization. Emphasis is on variation in 
wild populations, the bases for selection of desirable qualities and fundamentals of con- 
trolled breeding. McKeand, Zobel 

FOR (GN) 612 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Genetics. Preqs.: GN(FOR) 611, GN 
(ST) 626 or GN (ANS) 603 or CI. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Advanced topics in statistics and 
population genetics pertinent to current research problems in genetics with special appli- 
cations to forestry. Basic statistical and genetic theory reviewed as bases for intensive study 
of selection theory and experimental and mating design evaluation. The genetics of natural 
populations studied for evolutionary interest as well as for their implications to breeding 
theory. Namkoong 

FOR 613 Special Topics in Silviculture. Preq.: FORSOi. 3(3-0) F. Critical examination 
of selected silvicultural topics, with special emphasis on concepts and phenomena which 
distinguish forests from other biotic communities and silviculture from other fields of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 181 

applied biolog>'. Emphasis on intensive silviculture in the United States and selected 
international locations. A written research proposal is a course requirement. Frederick 

FOR 614 Advanced Topics in Administration of Forest Resources. Preq.: FOR 613. 
3(3-0) S. State-of-the-art practices for administering commercial forest lands explicitly 
detailed for advanced forestry graduate students. The economics of intensive and extensive 
management, the effect of management policies on timber yields and the financial stability 
of the forest industry set forth using governmental and industrial perspectives. 

Kellison, Lea 

FOR 672 Current Issues in Natural Resource Policy. 2(2-0) S. Alt. yrs. Discussion of 
the current and historical dimensions of major natural resource policy issues, including 
water and air pollution control, land use planning, public works development projects, 
wilderness, hazardous waste disposal and land preservation. Adams, Cooper, Devine 

FOR (SSC) 673 Forest Productivity: Edaphic Relationships. Preqs.: BO (ZO) 560, SSC 
532. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. An advanced consideration of forest productivity; edaphic and other 
environmental factors influencing productivity; and the influence of forest management 
practices on forest soil properties and processes. Allen 

FOR 689 Seminar in Forest Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F. Philosophy and 
objectives of scientific research and the steps in the research process. Basic and applied 
research, inductive and deductive reasoning and the need for hypothesis development and 
testing as a basis for scientific research. Special emphasis on the preparation of study plans, 
graduate theses, published articles and technical presentations. Franklin 

FOR 691 Graduate Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S,Sum. Weekly seminar in which students regis- 
tered for the course present the results of research and special projects. All graduate 
students and faculty in the department invited to attend and join the discussion. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR 692 Advanced Topics in Forestry. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Individual stu- 
dents or groups of students, under the direction of a faculty member, may explore topics of 
special interest not covered by existing courses. Format may consist of readings and 
independent study, problems or research not related to dissertation. Also used to develop 
and test new 600-level courses. Graduate Staff 

FOR 699 Research in Forestry. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Individual research, 
under faculty supervision, that will furnish material for a thesis or dissertation. 

Graduate Staff 

Genetics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. R. Atchley, Head 

Professors: G. C. Bewley, W. D. Hanson, W. E. Kloos, C. S. Levings III, D. F. 
Matzinger, W. H. McKenzie. R. H. Moll, J. G. Scandalios, A. C. Triantaphyllou; 
Professor (USDA): C. W. Stuber; Professor (USFS): G. Namkoong; Adjunct 
Professor: M. D. Chilton; Professors Emeriti: C. H. Bostian, D. S. Grosch, T. J. 
Mann, L. E. Meti\er; Associate Professors: S. E. Curtis, T. H. Emigh, T. F. C. 
Mackay, S. L. Spiker; Assistant Professors: M. T. Andrews, M. A. Conkling 



182 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: J. L. Apple, F. B. Armstrong, C. C. Cockerham, E. J. Eisen, M. M. 
Goodman, C. L. Markert, B. T. McDaniel, J. 0. Rawlings. 0. W. Robison, L. C. 
Saylor. H. E. Schaffer, R. R. Sederoff, W. F. Thompson. D. H. Timothy, B. S. 
Weir, E. A. Wernsman; Prof essors Emeriti: J . F. Chaplin, E. W. Glazener, F. L. 
Haynes, J. E. Legates, L. L. Phillips; Associate Professors: R. M. Petters, K. G. 
Tatchell; Assistant Professors: R. S. Boston, D. M. Miller 

Graduate study under the direction of the genetics faculty may enable the 
student to qualify for the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. A 
candidate for the master's degree must acquire a thorough understanding of 
genetics and its relation to other biological disciplines and must present a thesis 
based upon one's own research. In addition to a comprehensive knowledge of his 
or her field, a candidate for the doctorate must demonstrate a capacity for 
independent investigation and scholarship in genetics. 

At North Carolina State University there are no sharp divisions along depart- 
mental lines or between theoretical and applied aspects of genetics research. The 
members and associate members of the genetics faculty are located in eight 
different departments of the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Forest 
Resources and Physical and Mathematical Sciences. They are studying a wide 
range of genetic problems and are utilizing not only the "classic" laboratory 
materials (maize, bacteria, Drosophilia, tobacco, mice), but also farm animals 
and agricultural and forest plants of the region. A student has, therefore, a wide 
choice of research problems in any of the following fields: cytology and cytogenet- 
ics, microbial and biochemical genetics, molecular and developmental genetics, 
evolution and speciation, quantitative and population genetics and the applica- 
tion of genetics to breeding methodology. 

Departmental offices and laboratories are located in Gardner Hall with green- 
house facilities adjacent to the building. A genetics garden for use in intensive 
research with plants and teaching functions is located three miles from the 
offices. The departmental staff and the associate faculty members in animal 
science, biochemistry, botany, crop science, horticultural science, microbiology, 
plant pathology, statistics and the College of Forest Resources are fortunate in 
being able to draw upon the extensive facilities of the North Carolina Agricul- 
tural Research Service. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

GN 41 1 The Principles of Genetics. Preqs.: BS 100, jr. standing. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum.. 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory. Preq. or coreq.: GN ill. 1(0-2) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 504 Human Genetics. Preq.: GN 301 or 1^11 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. The basic 
principles needed for an understanding of the genetics of man. Current knowledge and 
important areas of research in human genetics. McKenzie 

GN 505A,B,C Genetics I. Preq.: GN All. 1-U F. Principles presented as a series of 
five-week minicourses: GN 505A, molecular genetics; GN 505B, biochemical genetics; GN 
505C, developmental genetics. The laboratory, GN 505D, involves experimental techniques 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 183 

in genetics and extends throughout the sennester. Majors and minors must enroll for the 
entire course. Others may enroll for specific minicourses and attend the first lecture of 
semester for schedule. Graduate Staff 

GN506A,B,C GeneticsII.Preq.:GNJ^ll;Coreq.:ST511. 1-3 S. Principles presented as a 
series of five-week minicourses: GN 506A, population genetics; GN 506B, quantitative 
genetics; GN 506C. cytogenetics. Majors and minors must enroll for the entire series. 
Others may enroll for specific minicourses and attend the first lecture of the semester for 
schedule. Graduate Staff 

GN (ANS) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement. 3(3-0) S. (See animal science.) 

GN (PC) 520 Poultry Breeding. 3(2-2) S. (See poultry science.) 

GN (ZO) 540 Evolution. Preq.: Nine credits in biological sciences. 3(3-0) S. The nature of 
organic evolution is explored by examining the types of evidence that allow reconstruction 
of the history of life on earth as well as experimental and descriptive evidence regarding the 
mechanisms of genetic change in populations. Graduate Staff 

GN (CS, HS) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science.) 

GN (CS) 545 Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See crop 
science.) 

GN (BO, CS, HS) 547 Cell and Tissue Techniques in Plant Breeding. 3(l-J^) F. Alt. yrs. 
(See crop science.) 

GN 555 Population Genetics. Preqs.: GN 506A, MA 102. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Theoretical 
population genetics and its relationship to natural and experimental populations. Topics 
include: single locus and multilocus systems, history of a gene in a population, diffusion 
approximations, suitability of models to natural and experimental populations. Emigh 

GN (MB) 558 Prokaryotic Molecular Genetics. 3(3-0) S. (See microbiology.) 

GN 560 Molecular Genetics. Preqs.: GN All; BCH U51. 3(3-0) F. A discussion of the 
structure and function of the genetic material at a molecular level. Both prokaryotic and 
eukaryotic systems considered. The aim will be to describe genetics in terms of chemical 
principles. Spiker 

GN (BCH) 561 Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. Preqs.: BCHU51 or 551, GN Ull 
or 505, MB IfOl or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Astudyof the development of the fields of biochemi- 
cal and microbial genetics, emphasizing both techniques and concepts currently used in 
molecular research. Includes lectures and discussions of current research publications. 

Armstrong 

GN 567 Molecular Cytogenetics. Preq.: GN 505 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. A 
molecular-genetic analysis of the structure function and evolution of eukaryotic genomes. 
Current methodology and approaches discussed, including DNA sequence analysis, 
chromosomal proteins, specific repeated genes, transposable elements in eukaryotic sys- 
tems, structure and evolution of organelle genomes and use of recombinant DNA tech- 
niques in studies of chromosome structure. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

GN (ANS) 603 Population Genetics in Animal Improvement. 3(3-0) F. (See animal 
science.) 

GN (FOR) 611 Forest Genetics. 3(3-0) S. (See forestry.) 



184 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

GN (FOR) 612 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Genetics. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See 
forestry.) 

GN (CS, HS) 615 Quantitative Genetics in Plant Breeding. 1(1-0) S. Ait. yrs. (See crop 
science.) 

GN (CS, HS) 616 Breeding Methods. 2(2-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See crop science.) 

GN (CS, HS) 617 Nonconventional Plant Breeding. 1(1-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See crop 
science.) 

GN (CS, HS, PP) 618 Breeding for Pest Resistance. 2(2-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See crop 
science.) 

GN (ST) 626 Statistical Concepts in Genetics. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See statistics.) 

GN 641 Colloquium in Genetics. Preqs.: Grad. standing; CI. 2(2-0) F,S. Informal group 
discussion of prepared topics assigned by the instructor. Graduate Staff 

GN 650 Developmental Genetics. Preq.: GN 505. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The action and 
regulation of genes and gene-products in development and differentiation. Examples taken 
from microorganisms, plants and animals. Emphasis placed on molecular and biochemical 
aspects of mechanisms controlling gene expression in eukaryotic cell differentiation. 

Curtis 

GN 651 Somatic Cell Genetics. Preqs.: GN 505; BCH 1^51. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Discussion of 
the use of non-germ line cells for the genetic analysis of eukaryotic organisms. Plant, 
animal and fungal systems considered. Topics include: mutagenesis, selection, cell fusion, 
parasexual cycles, cloning, genetic engineering and regeneration of whole organisms. 

Spiker 

GN (BCH) 658 Nucleic Acids: Structure and Function. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See 
biochemistry.) 

GN (MB) 660 Experimental Microbial Genetics. U(2-6) S. (See microbiology.) 

GN 666 Laboratory in Molecular Genetics. Preqs.: GN 505 or equivalent and CI. M2-6) 
S. Alt. yrs. A laboratory course in modern techniques of molecular genetics for advanced 
students. Techniques include in situ hybridization, recombinant DNA methodology, and 
DNA sequencing. Enrollment limited to 12 students. Applications for a place in the course 
may be obtained from the instructor. Conkling 

GN 691 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

GN 695 Special Problems in Genetics. Preqs.: Advanced grad. standing, CI. 1-3 F,S. 
Special topics designed for additional experience and research training. Graduate Staff 

GN 699 Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing, permission of adviser. Credits Arranged. 
Original research related to the student's thesis problem. A maximum of six credits for the 
master's degree; by arrangement for the doctorate. Graduate Staff 

Graduate School Registrations (GR) 

For information regarding these registrations, see Special Registration and 
Fees. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 185 

History 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor A. J. DeGrand, Head 

Assistant Professor J. E. Crisp, Assistant Head 

Professor W. C. Harris, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: 3 . R. Banker, B. F. Beers, W. H. Beezley, C. H. Carlton, M. S. Downs, 
J. P. Hobbs. D. E. King, A. J. LaVopa, L. 0. McMurry, J. M. Riddle, R. H. Sack, 
E. D. Sylla, B. W. Wishy; Adjunct Professor: R. L. Greaves; Professors Emeriti: 
M. L. Brown Jr., R. W. Greenlaw, M. E. Wheeler; Associate Professors: J. A. 
Mulholland, G. D. Newby, G. W. O'Brien, J. K. Ocko, S. T. Parker, R. W. Slatta, 
J. D. Smith, G. D. Surh, K. P. Viekery, K. S. Vincent; Associate Professor 
Emeritus: R. N. Elliott; Assistant Professors: D. P. Gilmartin, W. A. Jackson 
III, W. C. Kimler, K. P. Luria, S. L. Spencer; Adjunct Assistant Prof essors: W. 
S.Price Jr., H.K.Steen 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Assistant Professor: J. C. Bonham 

The history department offers programs leading to the Master of Arts degree 
in history and Master of Arts degree in archival management. Although no 
specific courses are stipulated for admission to the programs, preference will be 
given to those students with at least 18 hours in history and a total of 30 hours in 
the social sciences. Candidates are expected to have taken the aptitude portion of 
the Graduate Record Examination, or if admitted provisionally, must do so 
before the end of their first semester. Candidates are requested to include brief 
statements of their objectives in entering the programs along with their 
applications. 

Normally a degree candidate for a Master of Arts in history will concentrate 
work in either European or American history with the required total of 30 hours 
being made up of nine to twelve hours of course work at the 500 level or above; six 
hours of research seminar (600 level); up to six hours of research and preparation 
of thesis (600 level); and six to nine hours of course work in a field related to the 
candidate's area of concentration (500 or 600 level). Under special circumstances 
a candidate may be permitted to include a 400-level course (see undergraduate 
catalog for descriptions) in his or her program if it has particular relevance to 
one's program objectives. Social studies teachers may be awarded G certification 
through completion of a degree with a major in history and a minor in education. 

The Master of Arts in archival management requires thirty-six hours of 
courses, including two three-hour practicums in lieu of the thesis. Half of the 
course hours fall in historical studies, the rest in archival management. One 
practicum places the student under the direct supervision of the State Archivist 
of North Carolina. Students may select the other areas of interest— college 



186 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

archives, history sites administration, museology, historical preservation or 
others. 

One fellowship, one ^aduate scholarship and three teaching assistantships are 
now offered. Inquiry should be addressed to the graduate administrator. 

North Carol ina State University is a member of the Folger Institute of Renais- 
sance and Eighteenth-Century Studies, a unique collaborative enterprise spon- 
sored by the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., and twenty 
universities in the Middle Atlantic region. Each year the Institute offers an 
interdisciplinary program in the humanities — seminars, workshops, symposia, 
colloquia and lectures. Admission is open to faculty and students of North Caro- 
lina State University, and a limited number of fellowships are available through 
the Campus Folger Institute Committee. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NOTE: Prerequisite: (500 level) Six hours of advanced history or equivalent. 

HI 509 The High Middle Ages. Credit in both HI U09 and HI 509 is not allowed. 3(3-0). 
An analysis of various aspects of medieval culture for the period 936-1250. Selected topics 
examined using source readings in such subjects as the revival of the Roman Empire, 
monastic and papal reform, the rise of universities, the evolution of representative bodies, 
the Gothic style, troubadour and goliardic poetry, scholasticism and the revival of Roman 
law. Riddle 

HI 515 Revolutionary Europe. CreditinbothHHlS andHI 515 is not allowed. 3(3-0). A 
broadly based analysis of Europe's first revolutionary era. Topics covered are the Enlight- 
enment and its impact, the causes and character of the Revolution in France and the impact 
of these events in France and Europe. Luria 

HI 516 European Society and Culture in the Eighteenth Century. Credit in both HI 
Jtl9 and HI 519 is not allowed. 3(3-0). Study of social traditions and change in Western 
Europe in the 18th century. Population growth and its effects, changes in lower and middle 
class family life, evolution of experience and perception of poverty, types of popular protest. 

LaVopa 

HI 518 FaiScisminGermainy andlialy, 1919-45. Crediti7ibothHI J^18 andHI 518isnot 
alloived. 3(3-0). Hitler and Mussolini: two aspects of European fascism. DeGrand 

HI 519 Modern European Imperialism. Credit in both HI Jfl9 and HI 519 is not 
allov^ed. 3(3-0). Historical background of European Colonialism. Its influence on modern 
independence movements and major power foreign policy. Third World concept in interna- 
tional relations. Gilmartin 

HI 520 European Diplomatic History. Credit in both HI i20 and HI 520 is not allowed. 
3(3-0). Survey of major issues and events in European international relations; Congress of 
Vienna. 1815. to defeat of Axis powers and origins of Cold War in 1945. DeGrand 

HI 525 Tudor and Stuart England. Credit in both HI U25 and HI 525 is not allowed. 
3(3-0). British history from the Reformation to the Civil War. Primary emphasis on certain 
key developments in social, political and economic life, such as the development of a new 
concept of kingship, the growing independence of Parliament, the search for religious 
uniformity and the changing status of the aristocracy and gentry. Graduate Staff 

HI 528 England in the Age of the American Revolution. 3(3-0). An intensive study of 
English political, religious, economic, social and imperial ideas and institutions between 
1 763 and 1 783 w i th special emphasis on how these affected and were affected by the War of 
the American Revolution. ' Downs 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 187 

HI 539 The Russian Revolution. Credit in both HI439 and HI 539 is not allowed. 3(3-0). 
The Russian Revolution as a connected episode, from the late Imperial period through the 
degeneration of Bolshevism under Stalin; the origins of revolutionary politics and the 
causes of the collapse of Tsarist autocracy; the dynamics of revolutionary events of 1917- 
1921; economic recovery and cultural pluralism of the 1920s; political repression and 
industrialization of the 1930s. Surh 

HI 542 The United States: Revolution to Constitution. Credit in both HIAU2 and HI 5-1^2 
is tiot allowed. 3(3-0). The conflict with Great Britain after 1763 leading to the declaring of 
independence; the war for American independence; the political, social and ideological 
problems in establishing the government of the new nation. Graduate Staff 

HI 546 Civil War and Reconstruction. Credit in both HlHd and HI 51t6 is not allowed. 
3(3-0). A study of the period of sectional strife, war and reconstruction, including a close 
examination of the sectional polarization of the 1850s, the impact of the war on both 
northern and southern societies and the trauma of reconstructing the Union. Harris 

HI 554 History of U. S. Foreign Relations, 1900-Present. Credit in bothHHSU and HI 
55Jf is not allowed. 3(3-0). American diplomatic history since 1900: the expansion of 
American economic and cultural relations; the evolution of the American foreign policy 
bureaucracy: and the historical forces and personalities that shaped American relations 
with other nations. Beers 

HI 555 History of the Civil Rights Movement. Preqs.: 6 hrs. of advanced HI; jr. stand- 
ing. 3(3-0). Credit for both HI U55 and HI 555 is not allowed. The "black revolution;" stages 
and leaders of the movement; successes and failures in the fight for desegregation, the vote 
and economic opportunity; impact of Civil Rights movement on the United States. 

Graduate Staff 

HI 556 American Heritage. Credit in both HI U56 and HI 556 is not allowed. 3(3-0). 
Development of American ideals since colonial times studied through the words of famous 
Americans and in the context of events like the American Revolution and the Great 
Depression. Stress on the conflicts, during important crises, between freedom and order, 
liberty and equality, free enterprise and social justice, religious truth and workaday 
morality, the nation and the world. Graduate Staff 

HI 561 Civilization of the Old South. Credit in both HI U61 and HI 561 is not allowed. 
3(3-0). The distinctive features of the Old South as part of the regional development of the 
United States. Colonial factors in the making of the South, development of the plantation 
system and slavery. Southern social order, intellectual and cultural life, economic devel- 
opment and rise of Southern nationalism. Crisp, Smith 

HI 562 Social History of the New South. Creditin both HH62 and HI 562 is not allowed. 
3(3-0). Analysis of southern society from the Civil War through the present, with an 
emphasis on social history methods, approaches and sources. Graduate Staff 

HI 565 The History of Urban Life in the U.S., 1607-1865. Credit in both HU65 and HI 
565 is not allowed. 3(3-0). The historical background of today's urban problems. King 

HI 566 The History of Urban Life in the U.S., 1865-Present. Credit in both HU66 and 
HI 566 is not allowed. 3(3-0). The historical background of today's urban problems. King 

HI 569 Latin American Revolutions in the Twentieth Century. Credit in both HI U69 
and HI 569 is not allowed. 3(3-0). The varieties of revolutionary changes in twentieth- 
century Latin American revolutions: Argentina, Bolivia, Peru, Cuba and Chile. 

Beezley, Slatta 

HI 576 Leadership in Modern Africa. Credit in both HI Jf76 ayxd HI 576 is not allowed. 
3(3-0). The conditions under which 20th century African leaders have obtained and exer- 
cised power. Case studies of prominent leaders, both radicals, reactionaries, democrats and 
tyrants, such as Nkrumah, Kenyatta, Nyerere, Amin, Cabral, Vorster and Senghor. 

Vickery 



188 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

HI 580 Scientific Revolution: 1300-1700. Credit in both HI U80 and HI 580 is not 
allowed. .i(.i-O). Factors behind dramatic scientific changes of the seventeenth century. Role 
of mathematics and experiment. Interaction of the new science with trends in philosophy, 
reilRion, alchemy, magic, medicine and with institutional educational, political, economic 
and technological factors. Sylla 

HI 58 1 History of Life Sciences. Credit in both HI J^Sl and HI 581 is not allowed. 3(3-0). 
Surveys the major ideas, methods, institutions and individuals that have contributed to the 
biological sciences from antiquity to modern times and examines the connections between 
the life sciences and other aspects of culture, including the physical sciences, religious 
belief, medical practice and agriculture. Students in the History of Life Sciences read 
original sources and historical monographs concerning those topics. Kimler 

HI 582 Darwinism in Science and Society. Preqs.: 6 krs. of advanced HI; jr. standing. 
3(3-0). Credit for both HI U82 and HI 582 is not allowed. Darwinism and its reception by the 
scientific community and the general public. Social impact of theories of evolution as 
expected in social Darwinism, eugenics, sociobiology and the relationship of science to 
ethics and religion. Graduate Staff 

HI 585 Principles and Practice of Applied History. Preqs.: Grad. standing; 6 hours of 
history or equivalent. Credit in both HH85 andHl585 is not allowed. 3(3-0). An introduction 
to applications of history to public life and to the conservation and presentation of historical 
materials, with particular attention to conservation problems generated by modern tech- 
nology. Topics include archives, records management, historical editing, muscology, his- 
torical preservation, special forms of presentation like historic sites and audiovisual tech- 
niques and computer applications. Smith 

HI 586 History and Principles of the Administration of Archives and Manuscripts. 

Credit in both HI Jt86 and HI 586 is not allowed. 3(3-0). Nature, importance and use of 
original manuscript resources; the history and evolution of written records and the institu- 
tions administering them; the principles and practices of archives administration. Olson 

HI 587 Application of Principles of Administration of Archives and Manuscripts. 

Preqs.: Six hours of advanced history and HI 586. Credit in both HI 1^87 and HI 587 is not 
allowed. 3(3-0). Internship training in the application of the principles and practices of 
archival management as developed in HI 586. Olson 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NOTE: Prerequisite: (600 level) Six hours of advanced history or equivalent. 

HI 601 Historiography and Historical Method. 3(3-0). A study of the major steps in the 
development of historical investigation; analysis of elements of historical research; discus- 
sion of methodology and archival materials used by the contemporary scholarly historian. 

Graduate Staff 

HI 602 Historical Writing. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0). Critical studies 
in the methods and practice of contemporary historical writing. Graduate Staff 

HI 685 Independent Study. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 1-6. Individualized 
study conducted under supervision of graduate faculty. Letter grades (ABCD/NC). Course 
of study, assigned readings, course projects or papers, and methods of evaluating work to be 
detailed in writing and approved by department head. Graduate Staff 

HI 688 Sonographic and Other Archival Materials. Preq.: HH85/585. 3(2-2). Intro- 
duction to archival materials. P^.xaminationof and practice in the storage and care of paper 
and books, prints, engravings and maps. Films, transparencies, negatives, magnetic tapes 
and phonorecords. Emphasis on preventive conservation. MulhoUand, Smith 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 189 

HI 689 Documentary Editing. Preq.: HH85/585. 3(3-0). An introduction to the field of 
documentary editing. Development of historical editing and the rules of literal, expanded 
and modern editorial method. Special documentary/papers projects. Crow, Smith 

HI 691 Practicum in Applied History. Preq.: HI 601, 602, 685. 1-6. Supervised intern- 
ship experience in an archival management and/or applied history. Graduate Staff 

HI 699 Research in History. Credits Arranged. 1-6. Individual research undergraduate 
thesis supervisor. Graduate Staff 

Horticultural Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. J. Monaco, Head 

Professor D. J. Werner, Graduate Administrator 

Professors:J. R. Ballington. F. A. Blazich, W. W. Collins, A. A. DeHertogh, R. A. 
Larson, J. W. Love, C. M. Mainland, C. H. Miller, P. V. Nelson. D. M. Pharr. J. 
C. Raulston, D. C. Sanders, W. A. Skroch, C. R. Unrath, T. C. Wehner, L. G. 
Wilson, E. Young; Professors Emeriti: W. E. Ballinger, F. D. Cochran, F. L. 
Haynes, J. M. Jenkins, T. R. Konsler, D. T. Pope; Associate Professors: T. E. 
Bilderback, S. M. Blankenship, P. R. Fantz, W. C. Fonteno III, R. G. Gardner, 
W. R. Henderson, L. E. Hinesley, W. E. Hooker, M. M. Peet, K. B. Perry, E. B. 
Poling; Adjuyict Associate Professor: P. S. Zorner; Associate Professors Emer- 
iti:T. F. Cannon, D. C. Zeiger; Assistant Professors: J. M. Davis, R. G. Goldy, S. 
L. Warren, Lecturer: M. E. E. Traer 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: D. E. Carroll Jr., R. J. Downs, R. H. Moll, R. L. Mott, T. J. Sheets; 
Professor Emeritus: R. Aycock 

Graduate study under the direction of the horticultural science faculty may 
lead to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Areas of study 
include plant physiology, plant breeding and genetics, post-harvest physiology, 
agricultural meteorology, plant nutrition, tissue culture, growth regulators and 
weed science. The Master of Agriculture, a professional degree, can be earned by 
substituting additional course work for research requirements of graduate 
study. 

Facilities for graduate studies on the Raleigh campus include a 30,000 square- 
foot greenhouse (21 sections, each with separately controlled light and tempera- 
ture); the University Phytotron (available for controlled environmental studies 
on horticultural crops); 19 well-equipped laboratories (chromatography, seed 
handling and storage, cytological/anatomical, radioisotope, tissue culture, post- 
harvest and nutritional studies). There are 14 controlled temperature storage 
rooms; an extensive collection of plant materials, both living (NCSU Arboretum) 
and preserved; and a variety of climates and soils from coast to mountains in 
North Carolina on 15 outlying research stations. 



190 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Opportunities for employment after graduate study include: teaching and 
research faculty positions in state and private universities; research and regula- 
tory positions with the Departments of Agriculture, both foreign and domestic; 
extension specialists and county agents; research, production and promotional 
work with agri-business concerned with production of horticultural crops or 
services to horticultural industries. 

Graduate teaching and research assistantships (commercial. Agricultural 
Foundation or N.C. Agricultural Research Service) for promising and qualified 
students are available. Students are encouraged to apply for assistantships at 
least six months prior to the anticipated enrollment date. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

HS 400 Residential Landscaping. Preqs.: DF 23U; HS 211, 212, SU2; HSl^ieorDN U33; 
SSC 200, DN 257, USO. Seniors in the landscape area of concentration given priority. 6(0-9) 
F,S. 

HS 41 1 Nursery Management. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200, jr. standing. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 416 Principles of Ornamental Planting Design. Preqs.: HS 211, HS 212, HS 3U2, 
SSC 200, DN 23U. 3(2-1,) F,S. 

HS 421 Tree Fruit Production. Preqs.: BS 100 or BO 200, SSC 200, HS 201. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 422 Small Fruit Production. Preqs.: BS 100 or BO 200, SSC 200, HS 201. 3(2-3) S. 
Alt. yrs. 

HS 431 Vegetable Production. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. M3-3) F. 

HS 440 Greenhouse Management. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 441 Floriculture L Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 442 Floriculture H. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) S. 

HS 471 Tree and Grounds Maintenance. Preqs.: BS 100 or BO 200; PP 315; SSC 200. 
U(3-3) S. 

HS 491 Horticultural Science Seminar. Preq.: Jr. standing in horticultural science. 
1(1-0) F. 

HS 495 Special Topics in Horticultural Science. 1-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HS (CS) 515 Weed Science Research Techniques. Preq.: CSJtH or equivalent. 1(0-2) F. 
Bioassay techniques for detection of herbicide residues in soils, chemical analytical (GLC, 
HFLC) techniques for identifying herbicide residues in soils and plants, procedures for 
studying adsorption and leaching in soils, procedures for measuring herbicide interference 
of photosynthesis and use of '■'C-labeled herbicides for following uptake, transport and 
metabolism of herbicides in plants. Graduate Staff 

HS (CS) 516 Weed Biology. Preq.: CSUU. 1(1-0) F. Weed seed development and disper- 
sal, seed dormancy, soil seed bank, seedling development, growth analysis, reproduction, 
community structure, population dynamics, species interactions, environmental effects on 
interactions and influence of man. Taught first 5 weeks of semester. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 191 

HS (CS) 517 Weed Management Systems. Preq.: CS UH or equivalent. 1(1-0) F. Weed 
management systems including integration of cultural, biological, mechanical and chemi- 
cal methods for vegetables, fruits, ornamentals, turf, small grains, corn, tobacco, cotton, 
peanuts, aquatic and non-cropland settings. Taught second 5 weeks of semester. 

Graduate Staff 

HS(CS)518 BioIogicalControlof Weeds. Pre9.;CSii.4 or e^wa/ew^. 1(1-0)F. Concepts 
and methods in the use of biological agents for control of weeds. Primary emphasis on weed 
biocontrol with insects and plant pathogens. Taught third 5 weeks of semester. 

Graduate Staff 

HS 531 Physiology of Landscape Plants. Preq.: BO A21 or CI. 3(2-3) S. A course 
designed to cover relationships of plants to landscape environments. Study of plant func- 
tion, basic climatology and plant physiological principles involved in the selection, utiliza- 
tion and maintenance of physical landscape environments in exterior and interior orna- 
mental landscape plantings. Raulston 

HS 532 Vegetable Crop Physiology. Preqs.:B0U21, HSU31, SSC3U1. 2(2-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Physiological aspects of field and greenhouse vegetable production: germination, photo- 
period, nutrition, growth regulations, fruit quality, physiological disorders, source-sink 
interactions, environmental physiology and physiological aspects of plant protection. 
Emphasis on current areas of research and the physiological implications of new produc- 
tion techniques. Peet 

HS 534 Vegetable Crops Practicum. Preq.: HS A31. 3(1-6) S. Alt. yrs. Field techniques 
for research on vegetable production problems. Eleven all-day field trips (two overnight) 
required during the period May-August. Peet 

HS (CS, GN) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science.) 

HS (BO, CS, GN) 547 Cell and Tissue Techniques in Plant Breeding. 3(l-J^) F. Alt. yrs. 
(See crop science.) 

HS (FS) 562 Postharvest Physiology. Preq.: BO A21. 3(3-0) S. A study of chemical and 
physiological changes that occur during handling, transportation and storage which affect 
the quality of horticultural crops. Consideration given to preharvest and postharvest 
conditions which influence these changes. Blankenship 

HS 595 Special Topics in Horticultural Science. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Investigation 
of special theoretical problems at the 500 level in horticultural science not related to a thesis 
problem; new 500-level courses during the developmental phase. Graduate Staff 

HS 599 Research Principles. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged, Maximum 6. Investigation of 
a problem in horticulture under the direction of the instructor. The students obtain practice 
in experimental techniques and procedures, critical review of literature and scientific 
writing. The problem may last one or two semesters. Credits determined by the nature of 
the problem, not to exceed a total of three hours for any one problem. A written report and 
final oral exam required for completion of course. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

HS 601 Carbohydrate Metabolism and Transport. Preq.: BO U21. 1(1-0) F. Historical 
and current research related to the regulation of aspects of carbohydrate metabolism 
important to plant grov^h, yield and quality. Taught first five weeks of semester. 

Graduate Staff 

HS 602 Environmental Stress Physiology. Preq.: BO ^21. 1(1-0) F. Nature of environ- 
mental stresses which plants encounter such as chilling, freeze, heat, drought, excess 
water, salt, ion and radiation, and physiology of plant responses and resistance mecha- 
nisms. Taught second five weeks of semester. Graduate Staff 



192 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

HS603 Breeding Asexually Propagated Crops. Pre^./CS^i.^ 1(1-0) F. Principles and 
problems associated with breeding clonally propagated crops and the techniques used in 
overcoming these problems. Taught third five weeks of semester. Graduate Staff 

HS 604 Plant Nomenclature. Preq.: BO U21. 1(1-0) S. A practical foundation in plant 
nomenclature and nomenclatural references. Emphasis on the evolution of the interna- 
tional rules for naming plant taxa and their application to both wild and cultivated plants. 
Nomenclatural applications used in patents, cultivar releases and journal articles. Taught 
first five weeks of semester. Graduate Staff 

HS605 Physiology of Flowering. Preg...BO 427. 1(1-0) S. Examination of the physiolog- 
ical basis of flowering in plants such as: floral initiation, transition to reproductive growth; 
floral development; plant response to light, temperature, nutrition, water supply; plant 
age; chemical growth regulation and in vitro flowering. Taught second five weeks of 
semester. Graduate Staff 

HS 606 Fruit Development and Postharvest Physiology. Preq.: BO 421. 1(1-0) S. 
Theories of plant senescence, both physiological and biochemical, and postharvest changes 
in all types of plant parts. Emphasis on the physiological principles which underlie current 
postharvest handling and storage techniques. Includes a study of fruit development from 
fruit set to senescence. Taught third five weeks of semester. Graduate Staff 

HS (CS, SSC) 614 Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science.) 

HS (CS, GN) 615 Quantitative Genetics in Plant Breeding. 1(1-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See crop 
science.) 

HS (CS, GN) 616 Breeding Methods. 2(2-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See crop science.) 

HS (CS, GN) 617 Nonconventional Plant Breeding. 1(1-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See crop 
science.) 

HS (CS, GN, PP) 618 Breeding for Pest Resistance. 2(2-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See crop 
science.) 

HS 621 Methods and Evaluation of Horticultural Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. 
3(3-0) F. Study of necessary elements for a career in horticultural research including: 
background and philosophy of scientific research; survey of horticultural research history 
and current status; research design and evaluation; photographic techniques; technical 
writing including project proposals, administrative reports and publications; office and 
personnel management. Raulston 

HS 622 Mineral Nutrition in Plants. Preqs.: BO 551, 552. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. A compre- 
hensive study of the functional roles of nutrients essential to plant growth, their interrela- 
tionships and their mode of influence on quality indices of crops. Consideration of the 
complexity of mineral nutrition experimentation and evaluation of results. A detailed look 
at the establishment and application of foliar analysis, foliar fertilization and slow-release 
fertilizers. A general view of the nutrient uptake process in plants. Nelson 

HS 691 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Required of all graduate students 
with a minor in horticultural science. Optional for all horticultural science graduate 
students. Presentation of scientific articles and special lectures. Students required to 
present one or more papers. Graduate Staff 

HS 695 Graduate Topics in Horticultural Science. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S,Su7n. Investiga- 
tion of theoretical problems at the 600 level in horticultural science not related to a thesis 
problem: new 600-level courses during the development phase. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 193 

HS 699 Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing in HS, consent of advisory committee chairman. 
Credits Arranged. A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master of Science 
degree; no limitation on credits in doctoral program. Original research on specific prob- 
lems in fruit, vegetable and ornamental crops. Graduate Staff 

Industrial and Technical Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see industrial and 
technical education in the education section. 

Industrial Arts Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and program information, see industrial arts 
education in the education section. 



Industrial Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. J. Hodgson, Head 

Professor R. G. Pearson, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: M. A. Ayoub, R. H. Bernhard, J. R. Canada, S. E. Elmaghraby, S.-C. 
Fang, H. L. W. Nuttle, A. L. Prak, W. A. Smith Jr.; Professors Emeriti: R. E. 
Alvarez, C. A. Anderson, R. W. Llewellyn; Associate Professors: P. J. O'Grady, 
R. E. Young; Adjunct Associate Professors: D. C. Antonelli, M. G. Joost; Asso- 
ciate Professor Emeritus: J. J. Harder; Assistant Professors: D. W. Aldrich, J. 
F. Antin, D. P. Bischak, C. T. Culbreth Jr., Y. Fathi, R. E. King, E. T. Sanii; 
Visiting Assistant Professor: J. Trevino; Adjunct Assistant Professors: B. H. 
Beith, C. B. Oldham, J. Taheri 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Associate Professors: W. J. Rasdorf, R. D. Rodman; Assistant Professor: N. M. 
Bengtson 

Industrial engineering is concerned with solutions to problems relating to 
design and control of organizational systems, such as industrial and commercial 
corporations, government agencies, and other institutions which provide goods 
or services for public consumption. Interests include the management of opera- 
tions, planning and scheduling, manufacturing engineering, allocation of re- 
sources, dynamic system design, man-machine relationships, and occupational 
safety and health. 

The department offers the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philo- 
sophy. Principal areas of specialization include manufacturing systems, produc- 
tion systems, information systems, economic decision analysis, and ergonomics. 



194 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Typical minors are taken in statistics, economics and business, computer science, 
artificial intelligence, psychology, operations research, and other engineering 
disciplines. 

The M.S. degree may be taken either with or without a thesis. The thesis work 
for the M.S. degree may account for as many as six semester hours. For the 
non-thesis option a formal written report, based upon scholarly project work, is 
required. A departmental brochure which details the orientation and require- 
ments for all degrees is available. No foreign language is required at the master's 
level, and a foreign language is optional with the student's advisory committee at 
the doctoral level. 

The University provides access to an outstanding mainframe computer facility 
at the Triangle Universities Computing Center (TUCC) through conveniently 
located computer terminals. In addition, the department supports a VAX 1 1/750 
and a MICRO VAX II, both of which are networked campus and nationwide. 
Other resources include a wide range of microcomputer systems, among which 
are several INTEL 310 supermicrocomputers and Tektronics graphic terminals. 
The manufacturing laboratory has a representative sample of basic machine 
tools and numerical control equipment. A number of robots exist for part han- 
dling and assembly work research. Modern material handling equipment, such 
as computer-controlled carousels and conveyors, and a broad range of program- 
mable controllers are part of the manufacturing cells for research in decision 
support systems for flexible assembly operations and robotics issues. Facilities 
for ergonomics research are also excellent for the study of environmental factors, 
biomechanics, work physiology and human performance assessment. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

IE 401 Stochastic Models in Industrial En^neering. Preq.: An introductory course in 
probability and/ or math statistics. 3(3-0) F,S. 

IE (CSC) 441 Introduction to Simulation. Preqs.: MA 202, ST 372, proficiency in a 
programming language 3(3-0) F,S. 

IE 443 Quality Control. Preq.: ST 361. 3(2-2) F,S,Sum. 

IE 452 Ergonomics. Coreq.: IE 352. 3(2-2) F,S. 

IE 453 Facilities Design. Preqs.: IE 351, 352. 3(2-2) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IE (MA, OR) 505 Linear Programming. Preq.: MA W5. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of mathem- 
atical methods applied to problems of planning. Linear programming covered in detail. 
This course intended for those who desire to study this subject in depth and detail. It 
provides a rigorous and complete development of the theoretical and computational aspects 
of this technique as well as a discussion of a number of applications. Fathi, Peterson 

IE (OR) 509 Dynamic Programming. Preqs.: MA U05, STU21. 3(3-0) S. An introduction 
to the theory and computational aspects of dynamic programming and its application to 
sequential decision problems. Elmaghraby 

IE 511 Capital Investment Economic Analysis. Preqs.: IE 311, ST 371. 3(3-0) F. Analy- 
sis of economic merits of alternatives including interest and income tax considerations. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 195 

Risk and sensitivity exploration techniques. Introduction to analytical techniques for mul- 
tiple objectives or criteria. Use of mathematical programming and computers for capital 
budgeting. Bernhard, Canada 

IE 512 Bayesian Decision Analysis for Engineers and Ma.na.gers. Preq.: ST 371 or ST 
i21. 3(3-0) F. The Bayesian approach to decision making, with numerous applications in 
engineering and business. Expected value maximization, decision trees, Bayes' theorem, 
value of information, sequential procedures and optimal strategies. Axiomatic utility 
theory and controversies, utility of money, theoretical and empirical determination of 
utility functions and relationship to mean-variance analysis. Brief introduction to multi- 
attribute problems, time streams and group decisions. Bernhard, Canada 

IE 515 Advanced Manufacturing Processes. Preqs.: IE 351 and ECE 331 or equival- 
ent. 3(3-0) F. The course examines manufacturing processes which involve chemical, elec- 
trochemical, electrical, thermo-electric and non-conventional mechanical energy modes. 
Each process investigated as to its underlying theory, state-of-the-art technology, interac- 
tion with the workpiece material, geometric capability and economics. O'Grady, Sanii 

IE 516 CAM I: A Systemic Approach to Computer- Aided Manufacturing. Preq.: IE 
351. 3(3-0) F. General principles of CAD/CAM integration. Elements of computer graph- 
ics. Engineering data base. Computer Process Control. Group Technology concepts and 
applications. Flexible manufacturing systems. Culbreth, O'Grady, Sanii 

IE 517 CAM II: Software Applications in Computer-Aided Manufacturing. Preqs.: 
IE 516. 3(3-0) S. Computer techniques for controlling machine tool motions. Extensive 
application of Numerical Control Programmingusing the APT language. Computer Aided 
Process Planning through the CAPP system. Theory and applications of Programmable 
Controllers for Process Control. Various application software for manufacturing use. 

O'Grady, Sanii 

IE 518 Manufacturing Operations Management. Preqs.: MA 202 or MA 212; ST(EB) 
350 or ST 372. 3(3-0) F. Not for IE majors. Concepts, problems and procedures for the 
management of manufacturing operations. Emphasis on forecasting, capacity planning, 
material requirements planning, scheduling, inventory control and related computer- 
based control systems. Hodgson, King, Nuttle 

IE (MAE) 520 Industrial Robotics. Preqs.: IE 351; MA 301 or MA 303. 3(3-0) F. 
Development, structure, specifications and capabilities of industrial robots. Robot control 
fundamentals. Kinematics of manipulators. Applications, selection, economics and imple- 
mentation of robotic systems. Safety considerations, end-of-arm tooling and design of 
robotic workplace. Acutators, sensors including vision and tactile sensory systems for 
robots. Sanii 

IE 521 Management Decision and Control Systems. Preqs.: IE A21, CSC i21 or equi- 
valent. 3(3-0) S. Planning and development of comprehensive computer-based information 
systems to support management decisions. Formal systems concepts; management infor- 
mation requirements. Management science and organizational behavior influences. Data 
bases and advanced system techniques and concepts. System evaluation and cost effec- 
tiveness. Smith 

IE 523 Production Planning, Scheduling and Inventory Control. Preqs.: OR 501 and 
ST 515 or equivalents. 3(3-0) S. An analysis of Production-Inventory systems. Discussion of 
commonly used planning and scheduling techniques. Introduction to the use of math 
modeling for solution of planning and scheduling problems. Interface with quality control 
and information systems. Hodgson, King, Nuttle 

IE 525 Organizational Planning and Control. Preq.: Three hrs. in operations manage- 
ment (such as EB 325, IE 308). 3(3-0) F. Organization theory and systems approaches to 
administrative functions. Human and social influences of management systems for plan- 



196 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ning and control of activity. Policy, structure and procedure related to industrial engineer- 
ing activities. Effects of automation. Smith 

IE (PSY) 540 Human Factors in Systems Design. Preq.: IE 452 orPSYSW; Coreq.: ST 
507 or 515.3(3-0) F. Introduction to the systems development cycle, Man-machine function 
allocation, design standards, display and control systems, workspace layout, the personnel 
sub-system concept, anthropometry and maintainability design. Antin, Pearson 

IE 541 Systems Safety Engineering. Preqs.: IE 452, ST 371. 3(3-0) S. Problems in 
occupational safety and health; OSH A standards; preventive aspects involving product and 
work design and personnel selection. Consideration of the methods used in accident-injury 
study, including field investigation, experimental engineering and biomedical research, 
and statistical and epidemiological studies. Managerial aspects of safety accountability. 
Product liability and forensics. Pearson 

IE 542 Physiological Criteria in Work Measurement. Preq.: Grad. status. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Emphasis placed on basic endocrine and autonomic nervous system anatomy and 
physiology; measures reflecting sympathetic nervous system activity; concepts applicable 
to work measurement studies including a discussion of arousal theory and the concept of 
autonomic balance; and survey of current literature on equipment design and use. 

Ayoub 

IE 544 Occupational Biomechanics. Preq.: Grad. standing in engineering. 3(2-2) F. Alt. 
yrs. General concepts and techniques of understanding the anatomical and physiological 
bases of human motion. Characteristics and limitations of human motor capabilities, body 
mechanics and use of biomedical instrumentation for monitoring and quantifying human 
p(!rformance. Applications of biomechanics in work, industry, rehabilitation, sports, space 
research and safety are also considered. Ayoub 

IE (PSY) 545 Human Performance. Preqs.: Grad. standing; ST 507 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
S. Alt. yrs. Fundamentals of human perceptual and motor abilities basic to skilled operator 
performance. Theoretical models of man as an operator. The human as an information 
processing mechanism. Motor skills learning, performance decrement and information 
feedback. Channel capacity, stress, fatigue, arousal theory. Attention, time-sharing and 
workload. Sustained performance, vigilance, monitoring, search, inspection and tracking. 
Circadian rhythms; sleep loss; shiftwork. Pearson 

IE 547 Reliability Engineering. Preq.: ST 515 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An 
introduction to basic concepts of reliability engineering. Includes application of probability 
and statistics to estimate reliability of industrial systems; development of reliability mea- 
sures; analysis of static and dynamic reliability models; development and analysis of fault 
trees; analysis of Markovian and non-Markovian models; and optimization of reliability 
models. Fathi, King 

IE 548 Quality Engineering. Preqs.: OR 501, ST 515. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An introduction 
to basic concepts of quality engineering. Topics include statistical process control (SPC) 
methods, acceptance sampling techniques, concept of parameter design and statistical as 
well as analytical techniques for its implementation, tolerance analysis and design, compo- 
nents of cost of poor quality and an introduction to quality management. Fathi 

IE 553 Material Handling Systems. Preq.: IE 453. 3(3-0) S. Analysis, design, evaluation 
and implementation of material handling systems. Principles, functions, equipment con- 
cepts and traditional approaches of material handling. Impact of facilities design on 
material handling and application of quantitative techniques to material handling systems 
design. Description of factors and approaches to material handling management and the 
criticality of properly designed and operated material flow systems. Trevino 

IE 556 Industrial Logistics. Preq.: IE 453. 3(3-0) F. Materials management, materials 
flow and physical distribution. Management of activities required to move raw materials, 
parts and finished inventory from vendors, within an enterprise and to customers. This 
course covers the design and operation of effective industrial logistics systems. Trevino 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 197 

IE (OR) 561 Queues and Stochastic Service Systems. Preq.: MA U21. 3(3-0) F. General 
concepts of stochastic processes introduced. Poisson processes, Markov processes and 
renewal theory presented. These then used in the analysis of queues, starting with a 
completely memoryless queue to one with general parameters. Applications to many 
engineering problems considered. King, Perros, Stewart 

IE (CSC, ECE, OR) 562 Computer Simulation Techniques. 3(3-0) F. (See computer 
studies.) 

IE (CSC, ECE) 575 Voice Input/Output Communication Systems. Preqs.: MA 202 and 
IE 307 or CSC 312. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to the physical, linguistic and computational 
principles that underlie speech synthesis and speech recognition. Human factors of speech 
I/O. Advantages and disadvantages of implementing voice applications. Hands-on use of 
voice I/O equipment through class projects. Case studies of current applications of speech 
I/O technology. Rodman 

IE (MA, OR) 586 Network Flows. Preq.: IE (OR, MA) 505 or equivalent. 3(2-2) S. Alt. 
yrs. This course studies problems of flows in networks. These problems include the deter- 
mination of the shortest chain, maximal flow and minimal cost flow in networks. The 
relationship between network flows and linear programming developed as well as prob- 
lems with nonlinear cost functions, multicommodity flows and the problem of network 
synthesis. Elmaghraby, Fathi 

IE 589 Special Topics in Industrial Engineering. Preqs.: Grad. orsr. standing and CI. 
l-U. Exploration of emerging topics of interest to faculty and students. Generally used for 
the first offering of a new course, using conventional lecture format. Sometimes used for 
directed readings, problem sets and reports as required. Graduate Staff 

IE 591 Project Work. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F,S,Suw.. Investigation and report on 
assigned problems requiring application of industrial engineering techniques. 

Graduate Staff 

IE (PSY) 593 Area Seminar in Ergonomics. 1(0-2) F. (See psychology.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

IE 61 1 The Design of Production Systems. Preqs.: IE 523, OR 501. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
The structure and operation of production planning, scheduling and control systems; 
emphasis on system structure, capacity planning, master production scheduling and shop 
loading; investigation of current trends in the field. Elmaghraby 

IE 616 Computer Integration of Manufacturing Systems. Preqs.: IE 516, IE 517. 
3(3-0) F. In-depth study of computer integration of manufacturing systems. CIM elements 
(CAD, CAPP, CNC, industrial robotics), manufacturing control, communication and net- 
working, interfacing, database design, material handling and computer hardware require- 
ments in automated manufacturing systems. Emphasis on the integration of the compo- 
nents involved in computerized manufacturing environments. 

Culbreth, O'Grady, Sanii 

IE 621 Advanced Problems in Management Systems Engineering. Preq.: CI. l-k S. 
Coverage of advanced techniques, current research and contemporary problems in analy- 
sis, design and operation of management systems. Varied topics cover aspects of economic 
decision analysis, cost effectiveness, information flow, system performance evaluation and 
modern organization concepts. Bernhard, Canada, Smith 

IE 622 Inventory Control Methods II. Preq.: IE 523. 3(3-0) F. A continuation of IE 523; 
stochastic inventory systems of lot sized-reorder type; periodic review and single period 
models. Application of dynamic programming theory to deterministic and stochastic cases. 

Hodgson, King, Nuttle 



198 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

IE 631 Multi-attribute Decision Analysis. Preqs.: IE 511 or IE 512; OR 501 or OR 505. 
3(3-0) S. Specification of attributes/criteria/objectives for complex decisions. Determina- 
tion of alternatives, attribute weights and decision-making process. Graphical and weight- 
ed evaluation techniques. Multi-attribute utility, multi-objective/goal programming and 
analytic hierarchy process methodologies. Computer applications and case studies. 

Canada 

IE (PSY) 640 Skilled Operator Performance. Preqs.: PSY 5U5, ST 507, or ST 515. 
3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Theories of the human operators are considered with regard to the 
classical problems of monitoring, vigilance and tracking. Factors such as biological 
rhythm, sleep loss, sensory restriction, environmental stress and time-sharing considered 
as they interact with and determine overall systems efficiency. Antin, Pearson 

IE 641 Environmental Factors and Human Performance. Preqs.: IE (PSY) 5U0 and 
IE 5U2 or other equivalent. 3(S-0) S. Alt. yrs. Study of major problem areas, methodology, 
theory and experimental work in biotechnology; interaction among engineering, biological 
and behavioral factors in design for safety and survival; physiology and biomechanics of 
acceleration, deceleration and pressure altitude; consideration of operator effectiveness in 
submarine, extra-terrestrial, arctic and desert environments; techniques in evaluation of 
crash dynamics and pathology; closed-ecological systems. Pearson 

IE 646 Human Factors in Visual Display Systems. Preq.: IE (PSY) 51^0. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Electronic visual display systems; integration of photometry, vision and image quality 
metrics with human factors design concepts associated with standard and advanced dis- 
play technology options (e.g., CRT, flat panels and virtual image displays); applications and 
research issues. Graduate Staff 

IE 651 Special Studies in Industrial Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits 
Arranged. The purpose of this course is to allow individual students or small groups of 
students to undertake studies of special areas in industrial engineering which fit into their 
particular program and which may not be covered by an existing industrial engineering 
graduate level course. Problems may require individual research and initiative in the 
application of industrial engineering training to new areas or fields. Graduate Staff 

IE (CSCOR) 662 Stochastic Simulation Design and Analysis. Preqs.: CSE (CSC, 
ECE, IE, OR) 562 and ST 516. 3(3-0) S. Advanced topics in stochastic system simulation 
covered, including random variate generation, output estimation for stationary and nonsta- 
tionary models, performance optimization techniques, variance reduction approaches. 
Students apply these techniques to actual simulations. A paper written on a current 
research topic required. Bengston, Perros, 

IE (CSC, ECE) 675 Advanced in Voice Input/Output Communications Systems. 

Preq.: IE (CSC, CSE, ECE) 575. 3(2-3) S. Selected topics from the current literature in 
voice input/output research, technology and applications. Each student must carry out a 
significant experiment or project. Rodman 

IE (OR. MA) 692 Special Topics in Mathematical Programming. Preq.: IE (MA, OR) 
505. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. The study of special advanced topics in the area of mathematical 
programming. New techniques and current research in this area discussed. The faculty 
responsible for this course select the areas to be covered during the semester according to 
their preference and interest. This course not necessarily taught by an individual faculty 
member but can, on occasion, be a joint effort of several faculty members from this 
university as well as visiting faculty from other institutions. To date, a course of Theory of 
Networks and another on Integer Programming have been offered under the umbrella of 
this course. It is anticipated that these two topics will be repeated in the future together 
with other topics. Graduate Staff 

IE 693 Seminar in Applied Ergonomics. Preq.'i.: IE (PSY) 5W, ST 515. 1(0-2) S. 
Discussion of contemporary issues involving the systems approach to accident prevention 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 199 

and injury control. History of safety research; federal health, industrial and military 
activities in safety, current centers of safety research and their activity. Ayoub, Pearson 

IE 694 Advanced Problems in Ergonomics. Preqs.: IE (PSY) 5W, ST 515. 3(3-0) F. 
Exploration in depth of a problem area of contemporary interest involving the man- 
machine-environment interface. Class discussion and analysis of research and theory, with 
special focus on the human factors aspects of systems design and operation. 

Antin, Ayoub, Pearson 

IE 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) S. Seminar discussion of industrial engineering problems for 
graduate students. Case analyses and reports. Graduate Staff 

IE 699 Industrial Engineering Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. 
F.S.Sum.. Graduate research in industrial engineering for thesis credit. Graduate Staff 

Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering 

Professor C. F. Zorov^ski, Director 

Approximately tw^enty faculty from six different departments serve as the 
graduate faculty for the IMSE degree program. A list of these participants is 
available from the IMSE Institute Office. 

The Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering program was estab- 
lished in 1984 to provide an interdisciplinary course of study in manufacturing 
systems at the graduate level. The program is administered through the Inte- 
grated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute, a multifaceted educa- 
tional, research and technology transfer organization within the College of Engi- 
neering. The objective of the academic program is education in the theory and 
practice of advanced design and manufacturing methods. Central to all aspects of 
the Institute's program is the integration of computer-aided techniques in the 
design of both product and process and in the control of manufacturing facilities. 
The development and application of this technology require a specially struc- 
tured academic and research program to produce graduates capable of bringing 
about the productivity and quality gains desired by industry. 

The academic focus of the Institute is a multidisciplinary master's degree 
program consisting of courses offered by the Departments of Electrical and 
Computer Engineering, Industrial Engineering, Mechanical and Aerospace 
Engineering, Computer Science, and Economics and Business. The degree pro- 
gram provides flexibility to meet the changing needs of industry and students. 
An interdisciplinary minor is also available for students who wish to pursue an 
M.S. or Ph.D. program in a specific department. The goal of the degree program 
is to provide an academic background essential to the understanding and imple- 
mentation of computer integrated manufacturing systems. 

The IMSE degree does not include specified major and minor areas of study as 
normally found in classical master's degree programs. By its very nature, the 
manufacturing function is multidisciplinary, cutting across traditional engi- 
neeringdisciplinesaswell asothers includingeconomics, business and computer 
science. The development and use of computer technology in modern manufac- 
turing systems for planning, design, control and information access requires a 
multidisciplinary approach. 



200 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

A typical program of study extends over sixteen months for a student sup- 
ported on a half-time assistantship. However, it is possible to complete the 
academic program in as few as twelve months. The curriculum includes a min- 
imum of 27 credit hours of graduate course work in addition to participation in 
the research activities of the Institute for six hours of credit. Additional course 
work may be required, dependent upon the background of the student. This may 
be in the form of immigration modules, or undergraduate courses, for which no 
graduate credit is received. At least six credit hours must be at the advanced 
graduate level. The IMSE degree does not require a thesis; however, a compre- 
hensive technical report must be prepared by each student on the required 
six-credit-hour research project. 

The general plan of study for the IMSE degree consists of three components: 
core courses, concentration electives and a research project. 

Program Requirements Credit Hours 
Core Courses (5) 15 

Concentration Electives (4) 12 

Research Project 6 

Total Hours 33 

Five core courses, required of all students, present an interdisciplinary overview 
of subject material basic to manufacturing systems. Subject matter specializa- 
tion is provided in the student's plan of work through the selection of a minimum 
of four electives in an area of concentration. The five following concentrations are 
offered by the Institute: 

1) Manufacturing Automation 

2) Manufacturing Operations Management 

3) Design for Manufacture 

4) Sensors, Controls and Robotics 

5) Artificial Intelligence and Information Handling 

Over thirty courses are available in the concentration areas. A list of these 
offerings can be obtained from the Institute. The six credit hours of required 
individual or team research project complement and reinforce the area of 
concentration. 

Core Courses: Credit Hours 

IE 516 CAM I: A Systemic Approach to Computer-aided 

Manufacturing 3 

IE 518 Manufacturing Operations Management 

or 

IE 523 Production Planning, Scheduling and Inventory Control 3 

MAE 542 Design for Automated Assembly 3 

IE 51 1 Capital Investment Economic Analysis 

or 

EB 520 Managerial Finance: Theory and Application 3 

CSC 510 Software Engineering 

or 
CSC 542 Database Management 

or 
CSC 562 Computer Simulation Techniques 3 

Total Credit Hours 15 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 201 

The academic program of each student is tailored to meet specific goals and 
interests. Suggested plans of study in several concentration areas can be obtained 
by contacting the Program Director in the IMSE Institute Office. 

The student's advisory committee is made up of three or more members of the 
graduate faculty who associate with and participate in the activities of the 
Institute. The chairman is normally chosen from the area of concentration the 
student has selected. Other members of the committee come from supporting 
areas of the program. 

Each student is required to pass a final oral examination as a degree require- 
ment. This examination consists principally of a formal presentation and defense 
of the student's participation and accomplishments in the research project activ- 
ity. The student's advisory committee administers the final examination. There 
may be instances in which simultaneous examinations are desirable depending 
on the nature, breadth and complexity of a specific project. The work of individ- 
ual students may complement each other's activities such that a total team 
presentation may be beneficial. In such instances the advisory committees will be 
present for each student and each advisory committee will exercise its own 
perogatives and authority. One committee chairman will be selected out of the 
entire group by all chairmen to moderate the presentation and defense activity. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

IMS 698 Manufacturing Systems Engineering Project. Preqs.: Grad. standing in 
IMSE: CI. 1-3 F,S. Individual or team project work in integrated manufacturing systems 
engineering resulting in an engineering report. Required of all degree candidates in IMSE 
master's program. Forms the basis for IMSE student's final oral examination. 

International Development 

Professor J. L. Apple, Coordinator 

The degree of Master of Technology for International Development (MTID) 
gives an international orientation to the master's degree which is sought in any of 
the scientific, social and professional fields represented at this university. At a 
time when the world is moving inexorably toward greater interchange of people 
and increased commerce among nations, the MTID program provides special- 
ized training for students who are interested in utilizing their skills in interna- 
tional activities, whether technical, consultative or administrative in nature. 

The program of work requires the following: 

1) A total of 36 semester credits, at least half of which must be in the relevant 
professional area. The remainder of the course work provides special orientation, 
sensitivity and understanding for work in a foreign culture. Among these "inter- 
nationalizing" courses, 12 semester credits may be drawn from courses at the 300 
or 400 levels with no more than six credits being taken from the 300 level. 

2) A work experience of a minimum of 12 weeks in a foreign country and a 
substantial report on that field experience. 

3) Conversational facility in one foreign language as determined by an oral 
examination. 

4) A comprehensive written examination, which may be required at the 
discretion of the advisory committee. 



202 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

5) Passage of a comprehensive oral examination conducted by the advisory 
committee. 

The program of study is tailored to the student's individual needs rather than 
following a prescribed course; therefore, the student is expected to be able to 
demonstrate maturity and assume initiative in planning his/her own course of 
study. The relevant department assists in choosing a set of courses which provide 
grounding in the professional area, and the Office of International programs 
assists in identifying appropriate "internationalizing" courses which satisfy the 
student's particular needs and interests. 

The following exemplify MTID plans of study: 

Example 1— Core Area: Animal Science 

Courses in Animal Science 

ANS 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates 3 

ANS 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement 3 

ANS 510 Advanced Livestock Management 3 

ANS 520 Tropical Livestock Production 3 

ANS 540 Ruminant Physiology and Metabolism 3 

PO 524 Comparative Endocrinology 4 

"Internationalizing" Courses 

EB 401 Economics Analysis for Nonmajors 3 

HI 476 Leadership in Modern Africa 3 

HI 498 Independent Study in History 3 

PS 533 Global Problems and Policy 3 

PS 431 International Law and Organization 3 

SOC 652 Comparative Societies 3 

Is 

Total semester hours 37 

Example 2— Core Area: Public Administration 

Courses in Public Administration 

PA 511 Public Administration 3 

PA 516 Public Policy Analysis 3 

PA 612 The Budgetary Process 3 

PA 614 Management Systems 3 

PA 617 Seminar in Organization Theory 3 

PA 621 Collective Negotiations in the Public Service 3 

"Internationalizing" Courses 

EB 448 International Economics 3 

HI 415 Revolutionary Europe 3 

HI 554 History of U.S. Foreign Relations, 1900-Present 3 

PS 64 1 Seminar in Comparative Politics 3 

SOC 503 Contemporary Sociology 3 

SOC 514 Developing Societies 3 

Is 

Total semester hours 36 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 203 

Recognition that the interdependence of nations and the free exchange of ideas 
and technology is vital to global survival is now commanding greater attention 
than at any other time in history. The MTID program is a sophisticated response 
that equips graduates Vv^ith the social, philosophical and technical skills neces- 
sary for employment with national and international organizations (profit and 
non-profit), business firms and government agencies. 

General requirements for admission to the MTID program include a Bache- 
lor's degree from an accredited college or university, a grade point average of 3.0 
("B") in one's undergraduate major and satisfactory performance on the Gradu- 
ate Record Exam. 



Landscape Architecture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor D. W. Dalton, Acting Program Director 

Professors: R. C. Moore, J. C. Raulston Jr., A. L. Sullivan, R. R. Wilkinson; 
Professors Emeriti: R. E. Stipe, E. G. Thurlow; Associate Professors: A. R. 
Abbate, D. Wood; Assistant Professors: W. E. Hooker, F. H. Magallanes; 
Lecturers: R. S. Altman, R. M. Leary, M. E. E. Traer 

The Master of Landscape Architecture degree at NCSU is fully accredited by 
the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board to prepare students from many 
academic backgrounds for careers in landscape architecture. Advanced stand- 
ing is available for students offering undergraduate work in landscape architec- 
ture or closely allied subjects. Students without advanced standing should expect 
to spend the equivalent of three academic years completing the program. 

The MLA degree is both a first professional degree as recognized by state 
registration boards and the professional society (American Society of Landscape 
Architects) as well as a Master's degree in a designated field as described by the 
Graduate School of NCSU. 

For students without preparation in landscape architecture, the beginning 
phase of the program introduces the means by which the landscape is creatively 
altered. Impacts of alteration to the systems of rock, soil, water, flora and fauna 
are considered and evaluated against the social and economic benefits of the 
proposed use, and a well-designed accommodation is sought within the traditions 
of the profession's practical arts and techniques. 

Prior to beginning the second or scholarship and research phase of the pro- 
gram, a graduate advisory committee is nominated by the student, approved by 
the department head, and formally appointed by the Dean of the Graduate 
School. The student and this committee of three faculty advisers constructs a list 
of courses and a final project proposal, constituting a Plan of Graduate Work 
which is submitted for approval to the Graduate School. When approved, the 
Plan serves as a contract for the degree. It may be altered by petition but gives the 
student a clear idea of the path ahead. The Plan of Graduate Work focuses the 
student's program in one of three concentrations: site planning and construction, 
community design, or environmental management, described below. A minor 



204 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

field of study is also specified, for example, horticulture, architecture, computer 
science, forestry, psychology, etc. 

The beginning phase of the program is structured and developmental. Stu- 
dents acquire the skills and traditions of professional practice in both the private 
and public sectors. Site planning, construction, planting, graphics, history and 
design policy are taught in three-credit courses. Design is taught in six-credit 
studios. One studio and two courses per semester constitute a normal graduate 
load. Our academic year is divided into fall and spring semesters and two 
six-week summer sessions. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 

LAR 400 Landscape Architecture Studio. Preqs.: School of Design majors: DF 102; 
Horticultural Science- Landscape Technology option majors: LAR 2SU- 6(0-9) F,S. 

LR 430 Site Planning. Preqs.: MEA 101/110 or MEA 120/110 or SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

LAR 433 Native Plants in Environmental Design. Preqs.: DN 221 or DN 232, HS 211. 
3(2-2) S. 

LAR 444 History of Landscape Architecture. 3(3-0) F. 

LAR 457 Landscape Construction Materials, Methods and Documentation. Preq.: 

LAR 430. 3(2-3) S. 

LAR 494 Internship in Landscape Architecture. Preqs.: Jr. standing in LAR and 3.0 

GPA or better and approval of department head. 3-6 F.2. 

LAR 495 Independent Study in Landscape Architecture. Preg-s./ir. standing in LAR 

and 3.0 GPA or better and approval of department head. 3-6. F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

LAR 510 Graphics for Landscape Architects. Preq.: (yrad. standingor Cp Coreq.: LAR 
600 or CL 3(3-0) F. A series of demonstrations and exercises organized to give students 
exposure to and experience with conventional techniques of graphic representation and 
presentation. 

LAR 511 Community Desig^i Policy. Preq.: (trad, standing or CL 3(3-0) S. The course 
explores the theory and practices of the social policy impact on the designed environment 
and users of that environment. The public community development process studied as it 
relates to the built environment. 

LAR 512 Landscape Resource Management. Preq.: CL 3(1-4) S. Laboratory tech- 
niques course in the methodology of analysis and management of natural resources as it 
relates to landscape architecture. Case study approach to managed resource systems using 
spatial mapping and analysis techniques. 

LAR 521 Values, Theory and Methods of Landscape Architecture. Preq.: Grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) F. The profession of landscape architecture has undergone radical change 
in the past decade. Regional analysis, landscape assessment, land development, urban 
planning, recreation planning, etc., are new and emerging roles for the landscape architect. 
This course develops the core values and theories from which each have emerged and 
surveys the techniques and methods of their development. 

LAR 530 Advanced Site Planning. Preqs.: LAR U30. 3(2-2) S. An expansion of funda- 
mental site planning techniques applied to development of design proposals including 
grading, utilities, layout plans, hydrologic calculations, details and specifications. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 205 

LAR 531 Project Planning and Design. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI; Coreq.: LAR 600. 
S(S-O) S. Procedures and issues in project planning, activity programming and site devel- 
opment discussed in conjunction with three assigned projects. 

LAR 533 Plants and Design. 3(2-2) F. The course examines three landscape types: 
natural landscapes, landscapes altered by man and designed landscapes. Investigation of 
relevant plant materials and planting design processes utilized to reveal natural principles 
as the basis for a design theory and methodology. Course assignments range from an 
analysis of actual plant materials and landscapes to the preparation of contract documents. 

LAR 551 Ethics of Professional Practice in Landscape Architecture. 3(3-0) S. An 
examination of the place of the professional in society, the contents and philosophies of 
various professional codes of ethics, the relationship of the practitioner with clients, peers 
and the public interest. It includes preparation of proposals, conduct as an expert witness, 
office organization and contracts. 

LAR (RRA) 562 Computer Cartography. 3(3-0) S. (See recreation resources adminis- 
tration.) 

LAR 564 Management and Marketing Techniques in Community Design. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. Methods for effective management of community design processes. Emphasis on 
personal management skills, group process techniques, publicity materials, public rela- 
tions and marketing strategies. A technical assistantship with a local agency/organization 
required. 

LAR 573 Historic Preservation. Preqs.: (had. standing and CI. 3(3-0) F. Seminar 
covering the legal, administrative, fiscal and political aspects of preserving and conserving 
buildings, sites, districts, objects and landscapes of architectural, historical and design 
significance as related to community design and planning considerations. Subjects to be 
treated include federal, state and local statutes and ordinances; federal and state court 
decisions and administrative processes. 

LAR 574 Landscape and Townscape Conservation. Preqs.: LAR 511. 3(3-0) S. Exami- 
nation of local, state and federal law affecting the visual quality of large-unit natural and 
built environments such as landscapes and townscapes, as expressed in local ordinances, 
state statutes, executive orders, administrative regulations and court decisions. Emphasis 
placed on the legal, administrative, fiscal and governmental tools and processes for main- 
taining and enhancing visual environmental quality. 

LAR 575 Development Planning. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. The seminar 
presents the concepts, processes and principles used in the design and development of 
communities. The discussions focus on a general development process, the development 
team and the role of the designer in the context of the team. A wide range of project types 
discussed. The seminar presents the relationships of public regulatory policies and pro- 
grams to the community design and development process. 

LAR 576 Master Planning and Design Management. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or 
grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Case studies in master planning and design management 
of "multi-designer" environments such as planned communities, historic districts, urban 
centers, college campuses, retail centers, expos, and corporate and governmental building 
programs. Analysis of design review procedures. Emphasis on collaborative design 
methods. Students prepare and implement a master plan and design management system. 

LAR 592 Special Topics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-3 F,S. Topics of current interest to the 
programs in the School of Design offered by faculty in the School. Subjects offered under 
this number are normally used to test and develop new courses. 

LAR 595 Independent Study. Preq.: Grad. standing. Max. 6. F,S,Sum. Special prob- 
lems in various aspects of design developed under the direction of a faculty member on a 
tutorial basis. 



206 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

LAR 600 Landscape Design Studio. Preq.: Grad. standing. 6(0-12) F,S. The application 
of information and skills developed in course work to environmental design problems. A 
process of site selection, activity programming, site planning, and program evaluation 
followed which employs the creation of interactive communication systems between the 
designer, clients and users. Goals include the design of satisfying new landscapes as well as 
conservation and design strategies for existing culturally important landscapes and 
townscapes. 

LAR 611 Advanced Community Design and Development Control. Preq.: LAR 511. 
:i(l-S) S. Advanced work in design and application of governmental planning and develop- 
ment control techniques to built environments, and impact of such controls on design 
solutions at varying scales. Emphasis on design implications of complex control systems: 
development rights transfer, land use intensity rating systems, planned unit development 
regulations and other zoning and non-zoning site planning regulations. 

LAR 6 1 2 Social Factors Analysis in Site Planning. Preq.: LAR 511 or CL 3(2-1) S. The 
course explores social factors techniques and research applications to the design of the 
landscape. Interaction, neighborhood theory and user preference analysis techniques pres- 
ented through discussion and development of research and case studies. 

LAR 691 Degree Seminar. Preqs.: 3 LAR 600 studios. 0. Each student in his or her 
terminal semester not registered in any other courses and in conjunction with the terminal 
case study will prepare and submit to his or her committee a presentation on the relevance 
of one's m inor to the design process with particular reference to the individual's case study. 

LAR 698 Advanced Research Projects. Preq.s.: 2 LAR 600 studios or CI. 2-6 F,S. 
Graduate students sufficiently prepared may undertake selected research investigations. 
A proposal for such investigations must be submitted prior to consent for enrollment. 



Liberal Studies 

GRADUATE FACULTY 
Professor C. D. Korte, Director 

The Master of Arts in Liberal Studies (M ALS) program is an interdisciplinary 
graduate program which is administered by the Division of University Studies. 
This is a broad, interdisciplinary program of part-time graduate study that 
integrates and expands awareness and that is geared to the student's personal 
interests. Each student, in consultation with an academic advisor, designs an 
individual program of study around an interdisciplinary theme or topic that is of 
intrinsic interest to the student or that relates to the student's professional or 
vocational interests. Students take graduate courses across a range of NCSU 
departments as well as MALS seminars designed specifically for the program. 

The degree requirements consist of 30 hours of course work made up of (1) a 
minimum of three MALS seminars, (2) eighteen hours representing the student's 
interdisciplinary theme or concentration, and (3) a three-credit-hour culminat- 
ing project. Each semester a number of MALS seminars are offered for MALS 
students. Examples of concentrations that are well supported by graduate 
courses in the NCSU curriculum are: science, technology and society; national 
and international issues and decision making; and the American experience. 

This program is offered jointly by the Colleges of Humanities and Social 
Sciences and Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 207 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MLS 600 Proseminar in Liberal Studies. Preq.: Admission to M.A. in liberal studies. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Introductory interdisciplinary proseminar for the Master of Arts in liberal 
studies program. Analysis of disciplinary vs. interdisciplinary inquiry and examination in 
detail of an interdisciplinary topic. Topic varies from semester to semester. 

MLS 601 Seminar in Liberal Studies. Preq.: Admission to M.A. in liberal studies. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. Intensive study of an interdisciplinary issue or area. Seminars, which vary each 
semester, address such topics as the information revolution, defining the American West, 
sociobiology and the social sciences, world trade and world conflict, and technology and 
social disruption. 

MLS 696 Independent Study in Liberal Studies. Preq.: Admission to M.A. in liberal 
studies. 1-6 F.S,Sum. Advanced independent study of an interdisciplinary topic under the 
supervision of a faculty member. 

MLS 697 Independent Project in Liberal Studies. Preq.: Admission to M.A. in liberal 
studies. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Advanced independent research on an interdisciplinary project 
under the supervision of a faculty member. 

Management 

Associate Professor S. E. Margolis, Director 

(graduate Advisor and Program Assistant B. L. Puryear 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

G. F. Abbott, Telecommunications Systems Engineering; F. B. Armstrong, Bio- 
technology; G. A. Berkstresser, Textiles; R. H. Bernhard, Industrial Engineer- 
ing; W. Chou, Computer Studies; S. E. Elmaghraby, Operations Research; T. L. 
Honeycutt, Management Information Systems;D. W. Johnston, Civil Engineer- 
ing; C. P. Jones, Economics and Business; T. W. Reiland, Statistics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: S. G. Allen, F. B. Armstrong, J. R. Canada, G. A. Carlson, R. L. Clark, 
D. A. Dickey, E. W. Erickson, D. Fisher, A. R. Gallant, T. J. Grennes, J. D. 
Hess. D. M. Holthausen, L. A. Ihnen, P. R. Johnson, T. Johnson, C. R. Knoeber, 
J. J. Seater, V. K. Smith, W. A. Smith, D. A. Sumner, K. C. Tai: Associate 
Professors: E. W. Davis Jr.. J. C. Dutton Jr.. D. J. Flath, T. L. Honeycutt, J. S. 
Lapp, S. J. Liebowitz, E. A. McDermed, M. B. McElroy, R. B. Palmquist. J. W. 
Rockness, R. J. Rossana, W. N. Thurman, G. J. Zuckerman; Assistant Profes- 
sors: E. F. Gehringer, K. Mitchell, C. M. Newmark, R. R. Rucker; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: C. B. Oldham 

The Master of Science in Management (MSM) program provides management 
education in the land-grant tradition. Drawing on the historical strength of 
North Carolina State University in applied economics, statistics and technology, 



208 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

the MSM program prepares students for careers that will extend well into the 
twenty-first century. Successful management requires not only an awareness of 
current business practices, but also the theoretical background necessary to 
understand when and why these practices work and when they must be modified. 
The MSM program has strong emphasis on theory and quantitative skills to meet 
these requirements. 

The MSM degree is offered jointly by nine academic areas: economics and 
business, biotechnology, civil engineering, computer science, industrial engi- 
neering, operations research, statistics, telecommunications systems engineer- 
ing, and textile and apparel management. The range of faculty expertise and 
courses available distinguishes the MSM from other graduate management 
programs and provides the MSM student with flexibility in selecting a set of 
courses that will complement their background and career interests. 

The MSM program requires 36 semester hours of graduate course work con- 
sisting of seven core courses required of all students and five courses to be chosen 
in a technical option. 

Included in the core are graduate-level micro- and macroeconomics courses 
(EB 501 and EB 502) which consider the theory of business decisions and the 
determinants of the economic environment in which business operates. Statisti- 
cal methods (ST 514, 512 or 508) and Introduction to Operations Research (OR 
501) provide useful analytical tools. The remainder of the core includes manage- 
rial finance (EB 520), marketing (EB 560), and an elective to be selected from one 
of the following: advanced managerial accounting (ACC 520), personnel man- 
agement (EB 526), or long-range planning (EB 625). 

Suggested technical options have been prepared by each of the participating 
departments and examples are provided below. Complete course offerings are 
listed by department throughout this bulletin. Courses from one or more areas 
may be combined to develop an option that complements the academic and career 
interests of the individual student. 

Economics and Business 

EB 512 Law and Economics 

EB 522 Portfolio and Capital Market Theory 

EB 525 Mangerial Economics 

EB 606 Industrial Organization and Control 

EB 650 Economics Decision Theory 

Biotechnology 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 

GN 695 Special Problems in Genetics 

FS 504 Food Proteins and Enzymes 

FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science 

EB 625 Long Range Planning in Business and Industry 

Civil Engineering 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 

CE 561 Construction Planning and Scheduling 

CE 562 Construction Productivity 

CE 566 Building Construction Systems 

CE 665 Construction Equipment Systems 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 209 

Computer Studies 

CSC (ECE) 501 Design of Systems Programs 

CSC 505 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 

CSC (ECE) 510 Software Engineering 

CSC (ECE) 542 Database Management 

CSC (ECE) 671 Advanced Computer Performance Modelling 

Industrial Engineering 

IE 511 Capital Investment Economic Analysis 

IE 512 Bayesian Decision Analysis for Engineers and Managers 

IE 521 Management Decision and Control Systems 

IE 525 Organizational Planning and Control 

IE 621 Advanced Problems in Management Systems Engineering 

Management Information Systems 

CSC 421 Introduction to Management Information Systems 

CSC 423 Information Resources Management 

CSC (ECE) 510 Software Management 

CSC (ECE) 542 Database Management 

IE 521 Management Decision and Control Systems 

Operations Research 

OR (IE, MA) 505 Linear Programming 
OR (IE) 509 Dynamic Programming 
OR (IE, MA) 586 Network Flows 
OR (MA, ST) 606 Nonlinear Programming 
OR (MA) 614 Integer Programming 

Statistics 

ST 421 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics I 

ST 422 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics II 

ST 517 Applied Least Squares 

ST 518 Applied Time Series Analysis 

ST (EB) 651 Econometrics 

Telecommunications Systems Engineering 

EB 590N Special Economics Topics: Economics and Management of Telecom- 
munications and Public Utilities 

CSC 495N Special Topics in Computer Science: Data Networks 

ECE 492X Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering: Introductory 
Concepts in Communications Systems 

ECE 592R Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering: Telecom- 
munications Systems Engineering 

OR (IE) 561 Queues and Stochastic Service Systems 

Textile and Apparel Management 

TAM 530 Textile Quality Control 

TAM (EB) 585 Market Research in Textiles 

TAM 680 Special Projects in Textile Management 

TAM 686 Advanced Textile Labor Management Seminar 

TAM 687 Competitive Strategy and Planning for the Textile Firm 

A project paper and a final oral examination are required of each student. The 
project paper is usually written in conjunction with one of the 600-level courses 
and often involves an analysis of a problem faced by a local business firm. Defense 



210 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

of the paper constitutes the basis for the final oral examination that is conducted 
by the student's graduate advisory committee. 

Prerequistes for the MSM program include two semesters of calculus and one 
semester each of intermediate microeconomics and macroeconomics. Generally a 
student should complete these courses before applying for admission. Domestic 
students may complete this course work by registering through the Division for 
Lifelong Education in a special part-time preparatory program, Post-bacca- 
laureate Studies (PBS). Submission of the Graduate Management Admission 
Test (GM AT) or the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) is highly recommended but 
not required. 

In addition to the prerequisite calculus and economics course work, the MSM 
program requires that students have an undergraduate-level foundation in 
financial and managerial accounting, introductory computer science (including 
some programming) and statistical methods (including regression and analysis 
of variance). Students who have not completed these foundation courses in recent 
undergraduate work should take them early in their graduate programs. 

The MSM program is available to students interested in part-time and full- 
time studies. Approximately two-thirds of the current student enrollment is 
part-time. All core courses and many of the electives are offered in the evening on 
a rotating basis for individuals interested in part-time evening studies. Students 
should consult the program advisors for further information on evening study. 

A wide range of employers have found the analytical nature of the MSM 
program to be very attractive. Recent graduates have been employed by many 
firms, governmental agencies and nonprofit institutions in North Carolina and 
other states. The services of the University's Career Planning and Placement 
Center are available to all students. In addition, economics and business 
employs a placement counselor to serve its current students and recent 
graduates. 

For additional information, contact B. L. Puryear, Graduate Advisor, Econom- 
ics and Business, Box 8109, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695- 
8109, phone (919) 737-7157, or any member of the Program Committee. 

Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. J. Pietrafesa, Head 

Professor G. S. Janowitz, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: C. E. Anderson, S. P. S. Arya, V. V. Cavaroc Jr., J. M. Davis, R. V. 
Fodor, D. Kamykowski, S. Raman, V. K. Saxena, C. W. Welby, T. G. Wolcott, I. 
J. Won; Adjunct Professor: R. L. Bradow; Professors Emeriti: H. S. Brown, L. J. 
Langfelder, C.J. Leith, J. M. Parker III, W.J. Saucier; Associate Professors: M. 
G. Bevis, D. J. DeMaster, M. M. Kimberley, C. E. Knowles, J. M. Morrison, A. J. 
Riordan, W. J. Showers, E. F. Stoddard, G. F. Watson; Visiting Associate 
Professors: V. P. Aneja, D. L. Wolcott; Assistant Professors: N. E. Blair, S. 
Businger, D. M. Checkley Jr., J. P. Hibbard, L. A. Levin, E. L. Leithold, Y.-L. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 211 

Lin, P.-T. Shaw, J. A. Speer: Adjunct Assistant Professors: T. B. Curtin, M. 
DeMaria 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: B. J. Copeland, F. Y. Sorrell Jr., C. C. Tung; Associate Professor: J . M. 

Miller 

The Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences offers graduate 
programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. 

The Atmospheric Science areas of specialization include atmospheric disper- 
sion, boundary layer flows and air quality; mesoscale and severe weather pheno- 
mena; synoptic weather systems and weather forecasting; climatology and agri- 
cultural meteorology; cloud and aerosol physics and atmospheric chemistry. 

Areas of specialization in Earth Science include mineralogy, igneous and 
metamorphic petrology, sedimentology and sedimentary petrology, sedimentary 
geochemistry, economic geology, global and exploration geophysics, structural 
geology, hydrogeology and marine geology. As geology and geophysics are consi- 
dered distinct areas of study, students can major in one area and minor in the 
other. 

In Marine Science, areas of specialization are biological, chemical, geological 
and physical oceanography, geophysical fluid dynamics and marine meteor- 
ology. 

Admission with a specialization in Atmospheric Science requires a bachelor's 
degree in meteorology or other technical areas which include a background in 
chemistry, physics and mathematics. Candidates in Earth Science should hold a 
bachelor's degree in geology or a satisfactory equivalent, preferably with a 
strong background in physics, chemistry and mathematics. Graduate students in 
Marine Science are normally admitted after having received a baccalaureate 
degree in biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics, physics or 
meteorology. 

In each discipline the master's program includes a minimum of 30 semester 
credit hours. Doctoral programs normally contain at least 50 semester credit 
hours beyond the B.S. degree, although course requirements are determined by 
the student's advisory committee. Graduate work includes major and minor 
fields and a research thesis. An M.S., non-thesis option is also available. Marine 
Science students are expected to be familiar with areas of marine studies other 
than their own and are required to complete two (three) courses from other 
Marine Science core areas in the M.S. (Ph.D.) program. 

Sponsored research is being conducted in various areas of geology and geo- 
physics, in air pollution and boundary layer meteorology, cloud and aerosol 
physics, and in Marine Science, in continental shelf, Gulf Stream and climate 
dynamics, geophysical fluid dynamics, sediment transport and water column 
and benthic biology. Graduate students are actively involved in the conduct of the 
research which often forms the basis of their theses. Research projects range 
from theoretical studies to international field experiments. Regional studies are 
being performed within the North Carolina Blue Ridge, Piedmont and Coastal 
Plain as well as in estuaries, on the continental shelf and slope and in the 
Caribbean Sea and Indian Ocean. 



212 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Research facilities are available for analytical work in most areas of geology, 
geophysics and atmospheric sciences. Biological, chemical, geological and physi- 
cal oceanography laboratories and shop facilities for electronic and mechanical 
equipment repair and fabrication are available for student use. Students also 
have on-campus access to the TUCC IBM System 370/165 and Amdahl compu- 
ters and to several smaller computing facilities operated by the department. 
Remote sensing capabilities are utilized in both research and classroom instruc- 
tion. Collections of pertinent literature are available in the University library 
and elsewhere in the Research Triangle area. Consultation with scientists of the 
federal and state agencies in Raleigh as well as with the staffs of the neighboring 
universities is possible and encouraged. 

The State of North Carolina operates three Marine Resources Centers on our 
coast where research space is available. Our students have also made use of 
facilities at Duke University's Marine Laboratory and the National Marine 
Fisheries Laboratory, both on Fivers Island, North Carolina. The department 
has a small boat and is a member of the Duke/UNC consortium that operates the 
new 131 ft. R/V Cape Hatteras. 

Financial aid is available through both teaching assistantships (9 month) and 
research assistantships (9 or 12 month). Government agencies and industry 
occasionally provide part-time employment and small grants from the State are 
sometimes available to assist with thesis expenses. 

Atmospheric Science 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MEA 412 Atmospheric Physics. Preqs.: MA 202, PY 208 or equiv. 3(3-0) S. 

MEA 421 Air Processes and Motions L Preqs.: MA 202, PY 208, MEA 311, 312, 313, 
31U. M3-2) F. 

MEA 422 Air Processes and Motions IL Preq.: MEA i21. M3-2) S. 

MEA 443 Weather Analysis and Forecasting \. Preq.: MEA U21. 3(1-6) F. 

MEA 444 Weather Forecasting Principles. Preq.: MEA U3. 3(2-3) F. 

MEA 455 Micrometeorology. Preq.: MEA U22 or MAE A02. 3(3-0) F. 

MEA 493 Special Topics in Meteorology. Preq.: Consent of department. 1-3 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MEA 501 Environmental Fluid Mechanics. Preqs.: MA 202, PY 208. 3(3-1) F. Basic 
concepts and the laws governing the motion of the atmosphere and oceans developed from 
first principles, including approximations valid for environmental flows, the kinematics, 
dynamics and thermodynamics of fluid flows as well as an introduction to environmental 
turbulence. Arya, Janowitz 

MEA 512 Satellite Meteorology. Preq.: MA 202; Coreq.: MEA U3. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Basic background in satellite orbits, coordinate systems and image navigation; description 
ofsensorsand techniques for quantitative measurementof atmospheric variables. Applica- 
tions of satellite data in analysis of weather systems; evolution of convective systems, 
tropical disturbances and mid-latitude cyclones as revealed by visible and infrared imag- 
ery; current research in satellite applications. Businger, Riordan 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 213 

MEA 514 Advanced Physical Meteorology. Preqs.: MEA ^12, V21. 3(3-0) F. The fun- 
damental laws and concepts of thermodynamics and electromagnetic radiative transfer 
considered in an atmospheric context. These principles then applied to a number of meteo- 
rological problems, including those of radiative climate models, the global energy balance, 
atmospheric aerosols, lidar/radar backscatter and remotely sensed temperature fields. 

Saxena 

MEA 524 Dynamic Meteorology. Preq.: MEA U22 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A brief review 
of the classical and physical hydrodynamics; scale analysis of dynamic equations; atmos- 
pheric instabilities; dynamics of tropical convections; perturbation theory and approxima- 
tions for atmospheric wave motions. Lin 

MEA 525 Numerical Weather Prediction. Preqs.: MEA 52Jt, CSC (MA) Jt27 or equival- 
ent and some FORTRAN programming experience. 3(3-0) F,S. Alt. yrs. Physical and 
mathematical basis of numerical weather prediction with computer experiments to dem- 
onstrate principles and techniques. Topics include derivation of sets of prediction equations 
consistent with scale analysis and dynamical constraints; atmospheric waves and filtered 
equations; numerical methods and computational instabilities; filtered and primitive equa- 
tion models; NWS operational models. Watson 

MEA 526 Air-Sea Interaction. Preq.: MEA U22 or MEA 560 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Review of basic equations and concepts of turbulent transfer in geophysical flows, air-sea 
interaction processes and their importance to man's activities, theory and observation of 
wind-generated ocean surface waves, turbulent transfers in the planetary boundary layer 
of the marine atmosphere, oceanic mixed layer, development of thermocline and inversion. 

Pietrafesa, Raman 

MEA 527 Planetary Boundary Layer. Preq.: MEA J,55 or MEA 526 or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Alt. yrs. Reviewof the basic equations and concepts of planetary boundary layers. Study of 
the closure problem and semi-empirical theories of turbulence, buoyancy effects on mean 
flow and turbulence, instrumentation and observational platforms for PBL experiments, 
ob&$. served characteristics of atmospheric boundary layers, numerical and physical 
modeling of PBL and its parameterization in large-scale atmospheric circulation models. 

Arya 

MEA 528 Coastal Meteorology. Preq.: MEA If55. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. Importance and com- 
plexity of coastal meteorological processes; modification induced by surface inhomogenei- 
ties; development of internal boundary layers; thermally induced internal boundary layers; 
coastal fumigation processes; structure and development of sea and land breezes; analytical 
and numerical modeling of sea breezes; coastal fronts; storm surges; prediction models for 
storm surges; cold air outbreaks; baroclinic boundary layer processes near coastal areas. 

Raman 

MEA 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. Preqs.: PY 205 or 211; CHIOS or 107; MA 1 02 
or 112. 3(3-0) F. A course designed for graduate students in the life sciences, presenting the 
physical principles governing the states and processes of the atmosphere in contact with 
earth's surface of land, water and life. Exchanges of heat, mass and momentum analyzed 
for various conditions of the atmosphere and surface and as a function of season, time and 
geographic location. Davis 

MEA 556 Air Pollution Meteorology. Preqs.: MA 201 or 212, PY 208 or 212, CH 103 or 
105 or 107 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Wind structure in the atmospheric surface layer and 
planetary boundary layer; temperature structure and stability; mixed layer and inver- 
sions; turbulence intensity and scale; meteorological factors affecting the dispersion of 
pollutants; diffusion theories and models; diffusion and transport experiments; plume rise, 
fumigation and trapping; removal processes; effects of buildings and hills; effects of local 
winds. Arya 

MEA 557 Advanced Cloud and Precipitation Physics. Preq.: MEA U21 or MEA U12. 
3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An analysis of the microstructure of warm and cold clouds and precipita- 



214 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

tion. cloud microphysics-dynamics interactions, formation of cloud droplets, growth of 
cloud droplets by condensation, initiation of rain in nonfreezing clouds, formation and 
growth of ice crystals, precipitation theories, planned and inadvertent weather modifica- 
tion and the problem of acid rain. Saxena 

MEA558 Atmospheric Aerosols. Preqs.: CH 103 or 107 and PY 205 or 21 1: Coreq.: MEA 
U12. 3(3-0) S.Alt, i/rs. An understandingofaerosols as primary air pollutants, indoor versus 
outdoor pollution, transformation processes, prediction of atmospheric concentrations, 
scavenging of aerosols, transport of air pollutants on a regional scale, discussion of national 
experiments to characterize and study the impact of urban-industrial pollution, tropos- 
pheric aerosol and weather, stratospheric aerosol, effect of aerosols on atmospheric warm- 
ing and cooling and air-quality models. Saxena 

ME A (MAE) 563 Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. Preq.: MAE 550 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
F. Alt. yrs. The principles of fluid mechanics applied to geophysical systems. Special 
emphasis placed on those features of these systems, such as almost rigid rotation and stable 
stratification, which produce unique and important effects. The effects of almost rigid 
rotations on homogeneous and stratified flows examined in detail. Janowitz 

MEA 593 Special Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Special topics in meteorology, pro- 
vided to groups or to individuals. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MEA 627 Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion. Preq.: MEA h22. 3(3-0) F. Mechan- 
ics of turbulence in the atmosphere, spectra and scales of atmospheric turbulence and 
magnitudes of turbulent fluctuations. Theories of diffusion in the atmosphere. Diffusion 
and transport experiments. Processes other than natural turbulence affecting concentra- 
tion of effluents. Arya 

MEA 635 Dynamical Analysis of the Atmosphere. Pre'qs.: MEA UL US. 3(2-3) F. 
Theory and analysis of circulation and weather systems based on dynamical concepts; 
structure, movement and development of systems: evaluation of theoretical concepts in 
prognosis and forecasting. Lin 

MEA (MAE) 663 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. Preq.: MAE 550 or equi- 
valent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The principles of fluid mechanics are applied to geophysical 
systems. Special emphasis placed on the role of stable stratification on the flows in these 
systems. The generation, interaction, propagation and dissipation of internal gravity waves 
studied in detail. Other geophysically important flows also studies. Janowitz 

MEA 695 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Presentation of scientific articles 
and special lectures. Each student required to present or critically review one or more 
papers. Graduate Staff 

MEA 699 Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing and consent of advisory committee. Credits 
Arranged. F,S. Graduate research in fulfillment of requirements for a graduate degree. 

Graduate Staff 

Earth Science 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MEA 415 Geology of Metalliferous Deposits. Preqs.: MEA UO, MEA U52. 3(2-3) S. 

MEA 423 Invertebrate Paleontology and Biostratigraphy. Preqs.: MEA 201/210 or 
ZO 202. U(3-S) F. 

MEA 440 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. Preq.: MEA 331. M3-3) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 215 

MEA 452 Sedimentary Petrologry and Stratigraphy. Coreq.: MEA 331. M3-3) S. 

MEA 461 Engineering Geology. Preq.: MEA 101 or 120. 3(3-0) F. 

MEA 465 Geologic Field Camp I. Preqs.: MEA 351, UO, U52. First part of 6 weeks 
out-of-state summer field camp. Both MEA It65 andJt66 must be taken in the same summer. 3 
Sum. 

MEA 466 Geologic Field Camp II. Preq.: MEA i65. Second part of 6 weeks out-of-state 
summer field camp. Both MEA UOS and U66 must be taken in the same summer. 3 Sum. 

MEA 470 Principles of Geophysics. Preqs.: PY 208 or 212; MEA 120 or equivalent 
recommended. 3(3-0) F. 

MEA 471 Exploration and Engineering Geophysics. Preq.: MEA i70 or PY 208. 
Credit may not be received for both MEA U71 and MEA 570. 3(3-0) F. 

MEA 475 Geophysical Field Methods. Preq.: MEA U71. Credit is not allowed for both 
MEA Jt75 and MEA 575. 2 cr. Sum. field camp. 

MEA 476 Seismic Exploration for Oil. Preqs.: PY208, knowledge of FORTRAN. Credit 
is not allowed for both MEA U76 and MEA 576. 3(3-0) S. 

MEA 481 Principles of Geomorphology. Preq.: MEA 201 or equivalent. 3(2-2) F. 

MEA 491 Seminar on Selected Geologic Topics. 1-3 F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MEA 500 Regional Geology of North America. Preqs.: MEA 101 or 120, sr. standing. 
1-6 F,S. Field study of classic geologic localities and geomorphic processes not indigenous to 
North Carolina. Typical areas are New England and adjacent Canada, northern Mexico 
and southwestern United States and the Pacific Northwest. Representative subjects 
include the Canadian Shield, Precambrian mineral deposits, the San Andreas fault, desert 
geomorphology. Grand Canyon stratigraphy, modern and ancient reefs and glaciated 
volcanoes. Mineral, rock and fossil collecting. Student reports required. Graduate Staff 

MEA 510 Geological Oceanography. Preq.: MEA Jf52 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A com- 
prehensive overview of the geological aspects of oceanography. Topics include: a) marine 
geophysics and the evolution of ocean basins, b) sedimentological processes and the forma- 
tion of marine deposits, c) marine geochemistry and authigenic sedimentation, d) paleocea- 
nography and the interpretation of marine stratigraphy. Showers 

MEA 515 Topics in Southern Appalachian Geology. Preqs.: MEA 351 and MEA UJ^O 
or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Examination of the geology of North Carolina and sur- 
rounding areas. Lectures, discussions, reading of and review of current literature and 
consideration of ideas concerning the geological evolution of the area. A term project on a 
selected topic required. Required field trips. Stoddard 

MEA 522 Petroleum Geology. Preq.: MEA Jt52. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Properties, origin and 
modes of occurrence of petroleum and natural gas. Geologic and economic features of the 
principal oil and gas fields, mainly in the United States. Graduate Staff 

MEA 523 Introduction to Subsurface Well Evaluation. Preqs.: CH 103, PY212, MEA 
120. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. Principles, uses and interpretation of commonly used wireline 
technique for structural, lithologic and fluid evaluation of wells. Oriented towards petro- 
leum reserve/evaluations. Cavaroc 

MEA 542 Intermediate Petrographic Analysis. Preq.: MEA UUO or equivalent. 2(0-5) 
F. Systematic study of rocks in thin section by means of the petrographic microscope. 



216 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Mineralogy, mineral and rock compositions and rock textures applied to an interpretation 
of the origin and crystallization or depositional history of specimens studied. Suites repre- 
sentative of each of the three major rock groups studied during the first half of the semester; 
during the remainder of the semester, the student concentrates on suites representative of 
his/her area of specialization. Cavaroc, Stoddard 

MEA 545 Advanced Igneous Petrology. Preq.: MEA UO. 3(2-2) S. Alt. yrs. Physico- 
chemical principles related to igneous petrogenesis. General principles and specific prob- 
lems including the origin, differentiation and emplacement of magmas and the possible 
relationships of igneous processes to global tectonics. Fodor 

MEA 546 Advanced Metamorphic Petrology. Preq.: MEA UO. 3(2-2) S. Alt. yrs. The 
petrogenesis of metamorphic rocks including conditions of metamorphism, metamorphic 
facies and facies series, the petrogenetic grid, contact and regional metamorphism, 
metamorphism and plate tectonics. Heterogeneous chemical equilibrium and application 
of Gibbs Phase Rule to metamorphic rocks. Thermodynamically valid algebraic and gra- 
phical analysis of equilibrium mineral assemblages. Chemical zoning. Petrographic stu- 
dies of selected metamorphic suites. Speer, Stoddard 

MEA 551 Advanced Structural Geology. Preq.: MEA 351. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. Principles 
of rock mechanics and their application in solving geologic problems; finite strain analysis 
of deformed rocks; advanced techniques of structural analysis; petrofabrics; development 
of various geologic structures. Course designed to emphasize the application of principles 
and techniques in the field. Hibbard 

MEA 562 Applied Sedimentary Analysis. Preqs.: MEA U52, ST 361. 3(2-2) F. Alt. yrs. 
Extension of MEA 452, with emphasis on coarser grained clastic sedimentary rocks. 
Sampling of sedimentary population, critical study of assumptions underlying standard 
measurement techniques; treatment, testing and evaluation of sedimentary data; applica- 
tion to problems in sedimentology. Cavaroc 

MEA 564 Depositional Environments and Lithostratigraphy. Preq.: MEA 452 or 
grad. standing. 3(2-3) S. Fabric of large sedimentary basins in terms of the spatial distribu- 
tion of component major rock facies; current litho-genetic models based upon comparison 
with recent equivalents; field trips. Cavaroc 

MEA 565 Hydrogeology. Preq.: MEA h52. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Occurrence and sources of 
surface and subsurface water. Relationships of surface water to subsurface water. Rock 
properties affecting infiltration, movement, lateral and vertical distribution and quality of 
ground water. Determination of permeability, capacity, specific yield and other hydraulic 
characteristics of aquifers. Principles of well design, legal aspects of water supplies. 

Welby 

MEA 566 Hydrogeology of Groundwater Pollution and Protection. Preq.: MEA 565 
or CE 543 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Hydrogeologic factors associated with protection 
of groundwater; use of geologic principles and materials to protect groundwater quality; 
geologic evaluation and monitoring of waste disposal sites, including appropriate models. 

Welby 

MEA 567 Geochemistry. Preq.: CH 331 or U33. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. The quantitative 
distribution of elements in the earth's crust, the hydrosphere and the atmosphere. Applica- 
tion of the laws of chemical equilibrium and resultant chemical reactions to natural earth 
systems. Geochemical application of Eh-pH diagrams. Geochemical cycles. Isotope geo- 
chemistry. Kimberley 

MEA 570 Exploration and Engineering Geophysics. Preq.: MEA 470 or PY 208. 
Credit in both MEA 470 and MEA 570 is not allowed. 3(3-0) S. Geophysical methods as 
applied to exploring the earth's mineral and energy resources and to investigating subsur- 
face geological structure and physical properties. Principles, measurements, analyses, and 
interpretations of gravity, magnetic, electric, electromagnetic, seismic methods. Research 
paper required. Won 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 217 

MEA 572 Laboratory and Field Methods for Investigation of the Seabed. Preqs.: 

MEA 510orCHl07orMEA 571. S(2-3)S.Alt. yrs. An initial lecture and laboratory phase 
acquaints the student with the use of advanced techniques and instrumentation for chemi- 
cal and geological oceanographic investigations. A field project in the the coastal waters of 
North Carolina and then allows application of these tools to a specific marine problem. 

DeMaster 

MEA 575 Geophysical Field Methods. Preq.: MEA 570. Credit in both MEA U75 and 
MEA 575 is not allowed. 2(2-week summer camp) Sum. Alt. yrs. Two-week summer field 
course. Practical geophysical field measurements using instruments for gravity, magnetic, 
electric, electromagnetic and radioactivity methods. Data interpretation in terms of sub- 
surface geological structures and their physical properties, locations, sizes and shapes. 
Students required to register for the course in the second summer session. Location: within 
the state of North Carolina. Estimated expense: $150.00. Research paper required. 

Bevis, Won 

MEA 576 Seismic Explortion for Oil. Preqs.: PY 208 and knotvledge of FORTRAN 
lanquage. Credit in both MEA U76 and MEA 576 is not allowed. 3(3-0) S. A comprehensive 
introduction to the reflection seismic method as applied to exploring oil and gas resources. 
Seismic instrumentation, field data acquisition, common-depth-point method, deconvolu- 
tion, digital filtering, migration and seismic stratigraphy of hydrocarbon depositional 
environments, along with computer-oriented exercises. Research paper required. Won 

MEA 577 Sedimentary Geochemistry. Preq.: CH331 or CHU31 or MEA 567 or equiva- 
lent background. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. This course applies thermodynamic data to the calcula- 
tion of reactions in natural waters at or near the earth's surface. Topics include weathering 
to form clay minerals, precipitation of economic minerals and carbonate sedimentology. 

Kimberley 

MEA 583 Photogeology and Remote Sensing. Preqs.: MEA 101 or 120, MEA U81 or 
equivalent. 3(2-3) S. Study and interpretation of aerial photographs and other remotely 
sensed data for geological information relating to mineral resource exploration and evalua- 
tion and geological controls on environmental problems. Welby 

MEA 588 Regional Tectonics. Preqs.: MEA 351, UO, J,52. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Methods of 
study of the tectonic history of major geologic regions in North America and other areas of 
the world through the application of stratigraphy, petrology and structural geology. Syn- 
thesizing regional tectonic patterns and events. Bevis, Hibbard 

MEA 593 Special Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. Special study of some advanced phases of 
geology. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MEA 610 Marine Sedimentology. Preq.: MEA 510. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A quantitative 
examination of sedimentology with specific reference to the marine environment including 
an introduction to fluid mechanics, sediment transport theory, quantitative models of 
sedimentation and dynamic stratigraphy. Leithold 

MEA 630 Geotectonics. Preqs.: MEA 351, UO, Jk52. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. In-depth examina- 
tion of current ideas in plate tectonic theory. Plate tectonic controls on orogeny, orogenic 
belts, magmatism and metallogeny. Bevis 

MEA 670 Advanced Geophysics L Preqs.: MEA 570 and MA Wl. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Advanced geophysical theories and applications: topics chosen from the potential field 
theory of Laplace and Poisson, gravity, heatflow, magnetism, electric and electromagentic 
fields as means of investigating the earth's internal structure. Understanding geodynamic 
principles and applications to exploring for mineral and hydrocarbon resources. Bevis 



218 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ME A 671 Advanced Geophysics II. Preqs.: MEA 570 and MA Wl. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Advanced geophysical theories and applications: topics chosen from scalar and vector wave 
propagation phenomena in geophysics, earthquake seismology, focal mechanisms, propa- 
gation of body and surface waves, plate tectonics, advanced reflection seismology for oil and 
gas exploration, electromagnetic waves as applied to mineral exploration. Won 

MEA 695 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Scientific articles, progress 
reports and special problems of interest to geologists and geological and mining engineers 
discussed. Graduate Staff 

MEA 699 Research. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Lectures reading assign- 
ments and reports; special work in geology to meet the needs and interests of the students. 
Thesis problem. Graduate Staff 

Marine Science 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MEA 501 Environmental Fluid Mechanics. Preqs.: MA 202, PY 208. 3(3-1) F. Basic 
concepts and the laws governing the motion of the atmosphere and oceans developed from 
first principles, including approximations valid for environmental flows, the kinematics, 
dynamics and thermodynamics of fluid flows as well as an introduction to environmental 
turbulence. Arya, Janowitz 

MEA 510 Geological Oceanography. Preq.: MEA U52 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A com- 
prehensive overview of the geological aspects of oceanography. Topics include: a) marine 
geophysics and the evolution of ocean basins, b) sedimentological processes and the forma- 
tion of marine deposits, c) marine geochemistry and authigenic sedimentation, d) paleocea- 
nography and the interpretation of marine stratigraphy. Showers 

MEA (ZO) 520 Principles of Biological Oceanography. Preqs.: BS 100 and either BO 
(ZO) 360 or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Biological productivity and trophic relationships in 
Plankton, Nekton and Benthos; community ecology of selected habitats (estuaries, interti- 
dal zones, coral reefs, deep sea) and adaptation of organisms to the marine environment. 

Wolcott 

MEA 526 Air-Sea Interaction. Preq.: MEA h22 or MEA 560 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Review of basic equations and concepts of turbulent transfer in geophysical flows, air-sea 
interaction processes and their importance to man's activities, theory and observation of 
wind-generated ocean surface waves, turbulent transfers in the planetary boundary layer 
of the marine atmosphere, oceanic mixed layer, development of thermocline and inversion. 

Pietrafesa, Raman 

MEA (ZO) 534 Marine Benthic Ecology. Preqs.: ZO 302, ZO 509 or ZO 517 or MEA 
(ZO) 520. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Marine benthic systems in the deep sea and in shallow waters, 
focusing upon the abiotic and biotic processes which regulate density, diversity and taxo- 
nomic and functional composition. Discussions of benthic-pelagic coupling, predation, 
interspecific competition, biogeography, sampling problems, evolutionary trends, trophic 
structure and community organization. Levin 

MEA (CE)541 Gravity Wave Theory 1. Preq.: MAE 308 or PY 41 1 ■ 3(3-0) S. Classical 
gravity wave theory with emphasis on the basic mechanics of wave motions, mass transport 
induced by waves and various conservation laws with their applications in wave study. 

Knowles 

MEA 559 Synoptic Physical Oceanography. Preq.: MEA 560orMEA 561. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Basicdiscussionof the techniques and terminology of synoptic physical oceanography; 
focus on water characteristics and their relationship to currents in the individual oceans; a 
systematic quantitative description of the character of ocean waters and their movements. 

Morrison 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 219 

ME A 560 Principles of Physical Oceanography. Preqs.: MA 212 and PY 212 or equi- 
valent. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to the principles and practice of physical oceanography. 
Subjects to be covered include: the equation of state of seawater; energy transfer to the 
ocean by thermal, radiative and mechanical processes; the heat budget; oceanic boundary 
conditions; the geographical distribution of oceanic properties; observational methods; 
conservation equations; simple waves and tides; physical oceanography of the North Caro- 
lina coastal zone. Morrison 

ME A 561 Introduction to Physical Oceanography. Preqs.: MA 301, PY 208 or CI. 
3(3-0) F. An introduction to the descriptive and dynamical features of ocean circulation. 
Topics to be covered include the physical properties of seawater, oceanic heat budget, fluid 
mechanics, dynamics of ocean currents, descriptive oceanography, tides and other waves. 

Morrison 

MEA (MAE) 563 Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. Preq.: MAE 550 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
F. Alt. y)-s. The principles of fluid mechanics applied to geophysical systems. Special 
emphasis placed on those features of these systems, such as almost rigid rotation and stable 
stratification, which produce unique and important effects. The effects of almost rigid 
rotations on homogeneous and stratified flows examined in detail. Janowitz 

MEA 568 Ocean Circulation. Preq.: MAE 308 or PY Ull. 3(3-0) F. Basic study of the 
mechanics of ocean circulation with emphasis on various simple models of circulation 
systems. Pietrafesa 

MEA 569 The Physical Dynamics of Estuaries. Pre(?s.;M^ 202 or 2i2,PF;205 or ;2i^ or 
CI. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A physical/dynamical description of estuaries and estuarine processes 
which occur as a function of tides, atmospheric forcing, river runoff and topography. 
Includes classification schemes; the development of salt, heat energy and momentum 
balances; a discussion of biological modeling and sediment transport processes as a function 
of the physical dynamics; conservative and non-conservative pollution dispersion predic- 
tion; and the theoretical, mathematical modeling of estuaries, including those in North 
Carolina. Pietrafesa 

MEA 571 Principles of Chemical Oceanography. Pre(7..Ci^i07oreg'mva/en<.5('5-0^F. 

Chemical processes which control the composition of the oceans, including discussions of 
chemical equilibria, biological cycling of nutrients and the use of chemical tracers in the 
marine environment; the origin and chemical history of the oceans are also considered. 

DeMaster 

MEA 572 Laboratory and Field Methods for Investigation of the Seabed. Preqs.: 
MEA 510 and CH 107 or MEA 571. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. An initial lecture and laboratory phase 
acquaints students with the use of advanced techniques and instrumentation for chemical 
and geological oceanographic investigations. A field project in the coastal waters of North 
Carolina then allows application of these tools to a specific marine problem. DeMaster 

MEA 593 Special Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. This course provides the opportunity for 
advanced undergraduate and graduate students to study timely special problem areas in 
marine science and engineering. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MEA 610 Marine Sedimentology. Preq.: MEA 510. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A quantitative 
examination of sedimentology with specific reference to the marine environment including 
an introduction to fluid mechanics, sediment transport theory, quantitative models of 
sedimentation and dynamic stratigraphy. Leithold 

MEA 613 Continental Margin Sedimentation. Preq.: MEA 510. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A 
detailed examination of the processes and sedimentation active along continental margins. 
The specific environments explored are the continental shelf, slope and rise. 

Graduate Staff 



220 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MEA 622 Marine Plankton Ecology. Preqs.: BCH 1^51 and MA 212 and ZO U9 or 

equivalents. S(S-O) F. Alt. yrs. This course examines the worldwide relationships between 
the physical-chemical environment and planktonic organisms. Topics include organism 
descriptions; the effects of light, temperature, salinity, density, water motion and chemical 
constituents on organisms: interactions among different organisms emphasizing competi- 
tion and predation: community structure, distribution and succession: and mathematics 
models of distribution, production and interaction. Kamykowski 

MEA (ZO) 623 Advances in Marine Community Ecology. Preqs.: ZO 302 and ZO 51 7 

or ZO 560 or MEA (ZO) 53 A. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Current research and biological and physical 
processes structuring shallow and deep water benthic communities. Recent research on 
competition, predation, disturbance, succession, animal-sediment-flow interactions, life 
history tactics and experimental design in marine benthic biology. Student discussion of 
current issues and critique of recent papers. Levin 

MEA (ZO) 624 Ecology of Fishes. Preq.: BO (ZO) 360 or 560 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 
Physiological ecology of fishes emphasizing energetics, production and adaptations to 
aquatic mediums. Ecological classification of fishes and theory of resource partitioning in 
freshwater, estuarine and marine realms. Miller 

MEA (MAE) 663 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. Preq.: MAE 550 or equi- 
valent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The principles of fluid mechanics are applied to geophysical 
systems. Special emphasis placed on the role of stable stratification on the flows in these 
systems. The generation, interaction, propagation and dissipation of internal gravity waves 
studied in detail. Other geophysically important flows also studied. Janowitz 

MEA (MAE) 664, 665 Perturbation Method in Fluid Mechanics 1, U. Preqs.: MA 401, 
MAE308. 3(3-0) F,S. Alt. yrs. Basic theory and application of perturbation methods in fluid 
mechanics including: regular and singular perturbations, matching principles, method of 
strained coordinate, two variable expansion and applications to partial differential 
equations. Janowitz 

MEA 674 Marine Geochemistry. Preqs.: CH 331, MEA 571 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. A detailed examination of the chemical processes occurring in the marine environ- 
ment. Topics discussed include: chemical evolution of the oceans, continental and subma- 
rine weathering, particle scavenging of reactive elements from the water, column, forma- 
tion of biogenic and metalliferous deposits, sediment diagenesis and marine geochronology. 

DeMaster 

MEA 693 Advanced Special Topics. Preqs.: Grad. standing and CI. 1-3. This course 
provides the opportunity for advanced graduate students to study in special problem areas 
in marine sciences. Various areas in the program may use this course concurrently in their 
areas. Graduate Staff 

MEA 699 Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing and consent of advisory committee. Credits 
Arranged. F,S. Graduate Staff 

Materials Science and Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J.J. Hren, Head 

Professor H. Palmour III, Associate Department Head 

Professor, A. A. Fahmy, Graduate Administrator 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 221 

Professors: K. J. Bachmann, J. R. Beeler Jr., R. B. Benson Jr., H. Conrad, R. F. 
Davis, C. C. Koch, K. L. Moazed, J. Narayan, G. A. Rozgonyi, R. 0. Scattergood, 
H. H. Stadelmaier; Adjunct Professors: G. Mayer, J. L. Routbort; Professors 
Emeriti: W. W. Austin, J. K. Magor, R. F. Stoops; Associate Professor: P. E. 
Russell; Visiting Associate Professor: J. C. Russ; Adjunct Associate Professor: I. 
Turlik; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. V. Hamme; Assistant Professors: 
C. M. Balik, N. A. El-Masry, J. T. Glass, A. I. Kingon; Lecturer: R. L. Porter 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: J . A. Bailey, K. Havner, Y. Horie, G. Lucovsky, A. Reisman; Associate 
Professor: R. J. Nemanich 

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers graduate pro- 
grams leading to the degrees of Master of Science, Master of Materials Science 
and Engineering and Doctor of Philosophy. Students with appropriate back- 
grounds in engineering, chemistry or physics can be accommodated, although 
most students enter the program with degrees in a materials-related discipline. 
Financial aid is available on a competitive basis to qualified students. 

Graduate students in materials engineering are involved with academic stu- 
dies and research programs that focus on understanding the structure, structure 
modification and properties of materials. Included is the development of new or 
improved materials and advanced processing methods, which are critical links 
between the design and the realization of new systems. Materials and materials 
limitations pervade all of the engineering and high technology fields that are an 
integral part of our society. The challenges and opportunities for graduates in 
materials engineering are exceptional. 

Research in the department comprises a wide range of programs that deal with 
physical, chemical and mechanical behavior involving both bulk and surface 
phenomena in metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. There are rapidly 
growing activities in the areas of microelectronic materials, advanced processing 
methods for metals and ceramics, non-equilibrium structures and surface modi- 
fication processes. The research programs are supported by state-of-the-art facil- 
ities for preparation, processing and characterization of materials. An ion-beam 
microprobe, analytical scanning-transmission microscopy and VAX-based com- 
puter facility are among the recent acquisitions that support departmental 
research programs. 

The faculty in materials science and engineering offers experience in all of the 
basic materials-related disciplines. Each student's program is designed to pro- 
vide the appropriate balance of academic and research work consistent with that 
student's background and career objectives. 

A brochure describing the department's graduate programs, research inter- 
ests and faculty members is available upon request. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MAT 400 Metallic Materials in Engineering Design. Preq.: MAT 200 or 201. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 



222 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MAT 410 Computer Applications for Materials Engineering. Preqs.: CSC HI; 
Coreq.: MAT SSO. S(S-O) F. 

MAT 423 Materials Factors in Design. Preq.: MAT U50. 3(2-3) F. 

MAT 431 Physical Metallurgy I. Preqs.: MAT 321, 1,50. U(U-O) F. 

MAT 432 Physical Metallurgy II. Preq.: MAT 1,31. 3(3-0) S. 

MAT 435 Physical Ceramics I. Preqs.: MAT 321, MAT U3U. 3(3-0) S. 

MAT 436 Physical Ceramics II. Preq.: MAT U35. 3(3-0) S. 

MAT 450 Mechanical Properties of Materials. Preq.: MAT 325 and 330; MAE 3U. 
3(3-0) F. 

MAT 460 Microelectronic Materials. Preqs.: MA T 332, ECE Ul. 3(3-0) S. 
FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAT 500 Modern Concepts in Materials Science. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. 
Fundamentals of structure, structure modification and properties of materials with 
emphasis on structure-property relationships and the modern theory of solids. 

MAT 501 Diffusion and Mass Transport Processes in Solids. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F. 
Interatomic forces and crystal structure, basic concepts in diffusion theory, diffusion and 
mass transport in metals and alloys, semiconductors, ionic crystals (ceramics) and amor- 
phous materials. Diffusion along dislocations and grain boundaries, surface and interface 
diffusion, electromigration and thermomigration, concentration-enhanced diffusion, tran- 
sient diffusion, stress-induced diffusion, mass and heat transport during rapid solidifica- 
tion, radiation damage and defect diffusion. 

MAT 502 Defects in Solids. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) Sum. Defect structure in ionic, covalent and 
metallic solids of either a crystalline or an amorphous nature. Effects of defects on the 
mechanical, electrical, magnetic, chemical and optical properties of solids. Computer 
software is provided for the exploration of defect interactions via computer simulation. 

MAT 504 Electrical, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials. Preqs.: MAT 500, 
510. 3(3-0) S. Electron theory of materials, band theory; electrical behavior of metals, 
semiconductors, dielectrics and noncrystalline materials; theory of optical behavior and 
applications; foundations of magnetic properties and applications of ferrites and perman- 
ent magnetic materials. 

MAT 505 Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials. Preqs.: MAT U50, MAT 
502. 3(3-0) S. Both fundamental and engineering aspects of mechanical behavior of mate- 
rials covered. Elasticity, plasticity and dislocation theory concepts used to describe phe- 
nomenological behavior and micromechanical mechanisms. Topics covered include strength- 
ening mechanisms in crystals, high-temperature deformation, fracture mechanics, 
fracture toughening mechanisms and cyclic deformation. Various aspects of deformation 
of noncrystalline solids also included. 

MAT 506 Phase Transformations and Kinetics. Preqs.: MAT 500, 510. 3(3-0) F. Homo- 
geneous and heterogeneous nucleation, spinodal decomposition, interface and diffusion- 
controlled growth, formal theory of transformation kinetics, growth of crystals from the 
vapor, precipitation, coarsening, order-disorder, and martensitic transformations. 

MAT (CH) 507 Chemical Concepts in Materials Science and Engineering. Preq.: CI. 
3(3-0) F. Structure, symmetry and chemical bonding; spectroscopic methods and their 
utilization in trace analysis and pollution control; phase equilibria, crystal growth and 
materials purification; vapor phase equilibria and the kinetics of chemical reactions and 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 223 

transport; electrochemical thermodynamics and kinetics with applications to batteries, 
solar cells, electrorefinement, plating and corrosion processes. 

MAT 508 Thermodynamics of Materials. Preq.: MAT 301 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A 
review of the first and second laws of thermodynamics, equilibrium and irreversible 
processes, open and closed systems, partition functions and particle distribution functions. 
Applications include extension of the thermodynamic potentials to situations where elec- 
trical, magnetic and stress fields are present, heat capacity of crystals, electron gas in 
metals, solution models, binary phase diagrams and rubber elasticity in polymers. 

MAT 510 Elements of Crystallography and Diffraction. Preq.: MAT 411. 3(3-0) F. 
Crystal symmetry, lattices and space groups; elementary diffraction by crystalline matter; 
experimental methods of x-ray diffraction. 

MAT 511 Stereology and Image Analysis. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Development of principles and their practical application to measurement of images from 
microscopy (primarily materials) to describe three-dimensional structure of specimens 
viewed in transverse sections or projection. Includes basic statistics, manual and automatic 
(computerized) image analysis methods. Basic stereological parameters (volume fraction, 
surface density, curvature) plus object size and shape parameters, fractal and stereoscopic 
description of surfaces. 

MAT 512 Scanning Electron Microscopy. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Electron 
optics, sources and detectors. Beam specimen interactions, secondary and backscattered 
electrons, EDS and WDS. Resolution limits, experimental conditions, related techniques, 
beam-induced damage and materials modification. 

MAT 515 Fundamentals of Transmission Electron Microscopy. Preq.: MAT 510 or 
equivalent. 3(2-3) S. Electron optics, electron solid interactions, basic electronic diffraction, 
contrast from amorphous materials, diffraction contrast, defect characterization, intro- 
duction to analytical electron microscopy. Laboratory experiments illustrating these 
concepts. 

MAT (NE) 525 Nuclear Materials. 3(3-0) F. (See nuclear engineering.) 

MAT 529 Properties of High Temperature Materials. Pre^s./MylT^Oi and MA T50^. 

3(3-0) S. Effects of temperature on the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of 
inorganic materials; relationships between microstructure and high temperature proper- 
ties; applications of ceramics, metals and composites at elevated temperatures. 

MAT (MAE) 53 1 Materials Processing by Deformation. 3(3-0) F. (See mechanical and 
aerospace engineering.) 

MAT (MAE) 532 Fundamentals of Metal Machining Theory. 3(3-0) S. (See mechani- 
cal and aerospace engineering.) 

MAT 533 Advanced Ceramic Engineering Design. Preq.: MAT U7. 3(2-3) F. 
Advanced studies in analysis and design of ceramic products, processes and systems 
leading to original solutions of current industrial problems and the development of new 
concepts of manufacturing. 

MAT 540 Glass Technology. /'reg'..-AfAr .455. 3(3-0) F. Fundamentals of glass manufac- 
ture including compositions, properties and application of the principal types of commer- 
cial glasses. 

MAT 541 Principles of Corrosion. Preqs.: MAT 201 and CH431 or MAT 301. 3(2-3) F. 
The fundamentals of metallic corrosion and passivity. The electro-chemical nature of 
corrosive attack, basic forms of corrosion, corrosion rate factors, methods of corrosion 
protection. Laboratory work included. 



224 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MAT 556 Composite Materials. Preq.: MAT U50. 3(3-0) F. Basic principles underlying 
the properties of composite materials as related to properties of the individual constituents 
and their interactions. Emphasis on the design of composite systems to yield desired 
combinations of properties. 

MAT 560 Materials Science and Processing of Semiconductor Devices. Preq.: MAT 
Jt60. 3(3-0) S. Alt yrs. Ion implantationanddopingof semiconductor devices, thin films and 
epitaxy, silicides, ohmic contacts and interconnection metallurgy, oxidation and nitrida- 
tion, gettering of impurities and dopant segregation phenomena, electromigration, elec- 
tronic packaging materials science, advanced device concepts. 

MAT (TC) 561 Organic Chemistry of Polymers. 3(3-0) S. (See textile chemistry.) 

MAT (TC) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Bulk Properties. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. (See textile chemistry.) 

MAT (NE) 573 Computer Experiments in Materials and Nuclear Engineering. 

Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Monte Carlo and dynamical computer 
experiments covered from the standpoint of how to design and use them in materials and 
nuclear engineering work. 

MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing. 1-3. 
Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific experimental project dealing with 
materials. A seminar period provided and a written report required. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MAT 610 Advanced Crystallography and Diffraction. Preq.: MAT 510. 3(3-0) F. 
Symmetry in crystals and space group determination. Kinematic and dynamical scattering 
theories. Experimental methods involving single crystals. Image formation in x-ray topo- 
graphy and electron microscopy. Disorder and defects. Methods of crystal structure analy- 
sis. Residual stresses and preferred orientation in polycrystals. 

MAT 612 Advanced Scanning Electron Microscopy and Surface Analysis. Preq.: 
MAT 512 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Beam specimen interactions, voltage contrast, 
electron spectrometers, stroboscopy, EBIC, cathodoluminescence, channeling, backscat- 
tering, magnetic contrast, vacuum science, instrumentation, ion sputtering. Auger elec- 
tron spectroscopy, SIMS, quantitative EDS, ESCA, FIM, STM. 

MAT 621 Theory and Structure of Amorphous Materials. Preq.: MA T 500. 3(3-0) S. 
Bond types and structure of amorphous solids, relations of bond types and structure to flow 
mechanisms, electrical, optical and thermal properties. 

MAT 622 Theory and Structure of Ceramic Materials. Preq.: MAT 500. 3(3-0) F. 
Electrical and optical properties of non-conducting materials, ferro-electric behavior and 
materials parameters, magnetic properties of non-metallics, semi-conducting materials. 

MAT 623 Theory and Structure of Metallic Materials. Preq.: MAT 500. 3(3-0) F. The 
metallic state, its atomic and electronic structure. Electron theory of metals and alloys. 
Advanced methods of determining electronic structure in metallic materials. Solid solu- 
tions and intermediate phases, superconducting and magnetic alloys. 

MAT 630 Phase Transformation in Materials II. Preqs.: MAT 510, 530, 550. 3(3-0) F. 
Formal theories of solid-solid transformations, transformation mechanisms, transforma- 
tion morphologies. 

MAT 631 Thin Film and Coating Science and Technology I. Preq.: MAT 500. 3(3-0) F. 
Vacuum science and technology including gas kinetics, gas flow calculations, system 
design and the use of various pumps, materials and components. Atomistics of solid sur- 
faces. Nucleation and growth of films and coatings. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 225 

MAT 632 Thin Film and Coating Science and Technology II. Preq.: MAT 631. 3(3-0) 
S. Alt yrs. Techniques for thin films and coatings deposition and their applications. Inter- 
faces, adhesion and surface modification. Artifically structured and chemically modulated 
layered materials. Pseudomorphic structures. Characterization of thin films and coatings. 

MAT 633 Advanced Mechanical Properties of Materials. Preq.: MAT 630. 3(3-0) F. 
The theories of yield strength, work hardening, creep, fracture and fatigue of crystalline 
materials developed in terms of dislocation theory. 

MAT 660 Defects, Diffusion and Ion Implantation in Semiconductors. Preq.: MAT 
501 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Alt yrs. Thermodynamics of vacancies and interstitials, defect 
complexes, electronic defects, defect annealing processes, self diffusion, dopant and impur- 
ity diffusion, substitutional/interstitial diffusion, diffusion in amorphous solids, electro- 
transport, fundamentals of ion-solid interactions, atomic structure of defects, damage 
annealing processes, supersaturated alloys, laser annealing, ion beam mixing phenomena. 

MAT (CH, TC) 662 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Solution Properties. 

3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See textile chemistry.) 

MAT 691, 692 Advanced Topics in Materials Science and Engineering. Preq.: Grad. 
standing. 1-3. Special studies of advanced topics in materials engineering. 

MAT 695 Materials Science and Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Reports and dis- 
cussion of special topics in materials engineering and allied fields. 

MAT 699 Materials Science and Engineering Research. Credits Arranged. Inde- 
pendent investigation of an appropriate research problem. A report on this investigation 
required as a graduate thesis. 

Mathematics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. H. Martin Jr., Head 

Associate Professor: J. E. Franke, (Graduate Administrator 

Professors: J . W. Bishir, E. E. Burniston, S. L. Campbell, R. E. Chandler, E. N. 
Chukwu, L. 0. Chung, J. M. A. Danby, J. C. Dunn, M. J. Evans, A. Fauntleroy, 
R. 0. Fulp, R. E. Hartwig. C. T. Kelley, K. Koh, J. Luh, J. A. Marlin, L. B. 
Martin Jr., C. D. Meyer, N. K. Nichols, C. V. Pao, E. L. Peterson, R. J. 
Plemmons, M. S. Putcha, H. Sagan, J. F. Belgrade, M. Shearer, C. E. Siewert, 
M. F. Singer, E. L. Stitzinger, R. E. White; Prof essors Emeriti: R. C. Bullock, J. 
M. Clarkson, W. J. Harrington, J. Levine, H. M. Nahikian, P. A. Nickel, H. V. 
Park, N. J. Rose, R. A. Struble, J. B. Wilson; Associate Professors: M. T. Chu, J. 
D. Cohen, G. D. Faulkner, D. E. Garoutte, T. J. Lada, D. M. Latch, L. K. Norris, 
L. B. Page, R. T. Ramsay, J. Rodriguez, S. Schecter, R. Silber, J. W. Silverstein, 
D. F. Ullrich; Assistant Professors: H. J. Charlton, R. Haas, D. J. Hansen, A. G. 
Helminck, A. Kheyfets, K. C. Misra, B. Moro, S. 0. Paur, J. L. Rulla, S. J. 
Wright 

The Department of Mathematics offers programs leading to the degrees of 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy with a major in either mathematics 
or applied mathematics. 



226 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Applicants for admission should have an undergraduate degree in mathemat- 
ics or its equivalent. This should include a year of mathematical analysis (or 
advanced calculus) and a year of modern algebra, including linear algebra. All 
applicants are advised to take the Graduate Record Examination including the 
Advanced Test in Mathematics. 

A number of teaching assistantships are available. A student carrying a half- 
time assistantship is allowed to carry a course load of nine semester hours. 

The requirements for the Master of Science degree include 36 semester hours 
of approved credits and a comprehensive examination. A master's project for 3 
hours credit is required. Foreign languages are not required for the master's 
degree. 

There is no prescribed minimum number of courses for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. Normally a student will take approximately 60 semester hours of 
course credits including certain core courses in algebra, analysis and applied 
mathematics. Independent reading and participation in seminars constitute an 
indispensable part of the doctoral program. 

All doctoral students are required to have a reading knowledge of one modern 
foreign language. Comprehensive examinations are also required. These consist 
of a written examination designed to test basic knowledge and oral and written 
examinations on material related to the field of proposed thesis work. 

The heart of the doctoral program is the dissertation. It must be original 
research resulting in a significant contribution in some area of mathematics or 
its applications and should be worthy of publication in the current literature. The 
doctoral dissertation must be defended at the final oral examination. 

Computational mathematics (CMA) is a plan of study which is attached to the 
graduate program in applied mathematics. Its emphasis is on numerical analysis 
with components of computer science and applications to engineering and the 
sciences. There is a rich collection of graduate-level numerical analysis course 
work and over 15 mathematics faculty involved in CMA. Their expertise includes 
numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, optimization, 
structures, symbolic computations, integral equations, transport theory, compu- 
tational fluids, numerical linear algebra, numerical control and probabilistic 
computations. Many of the faculty have current research projects dealing with 
parallel algorithms and their implementation on advanced computing architec- 
tures. Computing facilities include the state-of-the-art multiprocessing/vector 
Alliant FX/40 and Cray Y-MP supercomputers, and the multiprocessing 
Sequent computer. Prospective CMA students should have additional under- 
graduate course work, or equivalent experience, in differential equations, 
numerical analysis with FORTRAN and a year of computer science (computer 
organization, assembler language and data structures). 

A detailed statement of requirements for graduate degrees is available on 
request from the graduate administrator. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations IL Preq.:MA 301. CreditforbothMA AOl and 

MA 501 irill not be given. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra. Preq.: MA 225. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 227 

MA 405 Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices. Preq.: One yr. of calculus. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. 

MA 407 Introduction to Modern Algebra for Mathematics Majors. Preq.: MA 225. 
Credit is not allowed for MA W3 and MA W3M. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MA 408 Foundations of Euclidean Geometry. Preq.: MA 225 or MA (CSC) 322. 3(3-0) 

S. 

MA 410 Theory of Numbers. Preq.: One yr. of calculus. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 414 Introduction to Differential Geometry. Preqs.: MA 202 and A05. 3(3-0) S. 

MA (CSC) 416 Introduction to Combinatorics. Preq.: MA U03 or CSC 322. 3(3-0) F. 

MA 421 Introduction to Probability. Preq.: One yr. of calculus. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I. Preq.: MA 202 (MA W3 desirable). 3(3-0) F,S. 

MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II. Preqs.: MA U25 and MA W5. 3(3-0) S. 

MA (CSC) 427 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I. Preqs.: MA 301 and a program- 
ming language proficiency. 3(3-0) F. 

MA (CSC) 428 Introduction to Numerical Analysis II. Preqs.: MA U05 and program- 
ming language proficiency. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 430 Mathematical Models in the Physical Sciences. Preqs.: MA 301 and MA W5. 

3(3-0) F. 

MA 432 Mathematical Models in Life Sciences and Social Sciences. Preqs.: MA 301, 
MA W5; Coreq.: MA U21 or ST 371. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 433 History of Mathematics. Preq.: One yr. of calculus. 3(3-0) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 501 Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists I. Preq.: MA 301 or 

equivalent. Credit for this course and MA UOl is not allowed. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Survey of 
mathematical methods for engineers and scientists. Ordinary differential equations and 
Green's functions; partial differential equations and separation of variables; special func- 
tions, Fourier series. Applications to engineering and science. This course cannot be taken 
for credit by mathematics majors. 

MA 502 Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists II. Preq.: MA 301 or 
equivalent. A ny student receiving credit for MA 502 may receive credit for, at most, one of the 
following: MA U05, MA 512, MA 513. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Determinants and matrices; line and 
surface integrals, integral theorems; complex integrals and residues; distribution func- 
tions of probability. This course cannot be taken for credit by mathematics majors. 

MA (IE, OR) 505 Linear Programming. 3(3-0) F,S. (See industrial engineering.) 

MA 507 Analysis for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,Sum. Alt. 
yrs. A course designed to update and broaden the secondary teacher's capability and 
point-of-view with respect to topics in analysis. Historical development, logical refinement 
and applications of concepts such as limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. This 
course may be taken for graduate credit for certificate renewal by secondary school 
teachers. Credit towards a graduate degree may be allowed only for students in mathemat- 
ics education. 



228 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MA 508 Geometry for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. 
yrs. A course designed to study topics in geometry of concern to secondary teachers in their 
work and to provide background and enrichment. Various approaches to the study of 
geometry, including vector geometry, transformational geometry and axiomatics. This 
course may be taken for graduate credit and for certificate renewal by secondary school 
teachers. Credit towards a graduate degree may be allowed only for students in mathemat- 
ics education. 

MA 509 Abstract Algebra for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) 
F.Sum. Alt. .vr.s. A course designed to investigate from an advanced viewpoint topics in 
algebra from the high school curriculum. Theory of equations, polynomial rings, rational 
functions and elementary number theory. This course may be taken for graduate credit for 
certificate renewal by secondary school teachers. Credit towards a graduate degree may be 
allowed only for students in mathematics education. 

MA 510 Selected Topics in Mathematics for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Grad. stand- 
ing. 3(3-0) S.Sum. Alt. yrs. A course designed to cover various topics in mathematics of 
concern to secondary teachers. Topics selected from areas such as mathematics of finance, 
probability, statistics, linear programming and theory of games, intuitive topology, recrea- 
tional math, computers and applications of mathematics. This course may be taken for 
graduate credit for certification renewal by secondary school teachers. Credit towards a 
graduate degree may be allowed only for students in mathematics education. 

MA 51 1 Advanced Calculus I. Preq.: MA 301. May not be taken for credit by undergrad. 
mathematics majors. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Fundamental theorems on continuous functions; 
convergence theory of sequences, series and integrals; the Riemann integral. 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II. Preq.: MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. General theorems of 
partial differentiation; implicit function theorems; vector calculus in 3-space; line and 
surface integrals; classical integral theorems. 

MA 513 Introduction to Complex Variables. Preq.: MA 21^2. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Opera- 
tions with complex numbers, derivatives, analytic functions, integrals, definitions and 
properties of elementary functions, multivalued functions, power series, residue theory and 
applications, conformal mapping. 

MA 514 Methods of Applied Mathematics. Preg..- MA 511 orJt25. 3(3-0) S. Introduction 
to integral equations, the calculus of variations and difference equations. 

MA 515 Real Analysis. Preq.: MA U26. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to advanced analysis. 
Measurable sets and functions; Lebesgue measure; Riemann and Lebesque integrals; 
Fatou's lemma; monotone and Lebesque convergence theorems; differentiation and inte- 
gration; functions of bounded variation; absolute continuity; LP spaces; Holder and Min- 
kowski inequalities; convergence and completeness; approximation by steps and continu- 
ous functions. 

MA 517 Introduction to Topology. Preq.: MA ^26. 3(3-0) F. Sets and functions, metric 
spaces, topological spaces, compactness, separation, connectedness. 

MA 518 Calculus on Manifolds. Preq.: MA A26. 3(3-0) S. Calculus of several variables 
from a modern viewpoint. Differential and integral calculus of several variables, vector 
functions, integration of manifolds, Stokes' and Green's theorems, vector analysis. 

MA 520 Linear Algebra. Preq.: MA It05. 3(3-0) F. Vector spaces, linear mappings and 
matrices, determinants, inner product spaces, bilinear and quadratic forms, canonical 
forms, spectral theorem. 

MA 521 Fundamentals of Modern Algebra. Preqs.: MA U07 and 520. 3(3-0) S. Groups, 
normal subgroups, quotient groups, Cayley's theorem, Sylow's theorem. Rings, ideals and 
quotient rings, polynomial rings. Fields, extension fields, elements of Galois theory. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 229 

MA 524 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences I. Preqs.: MA U05, 511 and 
either MA Wl or 501. 3(3-0} F. Green's functions and two-point boundary value problems; 
elementary theory of distributions; generalized Green's functions. Finite and infinite 
dimensional inner product spaces; Hilbert spaces; completely continuous operators; inte- 
gral equations: the Fredholm alternative; eigenfunction expansions; applications to poten- 
tial theory. Nonsingular and singular Sturm-Liouville problems; Weil's theorem. 

MA 525 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences II. Preq.: MA 52U. 3(3-0) S. 
Distribution theory in n-space; Fourier transforms; partial differential equations, general- 
ized solutions, fundamental solutions, Cauchy problem, wave and heat equations, well-set 
problems. Laplace's equation, the Dirichlet and Neumann problems, integral equations of 
potential theory. Green's functions, eigenfunction expansions. 

MA (CSC) 529 Numerical Analysis I. Preqs.: MA 405, MA 511, high level computer 
language. 3(3-0) F. For students in the engineering, physical and mathematical sciences. 
Illustrates algorithm behavior and applicability. Topics include the effect of roundoff 
errors, systems of linear equations and direct methods, least squares via Givens and 
Householder transformations, iterative methods, convergence for SOR with symmetric 
positive definite matrices, the conjugate gradient method, eigenvalue problems, Newton's 
method, initial value problems and partial differential equations. 

MA (CSC) 530 Numerical Analysis II. Preq.: MA 529. 3(3-0) S. Topics include approxi- 
mation, quadrature, Newton's method, roots of polynomials, minimization problems, ordi- 
nary differential equations with boundary conditions and variational methods. 

MA (E, OR) 531 Dynamic Systems and Multivariable Control 1. 3(3-0) F. (See opera- 
tions research.) 

MA 532 Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations. Preqs.: MA 301, U05, advanced 
calculus. 3(3-0) S. Existence and uniqueness theorems, systems of linear equations, funda- 
mental matrices, matrix exponential, nonlinear systems, plane autonomous systems, stabil- 
ity theory. 

MA 534 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations. Preqs.: MA J^25 or MA 511, 
MA 301. 3(3-0) F. Theory of characteristics and classification of second order equations, 
existence, uniqueness and representation of solutions for the wave equation, Dirichlet and 
Neumann boundary-value problems for the Laplace equation, potential theory in two and 
higher dimensional domains, mean-value theorem and the maximum principle. Green's 
identities, initial boundary-value problems of heat equation and wave equation. Maximum 
principle of parabolic equation, method of eigenfunction expansions, Fourier series and 
Fourier transforms. 

MA (ST) 541 Theory of Probability I. Preq.: MA 425 or 511. 3(3-0) F,Sum. Axioms, 
combinatorial analysis, conditional probability, independence, random variables, expecta- 
tion, special discrete and continuous distributions, probability and moment generating 
functions, central limit theorem, laws of large numbers, branching processes, recurrent 
events, random walk. 

MA (ST) 542 Introduction to Stochastic Processes. 3(3-0) S. (See statistics.) 

MA 545 Set Theory and Foundations of Mathematics. Preq.: MA W7. 3(3-0) S. Logic 
and the axiomatic approach, the Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms and other systems, algebra of 
sets and order relations, equivalents of the Axiom of Choice, one-to-one correspondences, 
cardinal and ordinal numbers, the Continuum Hypothesis. 

MA (PY) 555 Mathematical Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. Preq.: MA 301. 
3(3-0) F. Central orbits, N-body problem, 3-body problem, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, pertur- 
bation theory, applications to motion of celestial bodies. 



230 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MA (PY) 556 Orbital Mechanics. Preqs.: MA 301, W5, knowledge of elementary mechan- 
ics and computer programming. 3(3-0) S. Keplerian motion, iterative solutions, numerical 
integration, differential corrections and space navigation, elements of probability, least 
squares, sequential estimation. Kalman filter. 

MA (BMA, ST) 571 Biomathematics I. 3(3-0) F. (See biomathematics.) 

MA (BMA, ST) 572 Biomathematics II. 3(3-0) S. (See biomathematics.) 

MA 581 Special Topics. Preq.: Consent of department. 1-6 F,S. 

MA (CSC) 583 Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations. Preq.: MA 
512. 3(3-0) S. Numerical methods for initial value problems including predictor-corrector, 
Runge-Kutta, hybrid and extrapolation methods; stiff systems; shooting methods for two- 
point boundary value problems; weak, absolute and relative stability results. 

MA (CSC) 584 Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations— Finite Dif- 
ference Methods. Preqs.: MA .501; knowledge of a high level programming language. 3(3-0) 
F. A survey of finite difference methods for partial differential equations including elliptic, 
parabolic and hyperbolic PDE's. Both linear and nonlinear problems are considered. 
Theoretical foundations are described; however, emphasis is placed on algorithm design 
and implementation. 

MA (CSC, OR) 585 Graph Theory. 3(3-0) F. (See computer science.) 

MA (IE, OR) 586 Network Flows. 3(2-2) S. (See industrial engineering.) 

MA (CSC) 587 Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations— Finite Ele- 
ment Method. Preqs.: MA .501; knowledge of a high level programming language. 3(3-0) S. 
An introduction to the finite element method. Applications to both linear and nonlinear 
elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations. Theoretical foundations described; 
however, emphasis placed on algorithm design and implementation. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MA 600 Advanced Differential Equations I. Preqs.: MA 513, 518, 520. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Analytical theory of ordinary differential equations, stability theory, perturbations, 
asymptotic behavior, nonlinear oscillations. 

MA 601 Advanced Differential Equations II. Preq.: MA 600. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Qualita- 
tive theory of ordinary differential equations, general properties of dynamical systems, 
limit sets, integral invariants, global theory. 

MA 602 Partial Differential Equations I. Preqs.: MA 1^26, 520, 532 or 600. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Linear second order parabolic, elliptic and hyperbolic equations, initial and boundary 
value problems, strong maximum principles, variational and approximation methods, 
iterative methods for boundary value problems. 

MA 603 Partial Differential Equations II. Preq.: MA 602. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Nonlinear 
initial and boundary value problems, existence and uniqueness theorems, qualitative anal- 
ysis and stability theory, comparison and approximation methods, numerical methods and 
error analysis. 

MA 604 Topology. Preqs.: MA 515, 520. 3(3-0) S. Topological spaces: separation axioms, 
compactness, connectedness, local topological properties; continuous mappings and con- 
vergence; product and quotient spaces; compactification; homotopy equivalence of map- 
pings, fundamental groups, covering spaces, universal coverings, deck transformations. 

MA (ST, OR) 606 Nonlinear Programming. 3(3-0) S. (See statistics.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 231 

MA (NE) 607 Exact and Approximate Solutions in Particle Transport Theory. 

Preq.: MA 501 or MA 511. 3(3-0) S. The method of elementary solutions used to solve exactly 
basic problems in neutron-transport theory and related topics. In addition, the Fn method 
developed and used to establish concise approximate solutions in the realm of particle 
transport theory. 

MA (BMA, OR, ST) 610 Stochastic Modeling. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See biomathematics.) 

MA 61 1 Analytic Function Theory I. Preq.: MA A26. 3(3-0) F. A rigorous introduction to 
the theory of functions of a complex variable. The complex plane, functions, Mobius 
transformations, the exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, infi- 
nite series, integration in the complex plane, Cauchy's theorem and its consequences. 

MA 612 Analytic Function Theory II. Preq.: MA 611. 3(3-0) S. A continuation of MA 
611. Taylor and Laurent series. The residue theorem, the argument principle, harmonic 
functions and the Dirichlet problem, analytic continuation and the monodromy theorem, 
entire and meromorphic functions, the Weierstrass product representation and the Mittag- 
Leffler partial fraction representation, special functions, conformal mapping and the 
Picard theorem. 

MA 613 Techniques of Complex Analysis. Preq.: MA 513 or 611. 3(3-0) S. A course 
dealing with the applications of complex analysis to mathematical problems in physical 
science in the setting of the potential equation and other partial differential equations: 
contour integrals, special functions of mathematical physics from the line integral point of 
view, solution of problems in potential theory, asymptotic methods including WKB and 
Wiener-Hopf techniques. 

MA (OR) 614 Integer Programming. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See operations research.) 

MA (ST) 617, 618 Measure Theory and Advanced Probability. 3(3-0) F,S. (See 
statistics.) 

MA 620 Modern Algebra I. Preq.: MA 521. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. A study of groups, rings 
and modules. Elements of homology. Polynomials, Noetherian rings, Algebraic extensions, 
Galois theory. 

MA 621 Modern Algebra II. Preq.: MA 620. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A study of linear maps, 
bilinear forms, representations, multilinear products, semisimplicity and the representa- 
tion of finite groups. 

MA 622 Linear Transformations and Matrix Theory. Preq.: MA U05. 3(3-0) F. Vector 
spaces, linear transformations and matrices, orthogonality, orthogonal transformations 
with emphasis on rotations and reflections, matrix norms, projectors, least squares, gener- 
alized inverses, definite matrices, singular values. 

MA 623 Theory of Matrices and Applications. Preq.: MA 520 or 622. 3(3-0) S. Canoni- 
cal forms, functions of matrices, variational methods, perturbation theory, numerical 
methods, nonnegative matrices, applications to differential equations, Markov chains. 

MA 626 Algebraic Topology. Preq.: MA 605. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Simplicial and singular 
homology and cohomology, the Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms, duality, cohomology opera- 
tions; higher homotopy groups, Hurewicz homomorphisms. 

MA (OR) 629 Vector Space Methods in System Optimization. 3(3-0) F. (See operations 
research.) 

MA (E, OR) 631 Dynamic Systems and Multivariable Control II. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
(See operations research.) 



232 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MA 632 Operational Mathematics I. Preq.: MA 513 or 61 1. 3(3-0) F. Laplace transforms 
with theory and application to ordinary and partial differential equations arising from 
problems in engineering and physics. 

MA 633 Operational Mathematics IL Preq.: MA 632. 3(3-0) S. Extended development 
of the Laplace and Fourier transforms and their application to the solution of ordinary and 
partial differential equations, integral equations and difference equations; Z-transforms, 
other infinite and finite transforms and their applications. 

MA 637 Differentiable Manifolds. Preqs.: MA AGS, 521; Coreq.: MA 60U. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. An introduction to the topology and geometry of differentiable manifolds, multilinear 
algebra, exterior differential forms, differentiable manifolds, theory of connexions, Rie- 
mannian manifolds. 

MA 647 Functional Analysis I. Preq.: MA 515. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Banach spaces; linear 
functional; linear operators, uniform boundedness, open mapping and closed graph theo- 
rems: dual spaces; weak topologies. 

MA 648 Functional Analysis IL Preq.: MA 61f7. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Advanced topics in 
functional analysis such as linear topological spaces; Banach algebra, spectral theory and 
abstract measure theory and integration. 

MA 661 Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis L Preq.: MA A26 or 512. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. Concepts of classical and modern differential geometry presented from the point of 
view of tensor analysis and differential forms. Topics to include: theory of curves, tensor 
analysis and differential forms, intrinsic geometry of surfaces, Riemannian geometry. 

MA 662 Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis IL Preq.: MA 661. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Continuation of MA 661. 

MA (CSC) 672 Advanced Numerical Linear Algebra. Preq.: MA 529. 3(3-0) S. 
Mathematical and numerical investigation of direct, iterative and semi-interative methods 
for the solution of linear systems. Singular algebraic systems and least squares computa- 
tions. Methods for the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors presented. Careful 
mathematical analysis of these techniques given. 

MA (CSC) 673 Parallel Algorithms and Scientific Computation. Preq.: MA 529. S. 
Multiprocessing and supercomputer architectures including Alliant FX/8, IBM 3090 VF- 
600, CRAY XMP-48, Intel iPCS and BBN Butterfly. The implementation of standard 
numerical linear algebra algorithms on vector and multiprocessing computers. Portability 
of codes from one computer to another. Typical applications to science and engineering. 

MA (CSC) 674 Nonlinear Equations and Unconstrained Optimization. Preq.: MA 
529. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Newton's method and Quasi-Newton methods for nonlinear equations 
and optimization problems, globally convergent extensions, methods for sparse problems, 
applications to differential equations, integral equations and general minimization prob- 
lems. Methods appropriate for boundary value problems. 

MA 681 Special Topics in Real Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 682 Special Topics in Complex Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 683 Special Topics in Algebra. 1-6. 

MA 684 Special Topics in Combinatorial Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 685 Special Topics in Numerical Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 686 Special Topics in Topology. 1-6. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 233 

MA 687 Special Topics in Geometry. 1-6. 
MA 688 Special Topics in Differential Equations. 1-6. 
MA 689 Special Topics in Applied Mathematics. 1-6. 

The subject matter in the special topics courses varies from year to year. The 
topics and instructors are announced well in advance by the department. 

MA (IE, OR) 692 Special Topics in Mathematical Programming. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
(See industrial engineering.) 

MA 697 Master's Project. 3(3-0} F,S,Sum.. Investigation of some topic in mathematics to 
a deeper and broader extent than typically done in a classroom situation. For the applied 
mathematics student the topic usually consists of a realistic application of mathematics to 
the student's minor area. A written and oral report on the project required. 

MA 699 Research. Credits Arranged. Individual research in mathematics. 

Mathematics and Science Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see mathe- 
matics and science education under education. 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. A. Bailey, Head 

Professor J. N. Perkins, Associate Department Head (Aerospace Engineering) 

Professor J. A. Edwards, Associate Department Head (Mechanical Engineering) 

Professor J. C. Mulligan, (Graduate Administrator 

Professors: E. M. Afify, F. R. DeJarnette, T. A. Dow, W. C. Griffith, F. D. Hart, H. 
A. Hassan, T. H. Hodgson, C. J. Maday, M. N. Ozisik, L. H. Royster, F. 0. 
Smetana, F. Y. Sorrell, J. S. Strenkowski, C. F. Zorowski; Visiting Professor: 
M. M. Fikry; Adjunct Professors: R. L. Bradow, C. T. Crowe, D. E. Klett, E. R. 
McClure, R. A. Whisnant; Prof essors Emeriti: R. A. Burton, M. H. Clayton, J. S. 
Doolittle, B. H. Garcia Jr., F. J. Hale, J. K. Whitfield, J. Woodburn; Associate 
Professors: M. A. Boles, A. C. Eberhardt, H. M. Eckerlin, R. R. Johnson, R. F. 
Keltie, C. Kleinstreuer, J. W. Leach, D. S. McRae, R. T. Nagel, S. Torquato; 
Adjunct Associate Prof essors: i . P. Archie Jr., R. W. Barnwell, J. F. Campbell, 
P. B. Corson, D. L. Dwoyer, R. M. Hall, K. R. Iyer. D. W. Lee. D. L. Margolis, H. 
Singh, J. S. Stewart; Assistant Professors: G. V. Candler, J. W. David, J. W. 
Eischen, R. D. Gould, E. C. Klang, P. L H. Ro, L. M. Silverberg, C. E. Spieker- 
mann; Visiting Assistant Professor: N. Chokani; Adjunct Assistant Professors: 
J. P. Coulter, C. C. Daniel HI, J. A. Daggerhart, P. A. Gnoffo, J. H. Hebrank, A. 
L. Patra, W. J. Yanta 



234 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL ADJUNCT GRADUATE FACULTY 
S. Chandra, P. H. DeHoff 

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering offers graduate 
study leading to the Master of Mechanical Engineering, Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Entrance to the degree programs is based upon 
superior performance in a pertinent, accredited baccalaureate degree program. 

Graduate study and research are available in the following areas: 

(1) thermal sciences including classical and statistical thermodynamics, 
energy conservation and conversion, solar energy, alternative energy sources, 
heat and mass transfer; energy systems; 

(2) sound and vibration technology including acoustic radiation, industrial 
and community noise control, transportation noise and hearing conservation, 
acoustic signal processing and computer vibration analysis; 

(3) gas dynamics including subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic 
aerodynamics, lasers, plasmagasdynamics and combustion; 

(4) computational fluid dynamics for inviscid flows, boundary layers and 
parabolized and complete Navier-Stokes equations for external and internal 
flows, grid generation; 

(5) aerospace sciences including aeroelasticity, stability and control and aero- 
space propulsion; aerospace structures; 

(6) mechanical sciences including machine vibrations, mechanical transients, 
materials processing, photoelasticity and experimental stress analysis, finite 
element analysis and transportation systems and vehicle safety; automatic con- 
trol of active structures; design optimization; 

(7) mechanical design, precision engineering and tribology; 

(8) computer-aided design with dedicated graphics work stations, advanced 
interactive software and a dedicated VAX 11/785 computer. 

Extensive laboratory facilities include subsonic and supersonic wind tunnels; 
extensive sound and vibration laboratories including anechoic chambers, a large 
reverberation room, a machinery noise laboratory with field test and analysis 
instrumentation, a signal processing laboratory, a computer graphics and vibra- 
tion analysis laboratory using a Nicolet 6602 structural analysis system and a 
Tektronix 4114 terminal for finite-element analysis, a materials processing 
laboratory; an experimental stress analysis and photoelasticity laboratory; an 
aeroelasticity laboratory; automotive performance and emission control facility; 
a solar energy house and laboratory; a heat transfer laboratory; a precision 
engineering laboratory; and an applied energy research laboratory. 

Computational facilities include VAX 11/785 and IBM 3081 computers, micro 
and array processors, minicomputers, terminals to facilities at NASA Langley 
Research Center and a Cray-2 at MCNC. 

The objective of the department is to provide graduate education both in 
rigorous experimental and theoretical research and practitioner-oriented engi- 
neering design. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 
MAE 403 Air Conditioning. Preq.: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 235 

MAE 404 Refrigeration. Preq.: MAE 302. 3(3-0) S. 
MAE 405 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III. Preq.: MAE 306. 1(0-3) F,S. 

MAE 406 Energy Conservation in Industry. Preqs.: MAE 301 or 307; jr. orsr. statiisin 
engineering. 3(2-3) F. 

MAE 407 Steam and Gas Turbines. Preqs.: MAE 302, MAE 308, or MAE 355. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 408 Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals. Preq.: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 409 Particulate Control in Industrial Atmospheric Pollution. Preq.: MAE 301 
or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 410 Convective Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow. Preqs.: MAE 301, MAE 308. 
3(3-0) F. 

MAE 411 Machine Component Design. Preqs.: MAE 315, 316. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 412 Energy Systems. Preqs.: MAE 302, MAE ilO. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 415 Mechanical Engineering Analysis. Preqs.: MAE 302, 315, 316, EE 331. 
3(3-0) F. 

MAE 416 Mechanical Engineering Design. Preqs.: MAE 302, 315, 316, EE 331. M3-2) 
S. 

MAE 431 Thermodynamics of Compressible Fluid Flow. Preqs.: MAE 301, MA 301, 
MAE 308. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 435 Principles of Automatic Control. Preq.: MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MAE 442 Automotive Engineering. Preq.: Sr. in Engineering. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 452 Aerodynamics of V/STOL Vehicles. Preq.: MAE 355. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 455 Boundary Layer Theory. Preq.: MAE 355. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 456 Computational Methods in Aerodynamics. Preq.: CSC 302 and MAE 455. 

3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 

MAE 462 Flight Vehicle Stability and Control. Preqs.: MAE 261, U35. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 465 Propulsion II. Preq.: MAE 365. M3-3) F. 

MAE 466 Propulsion II Laboratory. Preqs.: MAE 365; MAE 357; Coreq.: MAE 465. 
1(0-3) F. 

MAE 472 Aerospace Vehicle Structures ll.2Preq.: MAE 371. 4(3-3) S. 

MAE 473 Aerospace Vehicle Structure II Laborabory. Preq.: MAE 371; Coreq.: MAE 
472. 1(0-3) S. 

MAE 478 Aerospace Vehicle Design I. Preqs.: MAE 356, 472; Coreqs.: MAE 462, 465. 
2(2-0). F. 

MAE 479 Aerospace Vehicle Design II. Preq.: MAE 478. 3(1-6) S. 

MAE 495 Special Topics in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 1-3 F,S. 



236 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAE 501 Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. Preqs.: MAE 302; MA Wl or 
MA 511. 3(3-0) F. Thermodynamics of a general reactive system; conservation of energy 
and the principles of increase of entropy; the fundamental relation of thermodynamics; 
Legendre transformations; phase transitions and critical phenomena; equilibrium and 
stability criteria in different representation; irreversible thermodynamics. Introduction to 
statistical thermodynamics. 

MAE 503 Advanced Power Plants. Preq.: MAE U12. 3(3-0) F. A critical analysis of the 
energy balance of thermal power plants, thermodynamics and economic evaluation of 
alternate schemes of development; study of recent development in the production of power. 

MAE 504 Fluid Dynamics of Combustion I. Preqs.: MAE 301, MAE 355 or MAE 308. 
3(3-0) F. Gas-phase thermochemistry including chemical equilibrium and introductory 
chemical kinetics. Homogeneous reaction phenomena. Subsonic and supersonic combus- 
tion waves in premixed reactants (deflagration and detonation). Effects of turbulence. 
Introduction to diffusion flame theory. 

MAE 505 Heat Transfer Theory and Applications. Preq.: MAE UIO or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F. Development of basic equations for steady and transient heat and mass transfer 
processes. Emphasis placed on the application of the basic equations to engineering prob- 
lems in the areas of conduction, convection, mass transfer and thermal radiation. 

MAE 506 Advanced Automotive Energy Systems. Preq.: MAE U08. 3(3-0) S. A critical 
study of the various cycles and energy systems for automotive transportation carried out. 
The feasibility of automotive Rankine cycle power plants, Sterling engines, gas turbines 
and hydrogen-air fueled engines discussed. Means of improving the efficiency and exhaust 
emissions of internal combustion engines and the use of alternative fuel sources considered. 

MAE 510 Effects of Noise and Vibration on Man. Preq.: MA 301. 3(3-0) F. Study of 
effects of noise and vibration and design criteria available to establish acceptability of 
environments. Study of auditory and non-auditory response to noise and models available 
for predicting responses. Guidelines presented for designing equipment and environments 
to meet existing ANSI, ISO, ASTM and HVAC standards. Practical experience in using 
noise-vibration equipment. 

MAE 513 Principles of Structural Vibration. Preq.: MAE 315. 3(3-0) F. Principles of 
structural vibration beginning from single and multi-degree of freedom systems and 
extending to distributed systems. Forced system response, vibration of strings, bars, shafts 
and beams and an introduction to approximate methods. 

MAE 514 Noise and Vibration Control. Preq.: MAE 315. 3(3-0) S. Discussion of noise 
and vibration design criteria. Presentation of noise and vibration survey procedures. 
Discussion of the noise and vibration control model. Review of most common equipment 
noise sources and ways to achieve adequate control. Room acoustics, acoustics of walls, 
enclosures, vibration isolation and use of scale models are examples of topics covered 
during the course. 

MAE 517 Instrumentation in Sound and Vibration Engineering. Preq.: ECE 331; 
Coreq.: MAE 513. 3(3-0) S. This course devoted to a presentation of measurement tech- 
niques and the theory and operation of transducers and amplifiers. An introduction to 
signal analysis techniques such as power spectral density and correlation also provided. 

MAE 518 Acoustic Radiation I. Preqs.: MA 301 and MAE308orMAE 356. 3(3-0) F. An 
introduction to the principles of acoustic radiation from vibrating bodies and their related 
fields. The radiation of simple sources, the propagation of sound waves in confined spaces 
and transmission through different media considered. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 237 

MAE 519 Theory of Noise in Transportation Systems. Preq.: MAE 550. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of the basic noise generating mechanisms encountered in transportation systems. 
Coverage includes jet noise, propeller noise, helicopter noise, fan and compressor noise, 
aircraft induced community noise, surface vehicle noise models and efforts to control noise 
in transportation systems. 

MAE (IE) 520 Industrial Robotics. 3(3-0) F. (See industrial engineering.) 

MAE 524 FrmciplesoiStruciura.\Coniro\. Preq.: MAE 315; Coreq.: MAE 513. 3(3-0) F. 
Principles of structural control beginning with single and two-degree of freedom systems 
and extending to distributed systems. State feedback, disturbance rejection, mode cou- 
pling, state estimation, pole placement. Applications to civil structures, path following in 
robotic structures, suspensions in automotive structures, flight control systems in aircraft 
structures and attitude control in space structures. 

MAE 525 Advanced Flight Vehicle Stability and Control. Preq.: MAE A62. 3(3-0) F. 
Preliminary analysis and design of flight control systems to include autopilots and stability 
augmentation systems. Study of effects of inertial cross-coupling and nonrigid bodies on 
vehicle dynamics. 

MAE 526 Inertial Navigation Analysis and Design. Preq.: MAE Jt35 or U62. 3(3-0) S. 
Performance analysis and engineering design of inertial navigation components, subsys- 
tems and systems. Development of transfer functions and application of linear system 
techniques to determine stability, transient response and errors of gyroscopes, accelerome- 
ters, stable platforms and inertial alignment systems. Error analysis and its significance. 
Preliminary analysis and design of typical inertial navigation systems for aircraft and 
marine vehicles. 

MAE (MAT) 531 Materials Processing by Deformation. Preq.: Six hrs. of solid 
mechanics and/or materials. 3(3-0) F. The course involves a presentation of the mechanical 
and metallurgical fundamentals of materials processing by deformation. Topics to be 
discussed include: principles of metal working, friction, forging, rolling, extrusion, draw- 
ing, high energy rate forming, chipless forming techniques, manufacturing system concept 
in production. 

MAE (MAT) 532 Fundamentals of Metal Machining Theory. Preq.: Six hrs. of solid 
mechanics and/or materials. 3(3-0) S. The course involves a presentation of the mechanical 
and metallurgical fundamentals of metal machining. Topics to be discussed include: 
mechanics of machining, temperatures generated, tool life and tool wear, lubrication, 
grinding process, electrical machining processes, surface integrity, economics, nomencla- 
ture of cutting tools. 

MAE 533 Finite Element Analysis I. Preq.: MAE 3 16 or MAE U72. 3(3-0) F. Fundamen- 
tal concepts of the finite element method for linear stress and deformation analysis of 
mechanical components. Development of truss, beam, frame, plane stress, plane strain, 
axisymmetric and solid elements. Isoparametric formulations. Introduction to structural 
dynamics. Practical modeling techniques and use of general-purpose codes for solving 
practical stress analysis problems. 

MAE 535 Experimental Stress Analysis. Preq.: MAE 316 or 371. 3(2-3) F. Theoretical 
and experimental techniques of strain and stress analysis with emphasis on electrical 
strain gages and instrumentation, brittle coatings, grid methods and an introduction to 
photoelasticity. Laboratory includes an investigation and complete report of a problem 
chosen by the student under the guidance of the instructor. 

MAE 536 Photoelasticity. Preq.: MAE 316 or 371. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. Theory and experi- 
mental techniques of two- and three-dimensional photoelasticity including photoelastic 
coatings, photoplasticity and an application of photoelastic methods to the determination of 
stress-strain distributions in loaded members. Laboratory includes an investigation and 
complete report of a problem chosen by the student under the guidance of the instructor. 



238 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MAE 537 Mechanics of Composite Structures. Preq.: MAE 316 or MAE Jt72. 3(3-0) F. 
Manufacturing techniques with an emphasis placed on the selection of those which produce 
the most favorable end result. Classical plate theory, materials properties and failure 
theories. Micromechanics, repair, plate solutions and elasticity solutions covered as 
required to meet special interests of students. 

MAE 538 Engineering Optics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Fundamentals of geo- 
metric and physical optics as related to problems in engineering design and research. 
Characteristics of imaging systems including multi-element design, geometric and chro- 
matic aberrations and effects of apertures. Properties of light sources and optical proper- 
ties of material also covered. Diffraction, interference and scattering phenomena as related 
to optical measurements techniques. Introduction to lasers and holography. 

MAE 540 Advanced Air Conditioning Design. Preqs.: MAE U03, WU. 3(3-0) S. Psych- 
rometric process representations. Heating and cooling coil design. Heat pump design. Air 
washer design. Direct contact heat and mass transfer systems. Ventilation requirements, 
air dilution calculations. Cooling load calculations; CLTD, CLF and transfer functions 
methods. Room air distribution. 

MAE 541 Advanced Machine Design I. Preq.: MAE U16. 3(3-0) F. An advanced treat- 
ment of stress analysis and mechanics of materials devoted to analytical methods of predict- 
ing the life of mechanical components. Development of the governing differential equations 
ofelasticity. Analyses ofbeams, stress concentrations, pressurized pipes, rotating disks and 
contact stresses. The energy approach to elasticity problems also used as well as a brief 
introduction to plastic failure criteria. 

MAE 542 Mechanical Design for Automated Assembly. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS 
status in engineering. 3(3-0) F. Mechanical design principles important in high volume 
production using modern automated assembly technology. Production and component 
design for ease of assembly as dictated by part handling, feeding, orientation, insertion and 
fastening requirements. Existing product evaluation and redesign for improved assem- 
blage. 

MAE 543 Fracture Mechanics. Preq.: MAE 316. 3(3-0) S. Concept of the elastic stress 
intensity factor, Griffith energy balance, determination of the elastic field at a sharp crack 
tip via eigenfunction expansion methods, J integrals analysis, experimental determination 
of fracture toughness, fatigue crack growth, elastic-plastic crack tip fields. Emphasis given 
to modern numerical methods for determination of stress intensity factors, critical crack 
sizes and fatigue crack propagation rate predictions. 

MAE 544 Real Time Robotics. Preq.: Pascal, C, Fortran or Assembly language expe- 
rience. 3(3-0) F. Real-time programming for servo control using an embedded controller. 
Software and hardware interfacing for control of a D.C. servo device. Multi-tasking intro- 
duced to establish concurrent control of several processes, transforming the servo loop into 
a process that executes concurrently on a single board computer. Hands-on development 
systems and software emulators provided. 

MAE 550 Foundations of Fluid Dynamics. Preqs.: MAE 301. MAE 355 or MAE 308. 
3(3-0) F. Review of basic thermodynamics pertinent to gas dynamics. Detailed development 
of the general equations governing fluid motion in both differential and integral forms. 
Simplification of the equations to those for specialized flow regimes. Similarity parame- 
ters. Applications to simple problems in various flow regimes. 

MAE 551 Airfoil Theory. Preq.: MAE 355. 3(3-0) S. Development of fundamental aero- 
dynamic theory. Emphasis upon mathematical analysis and derivation of equations of 
motion, airfoil theory and comparison with experimental results. Introduction to super- 
sonic flow theory. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 239 

MAE 552 Transonic Aerodynamics. Preq.: MAE 356. 3(3-0) S. A detailed study of the 
latest theoretical and experimental findings in transonic aerodynamics, including two- 
dimensional and axisymmetric flows. 

MAE 553 Compressible Fluids. Preq.: MAE 356 or MAE J^31 or MAE 550. 3(3-0) F. Alt. 
yrs. Equations of motion in supersonic flow. Prandtl-Meyer turns, method of characteris- 
tics, hodograph plane, supersonic wind tunnels, supersonic airfoil theory and boundary 
layer shock interaction. 

MAE 554 Hypersonic Aerodynamics. Preq.: MAE 356. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study of the 
latest theoretical and experimental findings in hypersonic aerodynamics. 

MAE 555 Aerodynamic Heating. Preq.: MAE 356. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study of the 
latest theoretical and experimental findings of the compressible laminar and turbulent 
boundary layers with special attention to the aerodynamic heating problem. Application of 
theory in the analysis and design of aerospace hardware. 

MAE 556 Mechanics of Ideal Fluids. Preq.: MAE 355 or MAE 308. 3(3-0) S. Mass, 
momentum and energy conservation laws, flow kinematics and special forms of the govern- 
ing equations (e.g., Euler equations and Bernoulli's equation). Solutions of Laplace's equa- 
tion for the velocity potential. Applications of complex analysis for two-dimensional poten- 
tial flows. Study of three-dimensional potential flows. Introduction to the effects of 
viscosity. 

MAE 557 Dynamics of Internal Fluid Flow. Preq.: MAE 356 or MAE 308. 3(3-0) F. A 
general development of the governing equations of fluid motion with subsequent restriction 
to incompressible flow. Exact and approximate solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for 
internal laminar flow and elementary boundary layer theory. Applications include: hydro- 
dynamic lubrication, converging-diverging channel flows, entrance flows and turbulent 
internal flow. 

MAE 558 F\asmaigaisdyna.micsl. Preqs.: MAE 356, PYUU. 3(3-0) F. Study of basic laws 
governing plasma motion for dense and rarefied plasmas, hydromagnetic shocks, plasma 
waves and instabilities, simple engineering applications. 

MAE 559 Molecular Gas Dynamics I. Preq.: MAE 550. 3(3-0) F. Statistical mechanics 
as applied to the derivation of the equations of gas dynamics from the microscopic view- 
point. Collision processes, treatments of viscosity, heat conduction and electrical con- 
ductivity. 

MAE 560 Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer. Preqs.: MA 501 or MA 
512, MAE 550 or MAE 557, 3(3-0) S. Introduction to the integration of the governing partial 
differential equations of fluid flow and heat transfer by numerical finite difference means. 
Methods developed for parabolic, hyperbolic and elliptical equations and applied to model 
equations. Error analysis and physical considerations emphasized. 

MAE 561 Wing Theory. Preq.: MAE 551. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Inviscid flow fields over 
wings in subsonic flow discussed. Vortex lattice methods, lifting surface theories and panel 
methods developed for wings with attached flow and leading-edge separation. Aerody- 
namic characteristics calculated and the effects of planform and airfoil shapes determined. 

MAE (MEA) 563 Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See marine, earth 
and atmospheric sciences.) 

MAE (ECE) 565 Gas Lasers. Preqs.: MAE 356 or equivalent, PY U07. 3(3-0) F. Study of 
the principles, design and potential application of ion, molecular, chemical and atomic gas 
lasers. 

MAE 570 Theory of Particulate Collection in Air Pollution Control. Preq.: MAE U09 
orgrad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Particulate matter is classified and its properties are described. 



240 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The motion of particles as applied to particulate collection is carefully analyzed. The 
elements of aerodynamic capture of particles are developed and applications in filtration 
and liquid scrubbing are considered. Fundamentals of acoustical, electrostatic and ther- 
mal precipitation are introduced. Sampling techniques and instrumentation are also 
considered. 

MAE 586 Project Work in Mechanical Engineering. 1-6 F,S. Individual or small 
group investigation of a problem stemming from a mutual student-faculty interest. 
Emphasis placed on providing a situation for exploiting student curiosity. 

MAE 589 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or 
ffrad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Faculty and student discussions of special topics in mechanical 
engineering. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MAE 601 Statistical Thermodynamics. Preq.: MAE .501. 3(3-0) S. The conclusions of 
classical thermodynamics are analyzed and established from the microscopic viewpoint. 
Topics include: ensemble methods, partition functions, translational, rotational and vibra- 
tional energy modes of an ideal gas, chemical equilibrium, imperfect gases, dense fluids, 
critical-point theories, mean free path concepts, Boltzmann equation, hydrodynamic equa- 
tions from kinetic theory and properties of disordered composite media. 

MAE 603 Advanced Direct Energy Conversion. Preq.: MAE 501. 3(3-0) F. An engi- 
neering study of the modern developments in the field of conversion of heat to power in 
order to meet new technology demands. Thermoelectric, thermomagnetic, thermionic, 
photovoltaic and magneto-hydrodynamic effects and their utilization for energy conversion 
purposes, static and dynamic response, limitations imposed by the first and second laws of 
thermodynamics. Energy and entropy balances, irreversible sources, inherent losses, cas- 
cading, design procedures, experimental studies to determine the response and efficiency 
of various systems. 

MAE 604 Fluid Dynamics of Combustion IL Preq.: MAE 50i. 3(3-0) S. Advanced 
theory of detonation and deflagration. Ignition criteria. Direct initiation of detonation 
including blast-wave theory. Transition from deflagration to detonation. Combustion wave 
structure and stability. Liquid droplet and solid particle combustion. 

MAE 608 Advanced Conductive Heat Transfer. Preq.: MAE 505 or MA 501. 3(3-0) S. 
A comprehensive, unified treatment of methodologies for solving multidimensional tran- 
sient and steady heat conduction. Approximate and exact methods of solving nonlinear 
problems, including phase change, temperature-dependent thermal properties, nonlinear 
boundary conditions. Heat conduction in composite media and anisotropic solids. The use of 
finite integral transform and Green's function techniques. 

MAE 609 Advanced Convective Heat Transfer. Preq.: MAE 557. 3(3-0) S. Advanced 
topics in steady and transient, natural and forced convective heat transfer for laminar and 
turbulent flow through conduits and over surfaces. Mass transfer in laminar and turbulent 
flow also covered. Topics on compressible flow with heat and mass transfer included. 

MAE 610 Advanced Radiative Heat Transfer. Preq.: MAE 505. 3(3-0) F. A compre- 
hensive and unified treatment of basic theories; exact and approximate methods of solution 
of radiative heat transfer and the interaction of radiation with conductive and convective 
modes of heat transfer in participating and non-participating media. 

MAE 613 Analytical Methods in Structural Vibration. Preq.: MAE 513. 3(3-0) S. 
Classical problems in structural vibration for which analytical solutions are available. 
Shock response, energy formulations and applications to continuous and discretized sys- 
tems including curved beams, membranes, plates, shells, cylinders, spheres and cones. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 241 

MAE 614 Computational Methods in Structural Vibration. Preq.: CE 527 or MAE 
513. 3(3-0) S. Computational methods developed to analyze the field problems in structural 
vibration for which closed-form solutions are generally unavailable. Aimed primarily at 
linear systems, topics include: linearization and stability, computational methods for the 
eigensolutions and discretization by local function, global function and hybrid approaches, 
applications to undampled, damped and spinning assemblages of beams, rods, strings, 
shafts, membranes and plates. 

MAE 615 Nonlinear Vibrations. Preq.: MAE 513. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A study of free and 
forced vibrations of non-linear systems w^ith non-linear restoring forces and self-sustained 
oscillations. Various analytical and phase plane methods are developed and used in obtain- 
ing actual solutions. Emphasis placed on understanding properties unique to non-linear 
systems. 

MAE 618 Acoustic Radiation II. Preq.: MAE 518. 3(3-0) S. Advanced treatment of the 
theory of sound generation and transmission. Topics include: techniques for solution of the 
wave equation, radiation from spheres, cylinders and plates, sound propagation in ducts, 
scattering. 

MAE 619 Random Yihraition. Preq.: MAE 513. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Mathematical descrip- 
tion of stochastic processes. The stationary and ergodic assumptions and response analysis 
of mechanical systems to random excitation. Simulation of and failure due to random environments. 

MAE 623 Mechanics of Machinery. Preqs.: MAE 315, MA 512. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. 
Advanced applications of dynamics to the design and response analysis of dynamic behav- 
ior of machines and mechanical devices. Emphasis on developing competence in transform- 
ing real problems in dynamics into appropriate mathematical models whose analysis 
permits performance predictions of engineering value. 

MAE 634 Finite Element Analysis II. Preq.: MAE 533. 3(3-0) S. Advanced treatment of 
finite element analysis for non-linear mechanics problems, including the most recent 
developments in efficient solution procedures. Plate bending and shell elements, computa- 
tional plasticity and viscoplastic materials, large deformation formulations, initial stabil- 
ity and buckling, structural vibrations, incompressible elasticity, contact problems, flow in 
incompressible media, weighted residuals and field problems. Development of efficient 
algorithms for practical application. 

MAE 640 Advanced Machine Design II. Preq.: MAE 5Itl. 3(3-0) S. Continuation of 
MAE 541. Problems related to torsion, curved and non-symmetric beams, rings, plates and 
shells, and a brief introduction to fracture mechanics. 

MAE 642 Mechanical Design Analysis. Preq.: Nine hours of graduate credit in MAE. 
3(3-0) F. Lecture and project activity devoted to development of the ability to apply 
knowledge and experience in performing comprehensive design analysis of complete 
mechanical systems. Areas of interest to include critical problem recognition, system 
modeling, performance determination and optimization and reliability evaluation. 

MAE 643 Mechanical Design Synthesis. Preq.: MAE 6^2. 3(2-2) S. Application of the 
basic philosophy and methodology of the complete design process to advanced mechanical 
system design. Individual and group experience in the conception, synthesis, analysis, 
optimization and implementation phases of feasibility, preliminary and final design stu- 
dies; provided by means of comprehensive system design projects. 

MAE 654 Dynamics of Real Fluids I. Preq.: MAE 550 or 557. 3(3-0) S. Exact solutions to 
the Navier-Stokes equations. Approximate solutions for low Reynolds numbers. Approxi- 
mate solutions for high Reynolds numbers— incompressible boundary layer theory. 
Laminar and turbulent boundary layers in theory and experiment. Flow separation. 



242 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MAE 655 Dynamics of Real Fluids II. Preq.: MAE 65U. 3(3-0) F. A continuation of MAE 
654. Compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Laminar and turbulent jets. 
The stability of laminar boundary layers with respect to small disturbances, transition 
from laminar to turbulent flow. 

MAE 656 Turbulence. Preq.: MAE 550. 3(3-0) S. A development of the basic concepts 
and governing equations for turbulence and turbulent field motion. Formulations of the 
various correlation tensors and energy spectra for isotropic and nonisotropic turbulence. 
An introduction to turbulent transport processes, "free" turbulence, and "wall" turbulence. 

MAE 658 Plasmagasdynamics II. Preq.: MAE 558. 3(-0) S. Quantum statistics and 
ionization phenomena. Charged particle interactions. Transport properties in the presence 
of electric and magnetic fields and nonequilibrium ionization. 

MAE 659 Molecular Gas Dynamics II. Preqs.: MAE 559, 601. 3(3-0) S. A continuation of 
MAE 559. Approximate methods of solution to the Boltzmann equation. Modeling of the 
Boltzmann equation. Results obtained by the various methods of analysis. 

MAE 660 Computational Fluid Dynamics. Preq.: MAE 560. 3(3-0) F. Advanced com- 
putational methods for integrating by use of finite differences the non-linear governing 
equations of fluid flow; the Euler equations, the boundary layer equations and the Navier- 
Stokes equations. Topics from the current literature covered. 

MAE 661 Introduction to Rocket Propulsion. Preq.: MAE 501. 3(3-0) F. Review of the 

exterior ballistics and performance of rocket-propelled vehicles. Thermodynamics of real 
gases at high temperatures. Nonequilibrium flow in rocket nozzles. 

MAE (MEA) 663 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See 
marine, earth and atmospheric sciences.) 

MAE (MEA) 664, 665 Perturbation Method in Fluid Mechanics I, II. 3(3-0) F,S. (See 
marine, earth and atmospheric sciences.) 

MAE 686 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 
F,S. Faculty and graduate student discussions of advanced topics in contemporary 
mechanical engineering. 

MAE 695 Mechanical Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Faculty and graduate student 
discussions centered around current research problems and advanced engineering 
theories. 

MAE 699 Mechanical Engineering Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing in mechanical 
engineering, consent of adviser. Credits Arranged. Individual research in the field of 
mechanical engineering. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 243 

Microbiology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. W. Parks, Head 

Professor J. J. Perry, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: W. J. Dobrogosz, G. H. Elkan; Adjunct Professor: R. E. Kanich; 
Associate Professors: G. H. Luginbuhl, J. M. Mackenzie Jr., T. Melton, K. 
Tatchell; Associate Professor (USDA): P. E. Bishop; Adjunct Associate Profes- 
sor: K. T. K\eemBiT\; Assistant Professor: E. S. MiWer; Adjunct Assistant Profes- 
sor: W. S. Dallas 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: P. B. Hamilton, H. M. Hassan, T. R. Klaenhammer, W. E. Kloos, J. G. 
Lecce; Associate Professors: E.Y. De Buysscher, P. M. Foegeding, F.J. Fuller; 
Assistant Professor: P. E. Orndorff 

The Department of Microbiology offers programs leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. These are research oriented programs 
that require a dissertation based on personal research. For students wishing a 
more general education without the thesis requirement, the Master of Life Sci- 
ences degree is offered with an emphasis in microbiology. 

Applicants should have a bachelor's degree in one of the biological or physical 
sciences including at least one course in microbiology and courses in organic 
chemistry and calculus. Deficiencies may be made up while in graduate school 
but will not be counted as credit toward a graduate degree. 

There are no specific departmental requirements regarding courses of study. 
There is a core of basic courses in microbiology that will be in the programs of 
most graduate students who have not had equivalent courses previously. As many 
as half of the courses in most programs will be basic courses in related areas such 
as biochemistry, chemistry, genetics or toxicology. 

At least one semester of half-time teaching experience is required of all Ph.D. 
candidates. All graduate students are expected to attend and participate in the 
seminar program every semester they are in residence. As a general rule the M.S. 
program requires two full years (including summers) beyond the B.S. level and 
the Ph.D. program requires two or three full years beyond the M.S. level. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MB 401 General Microbiology. Preqs.: BS 100; CH 223 or CH 220. MS-3) F,S. 

MB (FS) 405 Food Microbiology. Preq.: MB Wl. 3(2-3) F. 

MB 411 Medical Microbiology. Preq.: MB Wl. M3-3) S. 



244 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MB 490 Special Topics in Microbiology. Preqs.: Three courses in MB and CI. 1-3 

F.S.Sum. 

MB 491 Seminar in Microbiology. Preq.: Jr. standing. 1(1-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MB 501A,B,C Advanced Microbiology I (A-Metabolism; B-Physiology; C-Immun- 
ology ). Preq.: MB Wl- 1 -3 F. Basic concepts and principles of three major areas of microbi- 
ology presented as a series of five-week minicourses: MB 501A, metabolism; MB 501B. 
physiology; MB 501C, immunology. Graduate students majoring in microbiology must take 
all sections or have equivalent knowledge. Others may enroll for specific minicourses. 

Hassan, Lecce, Parks 

MB 502A,B.C Advanced Microbiology II (A-Systematics; B-Virology; C-Patho- 

genesis). Preq.: MB Wl. 1-3 S. Basic concepts and principles of three major areas of 
microbiology presented as a series of five-week minicourses: MB 502A, systematics; MB 
502B, virology; MB 502C, pathogenesis. Graduate students majoring in microbiology must 
take all sections or have equivalent knowledge. Others may enroll for specific minicourses. 

Elkan, Luginbuhl, Graduate Staff 

MB 514 Microbial Metabolic Regulation. Preqs.: MB Wl, BCHA51 orBCH551. 3(3-0) 
F. An integrative perspective on bacterial physiology and metabolism through an analysis 
of metabolic regulatory functions. Hassan, Parks 

MB (SSC) 532 Soil Microbiology. M3-3) S. (See soil science.) 

MB 551 Immunology. Preq.: MB SOlCor equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Principles of the immune 
mechanism of man and animals; interactions between cells of the immune system and their 
genetic basis; the molecular basis of the generation of diversity and selective processes in 
the immune system. Graduate Staff 

MB (ZO) 555 Protozoology. U2-6) S. (See zoology.) 

MB (PHY, PC, VMS) 556 Immunogenetics. 3(2-2) F. (See poultry science.) 

MB (GN) 558 Prokaryotic Molecular Genetics. Preqs.: BCHWl orBCH551, GN411, 
MB Wl. 3(3-0) S. Structure and function in prokaryotic molecular genetics, with emphasis 
on mutations and mutagenic pathways, transcriptional and translational regulation, RNA 
processing, DNA replication and recombination and characterization of recombinant 
DNA molecules. Applications of genetic and recombinant DNA techniques to microbial 
processes, including strain construction and enhancement of gene expression. Miller 

MB (BAE, CE) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. 3(2-3) S. (See civil engineering.) 

MB 571 Molecular Virology of Animal Viruses. Preqs.: BCH 551, MB Wl. 3(3-0) F. 
Animal virus replication. Selected examples from each virus group illustrate the principles 
underlying lytic, persistent and tumor-inducing viral infection. Graduate Staff 

MB (BO) 574 Phycology. 3(1-1^) S. (See botany.) 

MB (BO, PP) 575 The Fungi. 3(3-0) F. (See botany.) 

MB (BO, PP) 576 The Fungi— Lab. 1(0-3) F. (See botany.) 

MB 590 Topical Problems. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 245 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MB (SSC) 632 Ecology and Functions of Soil Microorganisms. 3(3-0) S. (See soil 
science.) 

MB (VMS) 653 Advanced Immunology. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See veterinary medical 
sciences.) 

MB (GN) 660 Experimental Microbial Genetics. Preqs.: BCH 561, GN^ll, MB Wl. 
U(2-6) S. Laboratory-oriented presentation of current methodologies and concepts in 
molecular microbial genetics and their application to strain construction, plasmid and 
phage manipulations, mutagenesis, cloning and genetic engineering of microorganisms. 

Melton 

MB 671 Molecular Virology of Animal Viruses. Preqs.: BCH 551, MB 502B. 3(3-0) F. 
Animal virus replication. Selected examples from each virus group illustrate the principles 
underlying lytic, persistent and tumor-inducing viral infection. Graduate Staff 

MB 690 Microbiology Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

MB 692 Special Problems in Microbiology. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. 

Graduate Staff 

MB 699 Microbiology Research. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Graduate Staff 

Nuclear Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. S. Elleman, Acting Head 

Associate Professor J. G. Gilligan, (Graduate Administrator 

Professors: R. P. Gardner, K. L. Murty, C. E. Siewert, P. J. Turinsky, K. Vergh- 
ese, B. W. Wehring; Professors Emeriti: R. L. Murray, R. F. Saxe, E. Stam, L. 
R. Zumv^alt; Associate Professor: J. M. Doster; Visiting Associate Professor: 0. 
H. Auciello; Assistant Professor: 0. E. Hankins 

The discipline of nuclear engineering is concerned with the development of 
nuclear processes for energy production and with the applications of radiation 
for the benefit of society. The Department of Nuclear Engineering offers gradu- 
ate study via courses and research leading to the Master of Nuclear Engineering, 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Representative topics of investigation include nuclear, analytic, computational 
and experimental research in the neutronics. materials and thermal-hydraulics 
of aspects of fission reactors; radiation detection and measurement of basic 
physics parameters; applications of radioisotopes and radiation in industry, 
medicine and science; and plasma, plasma-material surface interactions and 
design cycles aspects of fusion reactors. 

The department's one-megawatt PULSTAR reactor, which became opera- 
tional in 1973, is similar in design, type of fuel and performance to modern power 
reactors. It is used for teaching, research and service in behalf of the University. 



246 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Also available for student use in research are radiation detection laboratories, 
NAA laboratory, nuclear materials laboratory, plasma and plasma-surface 
interaction laboratory, prompt gamma facility, neutron radiography unit, NMR 
facility, noise analysis equipment, IBM Model 3081 computer, VAX/750 min- 
icomputer, many microcomputers, access to super computers and several other 
well-equipped laboratories. 

Bachelor's degree graduates in any of the fields of engineering or physical 
sciences may be qualified for successful advanced study in nuclear engineering. 
Prior experience or course work in nuclear physics, differential equations and 
basic reactor analysis is helpful but may be gained during the first semester of 
graduate study. 

Teaching assistantships, research assistantships and fellowships are available 
for qualified applicants. Opportunities are also available for graduate trainee- 
ships with utility companies and reactor manufacturers, providing a valuable 
combination of financial support and learning in the classroom, the research 
laboratory and on the job. 

Thirty semester hours are required for the Master of Nuclear Engineering and 
M.S. degrees. Students may also work directly toward a Ph.D. degree. Interdis- 
ciplinary programs with other departments in the College of Engineering and 
the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences are available. 

The advent of competitive nuclear power and the ever-increasing need for 
reliable clean energy has created a strong demand for nuclear engineers to 
participate in all phases of the nuclear power field — environmental studies, 
siting, design, construction, testing, operation, licensing and evaluation. Gradu- 
ates of the department find positions in industry, government and educational 
institutions, working with reactors in the several categories — thermal, fast 
breeder and fusion. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

NE 401 Reactor Analysis and Design. Preq.: C or better in NE 301. M3-2) S. 

NE 402 Reactor Engineering. Preqs.: NE 302, MA UOl. U(3-2) F. 

NE 403 Nuclear Engineering Design Projects. Preqs.: NE UOl, NE W2. 3(2-3) S. 

NE 404 Radiological, Reactor, and Environmental Safety. Preq.: NE 302 or NE Jtl9. 
3(3-0) S. 

NE 405 Reactor Systems. Coreq.: NE U02. 3(3-0) F. 

NE (MAT) 409 Nuclear Materials. Preq.: MAT 201. 2(2-0) S. 

NE 412 Nuclear Fuel Cycles. Preq.: NE 302. 3(3-0) S. 

NE 414 Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation. Preqs.: NE students— ECE 331, 332; 
ECE students— NE U19. 3(3-0) S. 

NE 419 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: PY 202 or PY 208. 3(3-0) F. 

NE 491 Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: CI. 1-U F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 247 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NE 508 Radiation Safety. Preq.: NEiOl orNE520. 3(2-3) S. Presents the basic concepts 
of health physics, biological effects of radiation and calculation of radiation exposure. 
Topics include: radiation units, regulatory agencies and allowable limits of radiation, 
sources of radiation, dose calculations— external and internal, radiation dosimetry, reactor 
radiation sources and dose reduction with particular emphasis on shielding. Mani 

NE (PY) 511 Nuclear Physics for Engineers. 3(3-0) F. (See physics.) 

NE 520 Radiation and Reactor Fundamentals. Preqs.: MA Wl and NEWl or equival- 
ent. 2(2-0) F. An introduction to radiation physics and reactor physics. Topics include 
atomic and nuclear decay processes, nuclear reactions, neutron slowing down and diffu- 
sion, criticality for bare and reflected reactors and reactor kinetics. Graduate Staff 

NE 521 Nuclear Laboratory Fundamentals. Pre9s..-M^ Wl andNEWl or equivalent. 
2(1-3) F. Introduction to nuclear instrumentation and experimental techniques used in 
nuclear engineering research. Topics include radiation detection and spectroscopy, neu- 
tron instrumentation, statistical analysis, use of microcomputers and nuclear reactor 
operations. Graduate Staff 

NE 522 Reactor Dynamics and Control. Preq.: NE Wl or NE 520. 3(3-0) F. Introduces 
the students to methods of describing and analyzing dynamic behavior of systems. These 
methods applied to reactor systems and the effects of feedbacks studies. Methods of measur- 
ing the behavior of reactor systems are described and logic systems for control and safety 
developed. Graduate Staff 

NE 523 Reactor Analysis. Preq.: NE UOl or NE 520. 3(3-0) F. Basic models of neutron 
motion and methods of calculating neutron flux distributions in nuclear reactors. Empha- 
sis on multigroup diffusion theory. Criticality search, neutron slowing down models, reson- 
ance absorption, thermalization and heterogeneous cell calculations. Objective is to enable 
students to read literature and perform relevant analysis in reactor physics. Verghese 

NE 524 Reactor Heat Transfer. Preq.: NE Wl or NE 520. 3(3-0) S. Considers heat 
generation and transfer in nuclear power reactors. Topics include reactor heat generation, 
steady-state and transient heat conduction in reactor fuel elements, boiling heat transfer 
and single and two-phase flow. Doster 

NE (MAT) 525 Nuclear Materials. Preqs.: NEW9 or MAT 201, CI. 3(3-0) F. Introduces 
students to properties and selection of materials for nuclear steam systems and to radiation 
effects on materials. Implications of radiation damage to reactor materials and material 
problems in nuclear engineering discussed. Topics include an overview of nuclear steam 
systems, crystal structure and defects, dislocation theory, mechanical properties, radiation 
damage, hardening and embrittlement due to radiation exposure and problems concerned 
with fission and fusion materials. Murty 

NE 526 Radioisotopes Measurement Applications. Preq.: NE Wl or NE 520. 3(3-0) S. 
Introduces the student to measurement applications using radioisotopes. All the major 
tracing and gauging principles discussed and several specific applications treated in detail. 
Objective to familiarize student with design and analysis of industrial measurement sys- 
tems which use radioisotopes. Gardner, Verghese 

NE 527 Nuclear Engineering Analysis. Preq.: NE Wl or NE 520. 3(3-0) S. Presents 
fundamental material on: (1) numerical methods for solving the partial differential equa- 
tions pertinent to nuclear engineering problems, (2) Monte Carlo simulation of radiation 
transport and (3) data and error analysis techniques including estimation of linear and 
nonlinear model parameters from experimental data. Gardner 



248 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

NE 528 Principles of Fusion Reactors. Preq.: NE Wl or NE 520. 3(3-0) S. Provides an 
introduction to plasma concepts and fusion reactor design. Topics included: basics of 
thermonuclear reactions, charged particle collisions and radiation, plasma confinement, 
plasmas as fluids, formation and heating of plasmas and reactor concepts and design. 

Gilligan, Hankins 

NE 550 Laboratory Projects in Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: NE 521. 3(1-6) F. 
Enhancement of laboratory skills that are pertinent to nuclear engineering research 
sought through projects that require the student to design the experiment, assemble 
equipment, carry out the measurements and analyze and interpret data. Students work in 
groups of two and perform to completion two laboratory projects. Graduate Staff 

NE (MAT) 562 Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering. 3(3-0) F. (See materials 
science and engineering.) 

NE (MAT) 573 Computer Experiments in Materials and Nuclear Engineering. 

3(8-0) S. (See materials science and engineering.) 

NE 580 Plasma Generation and Diagnostics Laboratory. Preq.: NE 528 or PY 508 or 
PY 509. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrfi. Provides an introduction to experimental plasma generation and 
plasma diagnostic techniques. Lecture topics include high vacuum techniques, perturbing 
and non-perturbing probe techniques, and laser and emission spectroscopy. Laboratories 
utilize various methods of measuring plasma parameters discussed in lectures. 

Auciello, Hankins 

NE 581 Fusion Energy Engineering. Preq.: NE 528. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Describes and 
analyzes the technologies of devices necessary to produce fusion energy including vacuum 
technology, plasma heating and fueling, magnetics, special energy conversion, neutronics, 
materials, environment and safety. Design integration and the ensuing technological con- 
straints are stressed. Auciello, Gilligan 

NE 591, 592 Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering L H. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NE 601 Reactor Theory and Analysis. Preqs.:NE 523, 527. 3(3-0) F. Theoretical aspects 
of neutron diffusion and transport related to the design computation and performance 
analysis of nuclear reactors. Principal topics are a unified view of the neutron cycle 
including slowing, resonance capture and thermalization; reactor dynamics and control; 
fuel cycle studies; and neutron transport methods. Background provided for research in 
power and test reactor analysis. Turinsky 

NE (MA) 607 Exact and Approximate Solutions in Particle Transport Theory. 

Preq.: MA 501 or MA 511. 3(3-0) S. The method of elementary solutions used to solve exactly 
basic problems in neutron-transport theory and related topics. In addition, the F^ method 
developed and used to establish concise approximate solutions in the realm of particle 
transport theory. Siewert 

NE 610 Nuclear Reactor Design Calculations. Preq.: NE 523. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Appli- 
cation of the digital computer to problems in reactor core nuclear design. Available reactor 
core physics computer modules studied and exercised. Systems and programs used by 
industry for power reactor core design and core follow described. A review of relevant 
analytic and numerical methods facilitates computer program development by the 
students. Turinsky 

NE 611 Radiation Detection. Preq.: NE 526. 3(2-2) F. Covers the advanced aspects of 
radiation detection such as computer methods applied to gamma-ray spectroscopy, abso- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 249 

lute detector efficiencies by experimental and Monte Carlo techniques, the use and theory 
of solid state detectors, time-of-flight detection experiments and Mossbauer and other 
resonance phenomena. Gardner, Verghese 

NE 612 Thermal Hydraulic Design Calculations. Preq.: NE 52h. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. An 
advanced presentation of thermal-hydraulic analysis of nuclear power systems. Topics 
include development of single phase and two-phase fluid flow evaluations, subchannel 
analysis, models of nonnuclear components, interphase phenomena and numerical solution 
methods relevant to design and safety analysis codes. Doster 

NE 620 Nuclear Radiation Attenuation. Preqs.: NE 527. 3(3-0) F. The physical theory 
and mathematical analysis of the penetration of neutrons, gamma-rays and charged parti- 
cles. Analytical techniques include point kernels, transport theory, Monte Carlo and 
numerical methods. Digital computers employed in the solution of practical problems. 

Doster 

NE 621 Radiation Effects on Materials. Preq.: NE 525. 3(3-0) F. Interactions of radia- 
tion with matter, with emphasis on the physical effects. Current theories and experimental 
techniques discussed. Annealing of defects, radiation induced changes in physical proper- 
ties and effects in reactor materials discussed. Murty 

NE 631 Reactor Kinetics and Control. Preq.: NE 522. 3(3-0) S. A study of the control of 
nuclear reactor systems. Basic control theory developed including the use of Bode, Nyquist 
and S-plane diagrams and state-variable methods. Reactor and reactor systems analyzed 
by these methods and control methods and optimum-control methods developed. Models for 
reactors and reactor-associated units, such as heat exchangers, discussed. The effects of 
non-linearities presented. Saxe 

NE 64 1 Radioisotopes Applications. Preq.: NE 526. 3(3-0) F. Principles and techniques 
of radioisotope applications presented. Topics include radiotracer principles, radiotracer 
applications to engineering processes, radioisotope gauging principles and charged parti- 
cle, gamma ray and neutron radioisotope gauges. Gardner, Verghese 

NE680 P\aisma.EngineeringI. Preq.: NE 528 or equivalent. 3(3-0)S.Alt. yrs. Thestudy 
of fundamental behavior of plasmas as applied to controlled thermonuclear devices and 
other application. Emphasis on energy and particle transport in relevant plasmas. Single 
particle and collective effects detailed. Gilligan 

NE 681 Plasma Engineering II. Preq.: NE 528 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Con- 
tinued study of fundamentals in areas of plasma equilibriums, wave interactions, plasma 
heating, fueling, radiation and atomic physics. Numerical modelling of plasmas stressed. 

Gilligan 

NE 691, 692 Advanced Topics in Nuclear Engineering I, II. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. A 
study of recent development in nuclear engineering theory and practice. Graduate Staff 

NE 695 Seminar in Nuclear Engineering. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of selected topics in 
nuclear engineering. Graduate Staff 

NE 699 Research in Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. 
Individual research in the field of nuclear engineering. Graduate Staff 



250 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Nutrition 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. D. Garlich, Coordinator 

Professors: G. L. Catignani, A. J. Clawson, W. E. Donaldson. R. W. Harvey, C. H. 
Hill. W. L. Johnson. E. E. Jones, D. R. Lineback, A. H. Rakes, H. A. Ramsey, J. 
C. H. Shih. H. E. Swaisgood; Professors Emeriti: L. W. Aurand, E. R. Barrick, 
E. S. Gofer, R. D. Mochrie, F. H. Smith, S. B. Tove, G. H. Wise; Associate 
Professors: M. T. Coffey, W. J. Groom, W. H. Hagler, J. F. Ort, K. R. Pond, J. W. 
Spears 

Graduate study leading to either a Master of Science or a Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in nutrition may be taken in the interdepartmental nutrition program. 
Participating departments include animal science, biochemistry, food science 
and poultry science. Students reside and conduct research in one of these 
departments under the direction of an appropriate advisor. Co-majors involving 
a participating department or related discipline are permitted. Minors may be 
biochemistry, biotechnology, microbiology, physiology, statistics or other ap- 
proved graduate field. 

Research in the nutrition program may be conducted with a variety of species 
and at levels ranging from the molecular to the whole animal. The research may 
be described as nutritional biochemistry or experimental animal nutrition. 
Research facilities in each department are extensive and the problems under 
investigation are many and varied. Additional information about the program 
may be obtained by writing to Dr. J. D. Garlich, Coordinator, Nutrition Program, 
P.O. Box 7608, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 
27695-7608. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

NTR (ANS, PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition. Preq.: CH 220 or both 221 and 223. 3(3-0) 
F. 

NTR (ANS) 419 Human Nutrition in Health and Disease. Preqs.: BCH U51, NTR 
(ANS,PO) Itl5 or FS UOO. 3(3-0) S. 

Associated courses related to nvtrition are: 

FS 400 Foods and Nutrition. Preq.: CH 220. 3(3-0) F. 

FS 402 Food Chemistry. Preq.: CH 220 or CH 221. 3(2-3) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NTR (ANS) 516A,B,C,D Animal Nutrition Research Methods. Preq.: BCH Jt51 or 
NTR (ANS) 415 or NTR (ANS) il9 or FS WO. 3(1-6) S. Theory and practice of modern 
research techniques in ruminant and monogastric animal nutrition: NTR (ANS) 516A, 
nutritive evaluation of feedstuffs; NTR (ANS) 516B, biological evaluation of feeds and 
diets: NTR (ANS) 516C, blood and tissue analysis; NTR (ANS) 561D, forage and pasture 
evaluation. Students can register for any combination. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 251 

NTR (FS) 530 Human Nutrition. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See food science.) 

NTR (ANS) 540 Ruminant Physiology and Metabolism. 3(3-0) F. Even yrs. (See 
animal science.) 

NTR 590 Topical Problems in Nutrition. Preq.: Grad. orsr. standing. 1-6 F,S. Analysis 
of current problems in nutrition. Also entails the scientific appraisal and solution of a 
selected problem designed to provide training and experience in research. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NTR 601 Protein and Amino Acid Metabolism. Preqs.: BCH 551, ZO Jf21, a UOO-level 
nutrition course. 3(3-0) S. Protein and amino acid metabolism, regulation, dietary require- 
ments and techniques for their investigation in human and other animals studied. 

Garlich 

NTR (ANS, PO) 605 Mineral Metabolism. Preqs.: ANS (NTR, PO) Jtl5 or BCH 551, 
BCHlf51 and ZO J4.2I. 3(3-0) F. Requirements, function, distribution, absorption, excretion 
and toxicity of minerals in humans and domestic animals. Interactions between minerals 
and other factors affecting mineral metabolism or availability. Emphasis on mechanisms 
associated with mineral functions and the metabolic bases for the development of signs of 
deficiency. Spears 

NTR(FS)606 Vitamin Metabolism. Pregs..- A A^Sf'A^T/^, PO)J,15andBCH551. 2(2-0)F. 
Even yrs. Structures, chemical and physical properties, functions, deficiency symptoms, 
distribution, absorption, transport, metabolism, storage, excretion and toxicity of the 
vitamins in humans and domestic animals. Nutritional significance of the essential fatty 
acids and the metabolism of prostaglandins, prostacyclins and leucotrienes. 

Catignani, Garlich, Jones, Shih 

NTR 608 Energy Metabolism. Preqs.: BCH 551 and an introductory NTR course. 3(3-0) 
F. This course relates biochemical and physiological events within the cell, tissue, organ 
and system with the nutrient needs as sources of energy for productive animal life. Diges- 
tion, absorption and metabolism of energy sources discussed. Processes of energy trans- 
formations within living structures presented in relation to energetics, biological oxida- 
tions, coupled reactions, anabolic and catabolic systems, metabolic control, partitioning 
and efficiency. Spears 

NTR 690 Advanced Special Problems in Nutrition. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F,S. 
Directed research in a specialized phase of nutrition designed to provide experience in 
research methodology and philosophy. Graduate Staff 

NTR 699 Research in Nutrition. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original 
research preparatory to the thesis for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

Graduate Staff 



Occupational Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see occupa- 
tional education under education. 



252 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Operations Research 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor S. E. Elmaghraby, Chairman and Program Director 

Professors: B. B. Bhattacharyya, J. W. Bishir, W. Chou, H. A. Devine. J. C. Dunn. 
S.-C. Fang. R. M. Felder. W. S. Galler, H. J. Gold, R. E. Hartwig. T. J. Hodgson, 
C. T. Kelley, C. J. Maday, D. F. McAllister, C. D. Meyer, A. A. Nilsson, H. L. W. 
Nuttle, H. J. Perros, E. L. Peterson, H. Sagan, W. J. Stewart; Professor Emeri- 
tus: N. J. Rose; Associate Professors: T. L. Honeycutt, T. W. Reiland, J. 
Rodrigues, C. D. Savage. C. E. Smith; Assistant Professors: N. M. Bengtson, 
Y. Fathi, R. Haas. R. E. King. M. F. M. Stallmann. S. J. Wright 

Operations research is a graduate program of a interdisciplinary nature, 
governed by an administrative board and the program committee, and adminis- 
tered through the office of the program director. 

The program offers the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 
Both are research degrees requiring a thesis. A foreign language is not required 
at the master's level and is optional with the student's advisory committee at the 
doctoral level. A brochure is available which describes in more detail the 
requirements for both degrees. 

An advanced program of study in operations research implies intensive study 
in at least two of the following areas: mathematical optimization, dynamical 
systems and control theory, stochastic systems, econometrics and economic deci- 
sion theory and information and cybernetics. 

For students who wish to combine their study in OR with studies in another 
field, the program offers a joint program at the Ph.D. level in computer studies 
and another joint program at the M.S. level with management. Furthermore, the 
OR program encourages co-majoring with mathematics, statistics or any field of 
science and engineering. Please consult the OR brochure for more details. 

CENTRAL COURSES 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

OR 501 Introduction to Operations Research. Preqs.:MA U21 orSTU21 or ST 371 and 
ST S72. 3(3-0) F,S. OR Approach: modeling, constraints, objective and criterion. The 
problem of Multiple criteria. Optimization, Model validation. The team approach. Systems 
Design. Examples, OR Methodology': mathematical programming; optimum seeking: sim- 
ulation, gaming; heuristic programming. Examples. OR Applications; theory of inventory; 
economic ordering under deterministic and stochastic demand. The production smoothing 
problem; linear and quadratic cost functions. Waiting line problems: single and multiple 
servers with Poisson input and output. The theory of games for two-person competitive 
situations. Project management through PERT-CPM. Elmaghraby, Fathi 



OR (IE, MA) 505 Linear Programming. Preq.: MA 405. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction 
including: applications to economics and engineering; the simplex method and its main 
variants: parametric programming and post-optimality analysis; duality matrix games, 
linear systems solvability theory and linear systems duality theory; polyhedral sets and 
cones, including their convexity and separation properties and dual representations; equil- 
ibrium prices, Lagrange multipliers, subgradients and sensitivity analysis. 

Fathi, Peterson 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 253 

OR 506 Algorithmic Methods in Nonlinear Programming.Pregs.; MA 301, MA 405, 
knowledge of computer language, such as FORTRAN or PLl. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to 
methods for obtaining approximate solutions to unconstrained and constrained minimiza- 
tion problems of moderate size. Emphasis on geometrical interpretation and actual coordi- 
nate descent, steepest descent, Newton and quasi-Newton methods, conjugate gradient 
search, gradient projection and penalty function methods for constrained problems. Spe- 
cialized problems and algorithms will be treated as time permits. Fang, Fathi 

OR (IE) 509 Dynamic Programming. Preqs.:MA W5, ST 421. 3(3-0) S. An introduction 

to the theory and computational aspects of dynamic programming and its application to 
sequential decision problems. Elmaghraby 

OR 520 Theory of Activity Networks. Preqs.: OR 501, OR (IE, MA) 505. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Introduction to graph theory and network theory. A discussion in depth of the theory 
underlying (1) deterministic activity networks (CPM): optimal time-cost trade offs; the 
problem of scarce resources; (2) probabilistic activity networks (PERT): critical evaluation 
of the underlying assumptions; (3) generalized activity networks (GERT, GAN): applica- 
tions of signal flow graphs and semi-Markov process to probabilistic branching; relation to 
the theory of scheduling. Elmaghraby 

OR (CHE) 527 Optimization of Engineering Processes. Preqs.: CHE 451 or OR 501, 
FORTRAN programming. 3(3-0) F. The formulation and solution of process optimization 
problems, with emphasis on nonlinear programming techniques. Computer implementa- 
tion of optimization algorithms and structuring of process models to increase computa- 
tional efficiency. Felder 

OR (E, MA) 531 Dynamic Systems and Multivariable Control I. Preqs.: MA 301, MA 
405. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to the modeling, analysis and control of linear discrete-time and 
continuous-time dynamical systems. State space representations and transfer methods. 
Controllability and observability. Realization. Applications to biological, chemical, eco- 
nomic, electrical, mechanical and sociological systems. Dunn, Rose 

OR (IE) 561 Queues and Stochastic Service Systems. Preq.: MA 421. 3(3-0) F. General 
concepts of stochastic processes introduced. Poisson processes, Markov processes, and 
renewal theory presented. These then used in the analysis of queues, starting with a 
completely memoryless queue to one with general parameters. Applications to many 
engineering problems considered. Bengtson, Stewart 

OR (CSC, ECE, IE) 562 Computer Simulation Techniques. 3(3-0) F. (See computer 
science.) 

OR (BMA, ST) 575 Decision Analytic Modeling. 4(3-2) F. Alt. yrs. (See statistics.) 

OR (CSC, MA) 585 Graph Theory. Preq.: MA 231 or 405. 3(3-0) F. Basic concepts of 
graph theory. Trees and forests. Vector spaces associated with a graph. Representation of 
graphs by binary matrices and list structures. Traversability. Connectivity. Matchings and 
assignment problems. Planar graphs. Colorability. Directedgraphs. Applications of graph 
theory with emphasis on organizing problems in a form suitable for computer solution. 

Savage 

OR (IE, MA) 586 Network Flows. Preq.: OR (IE, MA) 505 or equivalent. 3(2-2) S. Alt. 
yrs. This course studies problems of flows in networks. These problems include the deter- 
mination of the shortest chain, maximal flow and minimal cost flow in networks. The 
relationship between network flows and linear programming developed as well as prob- 
lems with nonlinear cost functions, multi-commodity flows and the problem of network 
synthesis. Nuttle, Stallmann 

OR 591 Special Topics in Operations Research. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S,Sum. Individual or 
small group studies of special areas of OR which fit into the students' programs of study and 



254 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

which may not be covered by other OR courses. Furthermore, the course serves as a vehicle 
for introducing new or specialized topics at the introductory graduate level. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

OR (CSC) 605 Large Scale Linear Programming Systems. Preqs.: OR 505 and FOR- 
TRAN programming experience. 3(3-0) Alt. S. A study of the specialized algorithms for the 
efficient solution of large scale LP problems. Includes: parametric programming, bounded 
variable algorithms, generalized upper bounding, decomposition, separable programming 
and mixed integer programming. Emphasis is on gaining firsthand practical experience 
with current computer codes and computational procedures. Fang, Haas 

OR (MA, ST) 606 Nonlinear Programming. Preq.: OR (IE, MA) 505. 3(3-0) S. This 
course provides an advanced mathematical treatment of the analytical and algorithmic 
aspects of finite dimensional nonlinear programming. It includes an examination of the 
structure and effectiveness of computational methods for unconstrained and constrained 
minimization. Special attention will be directed toward current research and recent devel- 
opments in the field. Fang, Peterson 

OR 609 Advanced Dynamic Programming. Preqs.: OR 509, MA 5il. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Introduction to measure theoretic concepts, review of finite state Markov processes, theory 
of Markovian programming, discrete decision processes, continuous time dynamic pro- 
gramming, relation to calculus of variation and the Maximum Principle. Emphasis 
throughout is on recent theoretical development in the field. (Offered in alt. years.) 

Elmaghraby 

OR (BMA, MA, ST) 610 Stochastic Modeling. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See biomathematics.) 

OR (BMA) 611 System Modeling Theory. 3(3-0). (See biomathematics.) 

OR (MA) 614 Integer Programming. Preqs.: MA U05, OR (MA, IE) 505; Coreq.: Some 
familiarity with computers (e.g., CSC HI). 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Study of general integer 
programming problems and principal methods of solving them. Emphasis on intuitive 
presentation of ideas underlying various algorithms rather than detailed description of 
computer codes. The students have some "hands on" computing experience that should 
enable them to adapt the ideas presented in the course to integer programming problems 
they may encounter. Fathi, Stallmann 

OR (MA) 629 Vector Space Methods in System Optimization. Preqs.: MA U05, 511 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to algebraic and function-analytic concepts used in sys- 
tem modeling and optimization: vector space, linear mappings, spectral decomposition, 
adjoints, orthogonal projection, quality, fixed points and differentials. Emphasis on geo- 
metric insight. Topics include least square optimization of linear systems, minimum norm 
problems in Banach space, linearization in Hilbert space, iterative solution of system 
equations and optimization problems. Broad range of applications in operations research 
and system engineering including control theory, mathematical programming, economet- 
rics, statistical estimation, circuit theory and numerical analysis. Dunn, Sagan 

OR (E, MA) 631 Dynamic Systems and Multivariable Control II. Preq.: OR (E, MA) 
531. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Stability of equilibrium points for nonlinear systems. Liapunov 
functions. Unconstrained and constrained optimal control problems. Pontryagin's maxi- 
mum principle and dynamic programming. Computation with gradient methods and 
Newton methods. Multidisciplinary applications. Dunn, Rose 

OR (CSC, IE) 662 Stochastic Simulation Design and Analysis. 3(3-0) S. (See computer 
science.) 

OR 691 Special Topics in Operations Research. Preqs.: OR 501, OR (IE, MA) 505. 3(3-0) 
F,S.Sum.. The purpose of this course is to allow individual students or small groups of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 255 

students to take on studies of special areas in OR which fit into their particular program 
and which may not be covered by other OR courses. The work directed by a qualified faculty 
member and in some instances by visiting professors. The subject matter in any year 
dependent on the students and the faculty members. Graduate Staff 

OR (IE, MA) 692 Special Topics in Mathematical Programming. Preqs.: OR (IE, MA) 
505. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. The study of special advanced topics in the area of mathematical 
programming. New techniques and current research in this area discussed. The faculty 
responsible for this course select according to their preference and interest the areas to be 
covered during the semester. This course not necessarily taught by an individual faculty 
but can, on occasion, be a joint effort of several faculty members from this university as well 
as visiting faculty from other institutions. To date, courses on Theory of Networks, Optimal 
Control Algorithms and Integer Programming have been offered under the umbrella of 
this course. It is anticipated that these topics will be repeated in the future, together with 
other topics. Graduate Staff 

OR 695 Seminar in Operations Research. Preq.: Enrollment in OR as a major or minor. 
1(1-0) F,S. Seminar discussion of operations research problems. Case analyses and reports. 
Graduate students with minors or majors in operations research are expected to attend 
throughout the period of their residence. Elmaghraby 

OR 699 Project in Operations Research. Preq.: Variable. 1-3 F,S,Sum. Individual 
research by graduate students minoring and majoring in operations research. Research 
may be done under the operations research faculty member meeting the interest need of the 
student. Graduate Staff 

SUGGESTED COGNATE COURSES 

Cognate courses in the operations research program are courses often included 
in programs of study but which carry other departmental designations. They 
cover subject matter closely related to operations research and provide addi- 
tional insight into the basis or application of operations research techniques. 
Students should not assume they will be able to include any of the cognate courses 
in their own program of study unless they have made previous arrangements 
with their faculty advisor. 

Biomathematics 

BMA (MA, ST) 571, 572 Biomathematics I & II 

Chemical Engineering 

CHE 525 Chemical Process Control 

Civil Engineering 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems 

Computer Science 

CSC 505 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 
CSC (MA) 529, 530 Numerical Analysis I, II 
CSC (ECE) 671 Advanced Computer Performance Modelling 



256 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Economics and Business 

EB 650 Economic Decision Theory 

EB (ST) 651 Econometrics 

EB (ST) 652 Topics in Econometrics 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 

ECE 516 System Control Engineering 

ECE (CSC) 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design 

ECE 691 Special Studies in Electrical Engineering 

Industrial Engineering 

IE 523 Production Planning, Scheduling and Inventory Control 

IE 547 Reliability Engineering 

IE 548 Quality Engineering 

IE 611 The Design of Production Systems 

IE 622 Inventory Control Methods II 

Mathematics 

MA (ST) 541 Theory of Probability I 

MA (ST) 542 Introduction to Stochastic Processes 

MA (ST) 617, 618 Measure Theory and Advanced Probability 

MA 622 Linear Transformations and Matrix Theory 

MA 623 Theory of Matrices and Applications 

Statistics 

ST 583 Introduction to Statistical Decision Theory 

ST 613 Time Series Analysis: Time Domain 

ST 614 Time Series Analysis: Frequency Domain 

Pest Management 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor Blanche C. Haning, Program Coordinator 

Professors: J. T. Ambrose, C. S. Apperson, C. W. Averre III, R. C. Axtell, J. S. 
Bacheler, M. K. Beute, J. R. Bradley Jr., W. M. Brooks, G. A. Carlson, H. D. 
Coble, F. T. Corbin, J. M. Davis, E. J. Dunphy, H. J. Gold, F. P. Hain, G. G. 
Kennedy, W. M. Lewis, L. D. King, T. J. Monaco, G. C. Rock, D. P. Schmitt, T. J. 
Sheets, W. A. Skroch, R. E. Stinner, T. B. Sutton, J. W. Van Duyn, A. D. 
Worsham; Professor (USD A): R. A. Reinert; Associate Professors: J . J. Arends, 
J. E. Bailey, R. L. Brandenburg, R. L Bruck, F. Gould, H. M. Linker, J. R. 
Meyer. M. M. Peet, G. J. San Julian, P. S. Southern; Assistant Professor: D. L. 
Hoag 

The concept of integrated pest management (IPM) combines the theoretical 
and practical aspects of cultural, biological and chemical control into effective 
systems that maintain pest populations at levels that minimize economic and 
environmental damage. This approach and its implementation are opening new 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 257 

career opportunities for broadly informed individuals who understand the basic 
biology and ecology of pests and the systems with which they are associated. 

Graduate study in integrated pest management draws upon faculty from 
several departments, especially plant pathology, entomology, crop science and 
horticultural science. The Integrated Pest Management Teaching Subcommit- 
tee establishes the general requirements. Each student's advisory committee 
must include a member of the IPM graduate faculty. All programs must have the 
approval of the chairman of the IPM Teaching Subcommittee. 

A graduate minor in pest management emphasizing agricultural crops is 
available for the Master of Science degree. This minor provides students with an 
understanding of the theory, purpose and practice of integrated pest manage- 
ment. Required courses or their equivalents are PM 415, Principles of Pest 
Management; PM 490, Pest Management Seminar or PM 595, Topical Problems 
in Integrated Pest Management, and at least one graduate level course each in 
plant pathology, entomology and weed science. A course in ecology also is 
recommended. This plan can also be accommodated in the Master of Agriculture 
degree program. 

Additionally, a concentration in pest management is available within the 
Master of Agriculture degree and is identified by "Pest Management" on the 
transcript. This concentration involves a minimum of 36 credit hours and allows 
interdisciplinary programs of study tailored to students' needs. It includes grad- 
uate course work from at least four closely related disciplines and a minimum 
3-month internship in the field. Opportunities for teaching and observing or 
cooperating in research are available. In the crop production and protection area 
the following courses or their equivalents are required: PP 515, Epidemiology 
and Plant Disease Control; ENT 562, Insect Pest Management in Agricultural 
Crops; SSC 541, Soil Fertility and three hours of advanced course work in weed 
science. Deficiencies in basic course work in the crop and pest disciplines includ- 
ing integrated pest management will be taken in addition to these minimum 
requirements. Graduate students enrolled in this program are located in the 
department of their major professor and participate in departmental activities, 
including seminar. 

Additional information may be obtained by contacting a member of the Grad- 
uate Faculty or the IPM Program Coordinator, 2705 Bostian Hall, Box 7611, 
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7611. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PM 415 Principles of Pest Management. Preqs.:ENT312, PP315, BO(ZO)360: C(yreq.: 

CS J,U. U3-3) F. 

PM 490 Pest Management Seminar. Preq.: PM J^15. 2(1-1) S. 
FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PM 590 Advanced Topics in Integrated PestManagement. Pre(7..PM .405 or PM4i5. 

1-6 F,S,Sum. Directed studies in Integrated Pest Management. Provides opportunity for 
advanced students to increase their understanding of current IPM philosophy, literature, 
research and technology through instruction or work experience in the field. 

Graduate Staff 



258 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PM 595 Topical Problems in Integrated Pest Management. Preq.: PM U5. 2(1-2) S. 
One weekly lecture followed by discussions and projects relating to current topics in 
integrated pest management (IPM) under the guidance of interdisciplinary faculty teams; 
improves understanding of the depth and complexities of IPM and opportunities and 
limitations for its implementation. Haning 

Students are advised to review course listings in such relevant departments as animal 
science, crop science, economics and business, entomology, horticultural science, plant 
pathology, soil science, the biomathematics program and the College of Forest Resources. 

Physics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. R. Patty, Head 

Professor G. E. Mitchell, Associate Head and Graduate Administrator 

Professors: K. T. Chung, S. R. Cotanch, W. R. Davis, W. 0. Doggett, R. E. Fornes, 
C. R. Gould, D. G. Haase, G. L. Hall, A. W. Jenkins Jr., C. E. Johnson, G. H. 
Katzin, F. Lado Jr., G. Lucovsky, J. D. Memory, J. Y. Park, J. S. Risley, D. E. 
Sayers, J. F. Schetzina, L. W. Seagondollar, D. R. Tilley; Prof essors Emeriti: 3 . 
T. Lynn, E. R. Manring, A. C. Menius, Jr.; Associate Professors: 3. Bernholc, G. 
C. Cobb Jr., J. W. Cook Jr., K. L. Johnston, M. A. Klenin, J. R. Mowat, R. J. 
Nemanich, M. A. Paesler, G. W. Parker III; Assistant Prof essors: D. C. Ellison, 
S. P. Reynolds 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: J. M. A. Danby, J. Narayan, D. L. Ridgeway; Associate Professors: R. 
N. Kolbas, L. K. Norris 

Study in physics is available leading to the degrees of Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy. Computing facilities include a departmental VAX 11/750 
computer plus access to a Cray Y-MP located at the North Carolina Supercom- 
puting Center in Research Triangle Park. The Triangle Universities Nuclear 
Laboratory, located on the Duke University campus, is jointly staffed by Duke 
University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina 
State University. The major facilities are a 15 MeV model FN tandem Van de 
Graaff Accelerator with various polarized beams and targets and on-line compu- 
ter facilities. 

Experimental and theoretical research is being performed in atomic and 
molecular physics, nuclear physics, plasma physics and condensed matter phys- 
ics. Theoretical work is in progress in relativity and general field theory, statisti- 
cal theory and astrophysics. 

Programs of study leading to the Master of Science degree require a minimum 
of 30 semester hours; a thesis is required. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is granted on successful completion of exami- 
nations, independent research and the submission of an acceptable dissertation. 
A minor area of study is required. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 259 

A large number of teaching and research assistantships is available. An out-of- 
state student holding such an assistantship may be eligible for reduced tuition 
charges. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PY 401, 402 Quantum Physics L IL Preq.: PY Ul. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics. Preqs.: PY208, MA 202. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PY 4 10 Introductory Nuclear Physics. Preq.: PY 202 or 208. M3-2) S. 

PY 411, 412 Mechanics I, II. Preqs.: PY 203 or 208, MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PY 413 Thermal Physics. Preq.: PY 202 or 208; Coreq.: MA 301. 3(3-0) S. 

PY 414, 415 Electromagnetism I, II. Preqs.: PY 203 or 208 and MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PY 441 Spacetime Physics. Preq.: PY 203 or k07. 3(3-0) S. 

PY 451 Electronics for Physicists. Preq.: PYlfU; Coreq.: PY U5. 3(1-U) F. 

PY 452 Advanced Physics Laboratory. Preqs.: Sr. standing and CI. 1(0-3) F,S. 

PY 499 Special Problems in Physics. Preq.: Consent of department. 1-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PY 506 Nuclear and Subatomic Physics. Preqs.: PY 203 or A07; PY Jtl2. 3(3-0) F. An 
introduction to nuclear and subatomic phenomena: properties of nuclear radiations and 
detectors, accelerators, nuclear forces and nuclear structure, elementary particles, funda- 
mental symmetries and conservation laws. Gould 

PY 508 Ion and Electron Physics. Preq.: PY JtU. 3(3-0) F. Topics covered: charged 
particle dynamics, introduction to plasma physics, processes in ionized gases, electron 
emission and the physics of electron beams. Doggett 

PY 509 Plasma Physics. Preq.: PY UH. 3(3-0) F. The individual and collective motion of 
charged particles in electric and magnetic fields and through ionized gases. Doggett 

PY 510 Nuclear Physics II. Preq.: PY^IO. M3-2) S. The properties of the atomic nucleus 
as revealed by radioactivity, nuclear reactions and scattering experiments with emphasis 
on the experimental approach. The laboratory stresses independent research and offers 
project work in nuclear spectroscopy and in neutron physics. Graduate Staff 

PY (NE) 511 Nuclear Physics for Engineers. Preq.: PY UIO. 3(3-0) F. The properties of 
atomic nuclei, of nuclear radiations and of the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter. 
Emphasis on the principles of modern equipment and techniques of nuclear measurement 
and their application to practical problems. Graduate Staff 

PY 516 Physical Optics. Preq.:PYil5. 3(3-0)F. Physical optics with the major emphasis 
on the wave properties of light. Boundary conditions, interference and diffraction, optics of 
thin films, fiber optics and applications to absorption, scattering and la.ser operation. A 
background in Maxwell's equations and vector analysis required. Johnson 

PY 517 Atomic and Molecular Physics. Preqs.: PY UOU U12. 3(3-0) S. The quantum 
mechanical treatment of structure and spectra for atoms and molecules. Topics include the 
hydrogen atom, helium atom, multielectron atoms, selection rules, diatomic and simple 
polyatomic molecules and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mowat 



260 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PY 521 Statistical Physics I. Preqs.: PY UOh FY U13. 3(3-0) S. The basic elements of 
kinetic theory and equilibrium statistical mechanics, both classical and quantum; applica- 
tions of the techniques developed to various ideal models of noninteracting particles. 

Jenkins 

PY 531 Advanced Placement Physics for Secondary School Teachers. Preq.: Teach- 
ing certificate. 6(6-0) Sum. A preparation for teaching advanced placement physics to high 
school students. A review of the physics content on the AP curriculum and discussion of 
teaching techniques, demonstrations and laboratories for use in such a program. 

Graduate Staff 

PY 543 Astrophysics. Preqs.: PY 203 or U07; PYUll. 3(3-0) S. The basic physics neces- 
sary to investigate, from observational data, the internal conditions and evolution of stars. 
Topics include the formation and structure of spectral lines, methods of energy generation 
and transport, stellar structure, degeneracy, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Reynolds 

PY (ECE) 552 Introduction to the Structure of Solids. Preq.: PY 401. 3(3-0) S. Basic 
considerations of crystalline solids, metals, conductors and semiconductors. Bernholc 

PY 553 Introduction to the Structure of Solids II. Preq.: PY552 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 
A study of the properties of semiconductors, superconductors, magnets, ferroelectrics and 
crystalline defects and dislocations. Paesler 

PY (MA) 555 Mathematical Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. 3(3-0) F. (See 
mathematics.) 

PY (MA) 556 Orbital Mechanics. 3(3-0) S. (See mathematics.) 

PY 561 Electronics for Physicists. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(1-4) S. Analog and digital 
electronics laboratory course serving as an introduction to the use of modern instrumenta- 
tion required for experimental research in physics. Bipolar and field effect transistors, 
operational amplifiers, oscillators, power supplies, analog-digital and digital-analog con- 
version and digital logic circuits. Cobb 

PY 581, 582 Qu3intumMechsinicsl,U. Preqs.: MA 5 12; PY ill or iU; grad. standing or 
permission of the grad. administrator. 3(3-0) F,S. Fundamental concepts and formulations, 
including interpretation and techniques, and the application of theory to simple physical 
systems, such as the free particle, the harmonic oscillator, the particle in a potential well 
and central force problems. Other topics include approximation methods, identical parti- 
cles and spin, transformation theory, symmetries and invariance, and an introduction to 
quantum theory of scattering and angular momentum. Johnson 

PY 583 Advanced Classical Mechanics I. Preqs.: MA 512, PY Jtl2, PY UU; grad. 
standing or permission of the grad. administrator. 3(3-0) F. An introduction to theoretical 
physics in preparation for advanced study. Emphasis on classical mechanics, special 
relativity and the motion of charged particles. Topics include variational principles, 
Hamiltonian dynamics and the canonical transformation theory, structure of the Lorentz 
group and elementary dynamics of unquantized fields. Chung 

PY584 Advanced Classical Mechanics II. Pre^s./Pyj^^; grad standing or permission 
of the grad. administrator. 3(3-0) S. Advanced classical mechanics, including continuum 
mechanics, fields, the group theoretical approach to dynamics and other selected topics. 

Katzin 

PY 585, 586 Advanced Electricity and Magnetism I, II. Preqs.: PY Ul 5; grad. standing 
or permvision of the grad. administrator. 3(3-0) F,S. Topics include: techniques for the 
solution of potential problems, development of Maxwell's equations; wave equations, 
energy, force and momentum relations of an electromagnetic field; covariant formulation 
of electrodynamics; radiation from accelerated charges. Parker 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 261 

PY 590 Special Topics in Physics. Preq.: Consent of department. Credits arranged. F,S. 
Investigations in physics under staff guidance. May consist of literature reviews, experi- 
mental or theoretical projects or special topics lectures. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PY 601, 602 Theoretical Physics I, IL Preqs.: PY 583, 586; Coreq.: MA 661. 3(3-0) F,S. 
The mathematical and theoretical approach to the relationships between various branches 
of physics is treated. The restricted theory of relativity, electro-dynamics, classical field 
theory and the general theory of relativity and geometro-dynamics are considered. Davis 

PY 611 Advanced Quantum Mechanics L Preqs.: MA 512, PY 582. 3(3-0) F. An 
introduction to the relativistic quantum theory of Dirac particles and the positron. Other 
topics include second quantization technique and its application to many-body problems, 
radiation theory and the quantization of the electromagnetic field. Cotanch 

PY 612 Advanced Quantum Mechanics IL Preqs.: PY 601, 611. 3(3-0) S. A general 
propagator treatment of Dirac particles, photons, and scalar and vector mesons. Applica- 
tions of Feynman graphs and rules will be given illustrating basic techniques employed in 
the treatment of electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. Renormalization theory, 
the effects of radiative corrections and aspects of the general Lorentz covariant theory of 
quantized fields also considered. Cotanch 

PY 622 Statistical Physics IL Preq.: PY 521. 3(3-0) F. A continuation of PY 521, with 
emphasis on the static and dynamic properties of real (interacting) systems. Topics include 
the equilibrium theory of fluids and the linear response theory of time-dependent 
phenomena. Lado 

PY (ECE) 627 Semiconductor Thin Films Technolo^. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See electri- 
cal and computer engineering.) 

PY630 Nucleair Structure Physicsl. Preqs.: PY 582; PY 506 or 5 10. 3(3-0) S. Advanced 
description of nuclear models and nuclear reactions. Topics include: internucleon forces, 
compound-nucleus processes, shell model, optical model, R-matrix theory, direct reactions, 
collective model, electromagnetic transitions, isobaric analog states. Mitchell 

PY 690 Advanced Special Topics in Physics. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Advanced study in 
astrophysics, atomic and molecular physics, condensed matter physics, nuclear physics or 
plasma physics. Emphasis on new and rapidly developing research areas. Graduate Staff 

PY 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Reports on topics of current interest in physics. Several 
sections offered so that students with common research interests may be grouped together. 

Graduate Staff 

PY 699 Research. Credits Arranged. Graduate students sufficiently prepared may 
undertake research in some selected field of physics. Graduate Staff 

Physiology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor J. T. Brake, Coordinator 

Professors: R. A. Argenzio. J. H. Britt, E. V. Caruolo, V. L. Christensen, F. W. 
Edens, C. H. Hill, E. Hodgson, T. E. LeVere, I. S. Longmuir, W. D. Oxender, J. 
F. Roberts, M. C. Roberts, T. D. Slopes, D. E. Smith, C. E. Stevens, C.-S. Teng, 
H. A. Underwood Jr.; Adjunct Professor: J. P. Thaxton; Professors Emeriti: L. 



262 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Goode, L. C. Ulberg; Associate Professors: B. L. Black, K. L. Esbenshade, R. M. 
Grossfeld, N. C. Olson. R. M. Fetters; Adjunct Associate Prof essor: M. S. Hand; 
Assvitant Professors: J . D. Armstrong, H. M. Berschneider, J. E. Gadsby, M. A, 
Qureshi, R. M. Roe, R. M. Shuman, C. V. Sullivan 

Graduate study under the direction of the physiology faculty may lead to the 
Master of Science, Master of Life Sciences and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 
The physiology faculty is an interdepartmental group drawn from the depart- 
ments participating in the program. They are animal science, biochemistry, 
entomology, food animal and equine medicine, poultry science, psychology, (vet- 
erinary) anatomy, physiological sciences and radiology and zoology. The pro- 
gram emphasizes the comparative approach implicit in this type of organization. 

Experimental facilities of the above departments are available for physiologi- 
cal research, as are such special facilities as the Electron Microscope Center and 
the Nuclear Service Facility. Experimental animals available cover a wide 
range, from insects and other invertebrates to large mammals. 

In addition to courses in physiology, majors in the program are expected to take 
selected courses in biochemistry and cell biology. Minors are usually chosen from 
such fields as biochemistry, entomology, genetics, immunology, veterinary med- 
ical sciences, statistics, toxicology and zoology. A strong basic knowledge in one 
of these areas is essential. 

Graduate students enrolled as physiology majors are located in the department 
of their major professor and may participate in departmental activities. 

Prerequisites for admission include a year of physics and organic chemistry, 
one course in biochemistry and physiology. The Aptitude Test of the Graduate 
Record Examination is required and the Advanced Tests in biology and chemis- 
try are desirable. 

Financial assistance for qualified students in the form of research assistant- 
ships, fellowships and traineeships is available through participating depart- 
ments. Prospective students may obtain further information by writing to any 
one of the graduate faculty listed above or to the Coordinator, Physiology Pro- 
gram, Box 7608, N. C. State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7608. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PHY (ANS) 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. 3(3-0) S. (See animal 
science.) 

PHY (ZO) 503 General Physiology I. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing; the following courses 
are recommended: ZO U21 or equivalent, BCH U51 or equivalent, a yr. of physics. 3(3-0) F. 
The general principles of homeostasis discussed, emphasizing the importance of integra- 
tive action. The following systems studied: muscular, cardiovascular and nervous systems. 

Grossfeld 

PHY (ZO) 504 General Physiology II. Preq.: PHY (ZO) 503. 3(3-0) S. The general 
principiesof homeostasis discussed, emphasizing the importance of integrative action. The 
following systems studied: alimentary, renal, respiratory and endocrine systems. 

Grossfeld 

PHY (ZO) 513 Comparative Physiology. 3(3-0) S. (See zoology.) 

PHY (BCH) 553 Physiological Biochemistry. 3(3-0) S. (See biochemistry.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 263 

PHY (MB, PO, VMS) 556 Immunogenetics. 3(2-2) F. (See poultry science.) 

PHY (ANS) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. 3(3-0) F. (See animal science.) 

PHY 590 Special Problems in Physiology. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Ar- 
ranged. F,S. Graduate Staff 

PHY (ZO) 595 Seminar in Biology of Reproduction. 2(2-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See zoology.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PHY (VMS) 632 Comparative Physiology of the Digestive System. .3(3-0) Every yr. 
(See veterinary medical sciences.) 

PHY 690 Physiology Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) S. Graduate Staff 

PHY 695 Selected Topics in Physiology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-U. Graduate Staff 

PHY 699 Physiological Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

Graduate Staff 

COURSE FROM ASSOCIATED DEPARTMENTS 

BCH 551 General Biochemistry L 

OTHER SUPPORTING COURSES AVAILABLE 

Other supporting course are available in biochemistry, biomathematics. ento- 
mology, genetics, microbiology, nutrition, poultry science, psychology, statistics, 
toxicology, veterinary medical sciences and zoology. 

Certain courses on the interface between physiology and engineering may be 
taken after consultation with advisor and the instructors concerned. 

Plant Pathology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. L. Klarman, Head 

Professor D. M. Benson, (Graduate Studies Coordinator 

Professors: J. L. Apple, C. W. Averre III, K. R. Barker, D. F. Bateman, M. K. 
Beute, E. B. Cowling, C. B. Davey, H. E. Duncan, E. Echandi, G. V. Gooding 
Jr., L. F. Grand, J. S. Huang, R. K. Jones, M. P. Levi, L. T. Lucas, C. E. Main, R. 
D. Milholland, J. W. Moyer, D. P. Schmitt, P. B. Shoemaker, T. B. Sutton, H. H. 
Triantaphyllou, N. N. Winstead; Professors (USDA): A. S. Heagle, R. A. Rei- 
nert, H. W. Spurr Jr.; Visiting Professor: C. S. Hodges Jr.; Professors Emeriti: 
R. Aycock, C. N. Clayton, D. E. Ellis, T. T. Hebert, N. T. Powell, J. P. Ross, J. N. 
Sasser, D. L. Strider, F. L. Wellman, J. C. Wells; Associate Professors: J. E. 
Bailey, R. L Bruck, C. L. Campbell, M. E. Daub, W. M. Hagler Jr., B. C. 
Haning, G. A. Payne, D. F. Ritchie, H. D. Shew, C. G. Van Dyke; Assistant 



264 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Professors: J . Beagle-Ristaino, P. B. Lindgren, S. A. Lommel, C. H. Opperman; 
Assistant Professors (USDA): S. Leath, S. M. Schneider, S. R. Shafer, R. G. 
Upchurch; Extension Specialist: T. A. Melton 

Plant pathology has major research programs in disease management, epide- 
miology, mycology, molecular biology, nematology, virology, biology of soil- 
borne pathogens, physiology of pathogenesis and general plant pathology. Pro- 
grams leading to the Master of Agriculture, Master of Life Sciences (both 
non-thesis). Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered. 
Requirements for these three degrees follow University policies: 30 credit hours 
and thesis for the M.S. degree; 36 for the Master of Agriculture and Master of 
Life Sciences degrees. The latter afford students an opportunity for general 
education with a major emphasis in plant pathology course work and subject 
matter. 

Courses and number of hours taken by Ph.D. candidates are determined by the 
student's interest and background in consultation with an advisory committee. 
Strong foundation courses in botanical science as well as mathematics, biochem- 
istry, chemistry and soil science are prerequisite, however, for admission to the 
Ph.D. degree. Students who enroll in any graduate program should have 
achieved a "B" average in the undergraduate major. A diagnostic examination is 
utilized in placing incoming Ph.D. students in appropriate graduate courses. 

Opportunities for employment include research, extension and teaching 
appointments at Land-Grant colleges or universities and with the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. Agribusiness and biotechnology industries also employs 
plant pathologists in research, promotion and service. Plant pathologists often 
participate in overseas assignments in developing countries through interna- 
tional and federal organizations, as well as in commercial enterprises. 

Separate laboratories fully equipped and staffed for research in molecular 
biology, nematology, virology, soil-borne pathogens, physiology of pathogenesis 
and biochemical problems are available. Microcomputers, library, mycological 
herbarium, photography laboratory, and an interdepartmental electron micro- 
scope center are additional features available in the department. A faculty 
comprised of more than 50 scientists with varied interests provide for in-depth 
training in all of these areas. 

The department has greenhouse facilities and access to controlled environmen- 
tal growth chambers in the phytotron. Student participation in the Plant Disease 
Clinic provides experience in the diagnosis of all types of plant diseases. 

North Carolina exhibits a wide range of soil types and climatic areas. Large 
acreages are planted to a variety of field, vegetable and ornamental crops, as well 
as forest trees. Special facilities for experimental work on diseases of these crops 
are found at 16 permanent research stations located throughout the state. 

Graduate assistantships are funded by the Agricultural Research Service, the 
Agricultural Foundation and other agencies. Levels of stipends are adjusted to 
the previous training and experience of the recipients and are competitive with 
those offered by other Land-Grant universities. Special supplements to stipends 
and fellowships are available on a competitive basis for outstanding students. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSE 
PP 4 1 5 Plant Disease Control. Preq.: PP 315. 3(2-3) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 265 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PP 501 Phytopathology I. Preq.: PP 315 or equivalent. 5(3-6) F. Basic concepts and 
principles of fungal and bacterial plant diseases. Emphasis on history, classification, 
etiology, pathogenesis, pathogen biology and genetics of host-parasite interaction. Labora- 
tory emphasis on basis methodology of fungal and bacterial plant pathogens and develop- 
ment of an independent research project. Shew 

PP 503 Plant Disease Diagnoses. Preqs.: PP 501 and 502A,B,C or equivalent. M2-6) 
Sum. Alt. yrs. Diagnoses of plant diseases in the field and laboratory, and operational 
aspects of a plant disease clinic stressed. Frequent field trips to experiment stations and 
private farms provide opportunities for field observation of plant disease, plant disease 
research and diagnosis. Laboratory studies emphasize identification and major sources of 
descriptive information of plant pathogens and abiotic agents. Grand, Jones 

PP 515 Epidemiology and Plant Disease Control. Preq.: PP 315 or PP 318. 3(3-0) S. 
Consideration of fundamental concepts and principles of epidemiology as they apply to 
modern strategies of plant disease control. Special consideration given to evaluation of 
current techniques for control of fungal, bacterial, viral and nematode pathogens in an 
integrated crop protection system. A term paper required to integrate concepts and princi- 
ples of disease management for a specific crop. Sutton 

PP520 Phytopathology II— Nema,tology. Preq.: PP 3 15 or equivalent. 2(3-6)S. Lectures 
and laboratory techniques in plant pathology presented as a series of five-week mini- 
courses. Students may enroll for one or all of the series. Each minicourse consists of 
lectures on principles and laboratories involving experimental techniques fundamental to 
the study of nematodes and viruses as plant pathogens and analyses of plant disease 
epidemics. Taught first 5 weeks of semester. Barker 

PP 521 Phytopathology II— Virology. Preq.: PP 315 or equivalent. 2(3-6) S. Lectures 
and laboratory techniques in plant pathology presented as a series of five-week mini- 
courses. Students may enroll for one or all of the series. Each minicourse consists of 
lectures on principles and laboratories involving experimental techniques fundamental to 
the study of nematodes and viruses as plant pathogens and analyses of plant disease 
epidemics. Taught second 5 weeks of semester. Moyer 

PP 522 Phytopathology II— Epidemiology. Preq.: PP 315 or equivalent 2(3-6) S. Lec- 
tures and laboratory techniques in plant pathology presented as a series of five-week 
minicourses. Students may enroll for one or all of the series. Each minicourse consists of 
lectures on principles and laboratories involving experimental techniques fundamental to 
the study of nematodes and viruses as plant pathogens and analyses of plant disease 
epidemics. Taught third 5 weeks of semester. Campbell 

PP (MB, BO) 575 The Fungi. 3(3-0) F. (See botany.) 

PP (MB, BO) 576 The Fungi— Lab. 1(0-3) F. (See botany.) 

PP 595 Special Problems in Plant Pathology. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged, Max. 6. 
Investigation of special problems in plant pathology not related to a thesis problem. The 
investigations may consist of original research and/or literature survey. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PP 604 Morphology and Taxonomy of Nematodes. Preqs.: PP 502A, CI. 3(1-6) S. Alt. 
yrs. A study of the morphology, anatomy and taxonomy of nematodes with emphasis on the 
identification of important plant-parasitic genera. Exercises include preparation of semi- 
permanent and permanent nematode mounts. Triantaphyllou 

PP605 Molecular Biology of Plant Viruses. Pre9S..PP 50:25, BCH451 or 551. U2-6)S. 
Alt. yrs. An in-depth study of plant viruses with emphasis on the relationship between viral 



266 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

structure and function. Areas covered include infection, replication, genomic expression, 
encapsidation and transmission. Laboratory introduces students to contemporary molecu- 
lar techniques. Lommel 

PP 608 History of Phytopathology- Preqs.: PP315, CI. 1(1-0) F. Alt. yrs. Developmentof 
the science of phytopathology from its early beginnings to the early part of the 20th century. 

Campbell 

PP 611 Advanced Plant Nematology. Preqs.: PP 60U. U(3-3) F. Alt. yrs. Nematode 
biology, genetics, physiology, molecular biology, ecology, embryogenesis, post-embryonic 
development, gametogenesis, cytology, reproduction, sexuality, evolution, behavior, host- 
parasite relationships, mechanisms of pathogenesis and resistance, interactions with other 
pathogens and impacts on crop performance. Laboratory exercises, research projects and 
techniques. Barker, Opperman, Triantaphyllou 

PP 612 Plant Pathogenesis. Preqs.: PP 501, BCH 551, BO 551, CI. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. 
Infection processes, alterations in photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen metabolism, vascu- 
lar function and growth regulator function are considered. The biochemical nature of the 
weapons utilized by pathogens in pathogenic attack and the defensive mechanisms 
employed by the hosts in resisting attack and the resultant dynamic interactions are 
studied. Huang 

PP 615 Botanical Epidemiology. Preqs.: PP501, 502 or CI; Coreq.: ST 511. U(2-6) S. Alt. 
yrs. Advanced study of the dynamics of plant disease epidemics in relation to agricultural 
crop production and forestry systems. Emphasis placed upon epidemiological concepts and 
principles, pathogen and host dynamics, disease forecasting, geographic distribution of 
pathogens, crop-loss assessment and the development of theoretical and practical disease- 
management strategies. Bruck, Campbell, Main 

PP (CS, GN, HS) 618 Breeding for Pest Resistance. 2f2-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See crop 
science.) 

PP (BO) 625 Advanced Mycology. Preq.: PP 575 or CI. M2-6) F. Alt. yrs. An in-depth 
treatment of major groups of fungi. Aspects of taxonomy, nomenclature, developmental 
morphology, genetics, host-parasite relations, physiology and ecology presented. Cardinal 
characteristics of selected fungi representing the major groups determined. Field observa- 
tions and collecting also required. Grand 

PP 628 Soilborne Plant Pathogens. Preq.: PP501. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. An in-depth study of 
the ecology of soilborne fungal and bacterial pathogens that induce root and wilt diseases in 
plants. Concepts and principles including but not limited to the rhizosphere, inoculum 
potential, soil fungistasis, survival, root disease models and biological control. Benson 

PP 650 Colloquium in Plant Pathology. Preq.: PP502 or CI. 1(1-0) S. Group discussions 
and individual presentations explore institutional operations in universities, research 
laboratories, international centers and industry. Sources of funding through appropria- 
tions, research grants and industry cooperators examined. Criteria for evaluating the 
performance of professional employees, the role of scientific journals and professional 
societies, as well as public responsibilities considered. Klarman, Graduate Staff 

PP 690 Seminar in Plant Pathology. Preq.: Consent of seminar chairman. 1(1-0) F,S. 
Discu.ssion of assigned phytopathological topics. Ritchie 

PP 699 Research in Plant Pathology. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Arranged. 
Original research in plant pathology. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 267 

Plant Physiology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. C. Fites, Coordinator 

Professors: F. T. Corbin, J. S. Huang, W. A. Jackson, C. S. Levings III, D. M. 
Pharr, C. D. Raper, E. C. Sisler, W. F. Thompson, R. J. Volk; Professors 
(USDA): S. C. Huber, D. W. Israel, D. E. Moreland, R. F. Wilson; Associate 
Professors: H. V. Amerson, W. F. Boss, M. M. Peet, S. L. Spiker; Associate 
Professor (USDA): J. M. Anderson; Assistant Professors: R. S. Boston, M. A. 
Conkling, R. Wells; Assistant Professors (USDA): K. 0. Burkey , T. W. Rufty Jr. 

The Plant Physiology Program is an interdepartmental offering. Although not 
a formal degree program, students may elect to major or minor in the Plant 
Physiology Program at both the master's and Ph.D. levels. Students entering the 
program should have appropriate knowledge in plant biology, chemistry, 
mathematics and physics. Some formal training in genetics, physical chemistry 
and statistics is normally expected. 

When majoring in plant physiology, students will be closely affiliated with the 
same department as their major professor. As such, they will be required to meet 
respective departmental requirements for teaching, written and oral examina- 
tions, and seminar attendance. Departments currently participating in this pro- 
gram are: biochemistry, botany, crop science, forestry, genetics, horticultural 
science, plant pathology and soil science. The chair or co-chair of the student's 
advisory committee must be a.member of the Plant Physiology Faculty. 

This program is administered by the Plant Physiology Executive Committee. 
Additional information about the program may be obtained by writing to one of 
the listed faculty members or to: Coordinator, Plant Physiology Program, Box 
7612, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7612. 

Course requirements for this program include two core areas as summarized 
below. Students majoring in the program are encouraged to develop background 
training in all of the indicated courses, while those minoring in plant physiology 
must meet the minimum requirements for each core area. 

Group I (At least two of the listed courses) 

BO 510 Plant Anatomy 

BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I 

BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II 

Group II 
BCH 540 Proteins 

At least two of the following courses: 

BCH 541 Nucleic Acids 

BCH 542 Metabolism 

or 

BCH 544 Intermediary Metabolism 

BCH 543 Biochemical Regulatory Processes 

BCH 555 Plant Biochemistry 



268 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Political Science and Public Administration 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor M. S. Soroos, Head 

Associate Professor H. G. Kebschull, Graduate Administrator for Political 
Science 

Associate Professor D. M. Daley, Graduate Administrator for Public Affairs 
Program 

Professors: E. S. Fairchild, G. D. Garson, A. Holtzman, E. R. Rubin, D. W. 
Stewart, J. 0. Williams; Professors Emeriti: W. J. Block, J. T. Caldwell; Asso- 
ciate Professors: C. K. Coe, R. H. Dorff, J. H. Gilbert, S. H. Kessler, J. P. Mastro, 
J. M. McClain, E. O'Sullivan, J. E. Swiss, M. L. Vasu; Associate Professor 
Emeritus: K. S. Petersen; Assistant Professor: T. V. Reid; Visiting Assistant 
Professor: G. C. Sims; Lecturer: J. B. Rosch 

The Department of Political Science and Public Administration offers pro- 
grams leading to the Master of Public Affairs degree and the Master of Arts 
degree. 

A candidate for admission to either program must have demonstrated an 
aptitude for graduate study as indicated by the Graduate Record Examination; 
the student may also be required to take certain undergraduate courses to make 
up any deficiencies that may exist in the undergraduate record. 

The Master of Public Affairs degree requires completion of a 41-semester-hour 
professional program for persons who are now or hope to be employed by 
government or by a government-related private enterprise or association. An 
internship in a government agency is required for persons with no previous 
public sector experience. 

The program requires 31 hours to be selected from courses offered by the 
Department of Political Science and Public Administration, including 16 hours 
of core courses. Students may specialize in financial management, human 
resource management, data management, association/non-profit management, 
urban management, environmental resources management or administration of 
justice. The remaining hours may be taken in another discipline, such as econom- 
ics and business, education, industrial engineering, psychology, recreation, soci- 
ology and statistics, or as an interdisciplinary sequence of courses. 

Students who enroll in the program should have completed twelve hours in the 
social sciences as undergraduates and have achieved a B average in the last two 
years of school. PA 571, a core course, has a statistics prerequisite. 

The Master of Arts degree requires each candidate to complete 30 hours of 
graduate work including three hours in Research Methods and Analysis (PS 
571). The candidate must concentrate (18-21 hours, including thesis) in two major 
fields of political science. Major fields are to be selected from the following: 
political theory, American politics, comparative politics, international relations 
and public administration. A disciplinary minor of 9 to 12 hours outside the 
Department of Political Science and Public Administration is required. A stu- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 269 

dent's work in a minor field must constitute a unified pattern and must con- 
tribute to one or both of the student's major fields. 

In either program the student selects a graduate committee chairperson for the 
preparation of a program of study which shall be subject to the approval of two 
other committee members, including one from outside the Department of Politi- 
cal Science and Public Administration. 

Comprehensive written and oral examinations are required of every candidate 
for both degrees. In addition, a candidate for the Master of Arts degree must 
demonstrate reading proficiency in one modern language (normally German, 
French, Spanish or Russian) or a research skill and must write a thesis in one of 
his or her major areas. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PS 401 American Parties and Interest Groups. 3(3-0) F. 

PS 402 Campaigns and Elections in the American Political System. Preq.: PS 201. 
3(3-0) F,S. 

PS 406 Politics and Policies of American State Governments. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

PS 408 Urban Politics. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PS 411 Public Opinion and the Media. Preq.: Six hrs. of social science. 3(3-0) S. 

PS 431 International Law and Organization. 3(3-0) F. 

PS 437 National Security Policy. Preq.: PS 331. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

PS 446 Comparative Communist Systems. Preq.: PS 3U or 332. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PS 447 Political Development. Preq.: Six hrs. of PS. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

PS 462 Seminar in Political Theory. Preq.: PS 361. 3(3-0) S. 

PS 498 Special Topics in Political Science. Preq.: Six hrs. of PS. 3-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PA 505 Administrative Law. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) S. Case law of 
the exercise of administrative power, judicial and legislative control of administrative 
action, legal rights of public employers and legal procedures of administrative tribunals. 

McClain 

PA 511 Public Administration. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing including 12 hrs. 
in PS, grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A general survey of the field of public 
administration, examining formal and informal organizations, processes of administra- 
tion, the political environment of administration and administrative responsibility and 
accountability. Graduate Staff 

PA 513 Financial Management in the Public Sector. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS 
status. 3(3-0) F. This course surveys financial practices and concepts in the public sector. 
Topics include: public sector accounting, financial information systems, revenue projec- 
tions, cash management and debt management. Case-based applications emphasized. 

Coe 



270 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PA 515 Administration of Criminal Justice. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing 
including 12 hrs. of PS, grad. standing or PBS stattis. Credit for both PS 1^15 and PA 515 is 
not allowed. 3(3-0) F. A study of politics and administration in the American criminal 
justice system. The interrelationships between ideology, organization and policy outputs 
emphasized in the analysis of major problems confronting the system today. Topics 
included: intergovernmental relations, discretionary justice, impact of judicial decisions on 
criminal justice administration and management trends in criminal justice bureaucracies. 

Fairchild 

PA 516 Public Policy Analysis. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing including 12 hrs. 
of PS, grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Course covers methods and techniques 
of analyzing, developing and evaluating public policies and programs. Emphasis given to 
benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness analysis and concepts of economic efficiency, equity and 
distribution. Methods include problem solving, decision making and case studies. Exam- 
ples used in human resource, environmental and regulatory policy. Swiss 

PA 518 Organization Design. Preq.: Advancedundergrad. standing including 12hrs. of 
PS, grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) S. An examination of contemporary approaches to 
organization design, including organization development, sociotechnical systems analysis 
and various forms of organizational participation ranging from human relations to self- 
management models. Issues in personnel administration emphasized in relation to public 
management and government structure. Graduate Staff 

PA 520 Environmental Policy. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing including 12 hrs. 
of PS, grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. This course focuses on the formation and 
impact of environmental policy in the United States. Decision-making processes at all 
levels of government examined. Comparisons made between political, economic, social and 
technological policy alternatives. Emphasis given to the application of policy analysis in 
environmental assessment, and theoretical perspectives on the nature of the environmental 
crisis considered. Graduate Staff 

PA 570 Research Methods Computing Lab. Preqs.: Advanced undergrad. standing 
including 12 hrs. of PS, grad. standing or PBS status and an introductory course in ST. 
1(0-2) F,S. A one-hour computing lab that complements the public administration curricu- 
lum. Introduction to computing on both mainframe and microcomputer. Includes 
TSO/QED statistical packages, SPSS data structures and microcomputing software. 

Graduate Staff 

PA 571 Research Methods and Analysis. Preqs.: Advancedundergrad. standing includ- 
ing 12 hrs. of PS, grad. standing or PBS status and an introductory course in ST. 3(3-0) F,S. 
A focus on the behavioral approach to the study of political and administrative behavior. 
Topics include the philosophy of social science; experimental, quasi and non-experimental 
research design; data collection techniques; basic statistical analysis with computer 
applications. O'Sullivan, Vasu 

PA 573 Computer Applications in Public AUsLirs. Preqs.: ST 507; CSC 462 or PS 371 or 

PA 571. 3(1-6) S,Sum. The methodology, data analysis techniques and computer-based 
skills necessary to conduct and manage applied research. The course focuses on the analysis 
and processing of data through the medium of conventional computer software frequently 
used in the field, i.e., SPSS, SAS. Graduate Staff 

PA 574 Data Management in Public Administration. Preqs.: PS 37i or PA 573 and 

previous coursework or experience in public administration. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to 
managerial applications of data management in public budgeting, public personnel and 
public pol icy analysis. Microcomputers used to construct data bases and analytic models in 
these areas. Garson 

PA 580 Independent Study. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS. 1-6. F,S,Sum. Independent 
research or readings by graduate students under the direct supervision of individual 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 271 

faculty members. Students' work evaluated, based on reports, papers and exams, with 
letter grading (A, B, C, D, NC) employed. Graduate Staff 

PA 590 Readings and Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S,Sum. To enable gradu- 
ate students to pursue a subject of particular interest to them by doing extensive readings or 
research in that subject under direct, individual faculty supervision. Graduate Staff 

PA 598 Special Topics in Public Administration. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing 
including 12 hrs. in PS, grad. standing or PBS stattis. 1-6 F,S,Su7n. Detailed investigation 
of contemporary topics in the fields of public administration. Topic and mode of study 
determined by program faculty. Graduate Staff 

PS 502 The Legislative Process. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing including 12 hrs. 
of PS, grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) S. A study of the formulation of public policy 
from the institutional and behavioral viewpoints. Important current legislative problems 
at the congressional and state legislative levels will be selected and will serve as a basis for 
analyzing the legislative process. Holtzman 

PS 506 American Constitutional Theory. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing includ- 
ing 12 hrs. of PS, grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. Basic constitutional doctrines, 
including fundamental law, judicial review, individual rights and political privileges and 
national and state power. Special attention given to the application of these doctrines to the 
regulation of business, agriculture and labor and to the rights safeguarded by the First, 
Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution. Rubin 

PS 507 Constitutional Theory IL Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing including 12 hrs. 
of PS, grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F,S. A continuation of PS 506, but may be elected 
separately. An examination of leading constitutional cases, especially in the fields of civil 
liberties and individual rights and the writings of leading commentators. Reid, Rubin 

PS 514 PublicFinance. Preg.; £"5^05. 5('5-0jF. A survey of the theories and practices of 
governmental taxing, spending and borrowing, including intergovernmental relationships 
and administrative practices and problems. Graduate Staff 

PS 531 International Law. Preq.: (yrad. or advanced undergrad. standing. 3(3-0) Every 
yr. Sources and subjects of international law, domestic and international jurisdictions, 
judicial settlement, legal and illegal uses offeree and the substance of law in selected policy 
ares. Graduate Staff 

PS 533 Global Problems and Policy. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. standing including 12 
hrs. of PS, grad. standing or PBS status. Credit for both PS U33 and PS 533 is not allowed. 
3(3-0) F. International policy processes and policy responses to problems of global scope 
including the role of international law. Consideration given to economic development, 
human rights and other policy problems selected for specific semesters. Independent 
research on a global policy problem of student's choice. Soroos 

PS 541 Military Coups and Regimes in the Third World. Preqs.: Advanced undergrad. 
standing, grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. The seizure and exercise of political power 
by military forces in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Causes and techniques of military 
coups, with emphasis on the social, economic and political policies of military regimes. Case 
studies within the context of theories about the political role of the military. Kebschull 

PS 542 Western European Politics. Preq.: Nine hrs. of PS, grad. standing or PBS statics. 
Credit in both PS UU2 and PS 5U2 is not allowed. 3(3-0) F. Analysis of political institutions 
and processes in selected Western Europen states and the European community and of 
major social, economic and political issues confronting European societies. Kebschull 

PS 545 Comparative Systems of Law and Justice. Preq.: grad. standing. Credit in both 
PSUU5 and PS 5U5 is not allowed. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of legal culture and administration of 
justice in Western European, Third World and Communist political systems, with a view to 



272 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

comparison with the American system of law and justice. Emphasis on the impact of legal 
ideology on such topics as the nature of crime, political justice, police administration, 
corrections and judicial processes. Fairchild 

PS 571 Resesirch Methods Siud Ana.\y sis. Preqs.: Advanced undergrad. standing includ- 
ing 12 hrs. of PS, grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F,S. A survey of methods used in 
behavioral research as applied to the field of political science: elements of empirical theory, 
research design, measurement of variables, sampling procedures, data courses, techniques 
of data collection, statistical analysis, qualitative methodologies and the presentation of 
research findings. Soroos, Vasu 

PS 590 Readings and Research. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 1-3 F,S,Sum. 
Graduate students pursue a subject of particular interest to them by doing extensive 
readings or research in that subject under direct, individual faculty supervision. 

Graduate Staff 

PS 598 Special Topics in Political Science. Preq.: Six hrs. of PS. 1-6 F,S. Detailed 
investigation of a topic. Topic and mode of study determined by the student and a faculty 
member. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PA 608 Seminar in Urban Management. Preqs.: Grad. standing or Management Devel- 
opment Certificate Program and six hrs. of 500-level course work. 3(3-0) F. A seminar 
focusing on the analytical techniques and managerial principles required for policy forma- 
tion and implementation in a complex urban governmental environment. Specific topics 
include: urban planning and community development, housing, intergovernmental rela- 
tions, organizational roles and decision making, budgeting and selected urban services (for 
example: police, transportation). Graduate Staff 

PA 611 Seminar in Public Personnel Management. Preqs.: Grad. standing or Man- 
agement Development Certificate Program and six hrs. of 500-level course work. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Examines the major issues in public sector personnel management. Among topics consi- 
dered: staffing, position classification, compensation, affirmative action, performance 
review and appraisal, patronage, training, career development, employee assistance, 
unionization and rights of public employees. Daley, Sims 

PA 612 The Budgetary Process. Preqs.: (jrad. standing or Management Development 
Certificate Program and six hrs. of 500-level course work. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course 
examines generalized budgetary process used at all levels of government in the United 
States. Understanding of the process based upon comprehension of the institutions 
involved, the roles of politicians and professionals and the objectives of budgetary systems. 
The course also focuses upon budgetary reforms and on Planning-Programming-Bud- 
getary and Zero-Based Budgeting as management tools. Coe 

PA 613 Government and Planning. Preqs.: (rrad. standing or Management Develop- 
ment Certificate Program and six hrs. of 500-level course work. 3(3-0) F,Sum. A study of the 
planning function at all levels of government in the United States, with particular attention 
to the problenis posed for planning by the rapid growth of metropolitan areas. An overview 
of community development, urban spatial structure, housing economics and land use 
planning. Vasu 

PA 614 Management Systems. Preqs.: (yrad. standing or Management Development 
Certificate Program and six hrs. of 500-level course work. 3(3-0) S,Sum. An examination, 
through case studies and applied methodology, of various management systems and man- 
agement techniques. Among the topics considered: differences between market and non- 
market organizations, financial management systems, quantitative decision-making 
approaches, planning techniques such as CPM and PERT, MBO and productivity systems. 

O'Sullivan, Swiss 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 273 

PA 616 Seminar in Program Evaluation. Preqs.: Grad. standing or Management 
Development Certificate Program and a grad. course in research methods. 3(3-0) F,S. The 
course combines seminar and field research techniques to study the evaluation of public 
programs. Focus on political and administrative problems associated with program eva- 
luation. The availability and appropriateness of various quantitative methodologies also 
examined. Seminar concepts applied through evaluative projects conducted for public 
agencies. O'Sullivan 

PA 617 Seminar in Organization Theory. Preqs.: Grad. standing or Management 
Development Certificate Program and six krs. of 500-level course work. 3(3-0) F,S. The 
seminar examines major conceptual frameworks developed to understand organizational 
behavior. Topics stressed include motivation, leadership, group dynamics, communication, 
socio-technical systems, work design and organizational learning. The emphasis on apply- 
ing theories and concepts to public sector organizations. Daley, Vasu 

PA 619 Intergovernmental Relations in the United States. Preqs.: Grad. standing or 
Management Development Certificate Program and six hrs. of 500-level course ivork. 3(3-0) S. 
The course examines distinctive features of intergovernmental relations in the United 
States. Topics stressed include historical adaptations of federalism, the emerging role of 
the administrator, contemporary trends in intergovernmental relations and assessment of 
contemporary trends from federal, state and local perspectives. Coe 

PA 620 Environmental Administration. Preqs.: Grad. standing or Management Devel- 
opment Certificate Program and six hrs. of 500-level course work. 3(3-0) S. A review and 
investigation of the major environmental management systems utilized to plan, develop 
and implement environmental programs. Graduate Staff 

PA 621 Collective Negotiations in the Public Service. Preqs.: Grad. standing or Man- 
agement Development Certificate Program and six hrs. of 500-level course work. 3(3-0) Sum. 
This course includes intensive consideration of the background of the collective negotia- 
tions movement; analysis of key policy issues, such as bargaining rights and the use of strike 
weapons; framework for collective negotiations; scope and conduct of negotiations; impasse 
resolution; grievance procedure. Graduate Staff 

PA 691 Internship in Public Affairs. Preq.: Minimum 9 hrs. graduate work. 1-6 
F,S,Sum. This course exposes the student to the environment and value systems of the 
public organization through a supervised work experience. It involves the application of 
substantive knowledge and analytical skills to organizational problems. Credit will vary 
with the nature of the work experience. Graduate Staff 

PS 631 Seminar in International Relations. Preq.: Six hrs. of 500-level course work. 
3(3-0) F,S.Sum. May be taken for up to six hours credit. An in-depth examination of a topic 
within the larger field of international politics to be selected by the instructor for each 
semester from subjects pertaining to interstate relations, international law and organiza- 
tion, regional politics, foreign and security policy or global issues. Students undertake a 
substantial independent research project. Soroos 

PS 64 1 Seminar in Comparative Politics. Preqs.: One course in comparative politics and 
one course in PS methodology or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. This seminar opens with a survey of the 
problems and methods of comparative political analysis, after which students assigned a 
specific, limited subject to be examined within the framework of a systematic, analytical 
scheme appropriate to the topic. Specific topics drawn from the subjects of political 
ideologies, political groups, political elites and decision-making institutions and processes. 

Kebschull 

PS 691 Internship in Political Science. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F,S,Sum. This course 
exposes the student to the environmental and value systems of public organizations through 
a supervised work experience. Graduate Staff 



274 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PS 696 Seminar in Politics. Preq.: Advanced grad. standing. 2-U F,S. An independent 
advanced research course in selected problems of government and politics. The problems 
chosen in accordance with the needs and desires of the students registered for the course. 

Graduate Staff 

PS 699 Research in Politics. Preqs.: Grad. standing and approval of adviser. Credits 
Arranged. F,S. Research for writing the master's thesis. Graduate Staff 



Poultry Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. B. Havenstein, Head 

Professors: J. T. Brake, T. A. Carter, V. L. Christensen, R. E. Cook, W. E. 
Donaldson, F. W. Edens, J. D. Garlich, P. B. Hamilton, C. H. Hill, F. T. Jones, 
C. R. Parkhurst, J. C. H. Shih, T. D. Slopes; Adjunct Professors: D. I. McRee, J. 
P. Thaxton; Professors Emeriti: E. W. Glazener, J. R. Harris; Associate Profes- 
sors: J. B. Carey, W. M. Hagler Jr., J. F. Ort; Assistant Professors: F. R. Ferket, 
M. A. Qureshi, D. V. Rives, S. E. Scheideler, R. M. Shuma.n; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: R. P. Gildersleeve, J. W. Laskey 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professor; H. R. Ball Jr.; Associate Professors: W. J. Groom Jr., B. W. Sheldon 

The Department of Poultry Science offers the Master of Science degree. Doc- 
toral programs are offered in the disciplines of microbiology, physiology, genet- 
ics and nutrition. 

The department occupies Scott Hall, containing well-equipped laboratories, 
animal rooms and offices. Additional research facilities are located on the Uni- 
versity farms and the Piedmont Research Station. 

The Dearstyne Avian Research Center, a three-building complex, is used in 
connection with special research projects related to disease resistance and treat- 
ment of various pathological conditions. The complex is made up of animal 
isolation rooms, biochemical laboratories and related facilities. 

The research program is comprehensive and includes fundamental studies in 
genetics, microbiology, nutrition, pathology, immunology, molecular biology, 
toxicology and physiology. In addition, investigation of problems of more practi- 
cal urgency is undertaken when appropriate. 

The demand for men and women with advanced training in poultry science is 
far greater than the supply. Opportunities exist for graduates in research and 
teaching in universities, in government and in private industry. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PO 405 Avian Physiology. Preq.: CH 220. M3-3) F. 

PO 410 Production and Management of Game Birds in Confinement. Preq.: PO 201. 
3(2-3) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 275 

PO (ANS, NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition. Preqs.: CH 220 or both 221 and 223. 3(3-0) 
F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PO 505 Physiological Aspects of Poultry Management. Preqs.: PO 201, PO WS or 
grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Application of physiological principles to modern poultry man- 
agement. Poultry physiology related to management topics including nutrition, housing, 
ventilation, disease, heat stress and lighting programs. Brake 

PO (GN) 520 Poultry Breeding. Preq.: GNill. 3(2-2) S. Application of genetic princi- 
ples to poultry breeding, considering physical traits and physiological characteristics. 

Shuman 

PO (ZO) 524 Comparative Endocrinology. Preq.: ZO U21 or equivalent. M3-3) S. Basic 
concepts of endocrinology, including functions of major endocrine glands involved in 
processes of growth, metabolism and reproduction. Slopes 

PO (MB, PHY, VMS) 556 Immunogenetics. Preq.: MB 501 C or MB 551 or CI. 3(2-2) F. 
Basic concepts of the immune system. Genetic basis of the immune response including 
immunoglobulin genetics, major histocompatibility complexes and their role in the 
immune response, the molecular basis of the immune system and effector mechanisms. 

Qureshi 

PO 590 Graduate Seminar in Poultry Science. 1(1-0) F. Preparation for research, 
research perspectives, rising concerns in poultry production, orientation for graduate 
studies in poultry science. Required of all graduate students in the Department of Poultry 
Science. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PO (ANS, NTR) 605 Mineral Metabolism. 3(3-0) F. (See animal science.) 

PO 698 Special Problems in Poultry Science. Preq.: Grad. standing. Maximum 6 F,S. 
Specific problems of study assigned in various phases of poultry science. 

Graduate Staff 

PO 699 Poultry Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. A max. of six credits 
is allowed towards a master's degree. F,S. Appraisal of present research; critical study of 
some particular problem involving original investigation. Problems in poultry breeding, 
disease, endocrinology, hematology, microbiology, nutrition or physiology. 

Graduate Staff 

Product/Visual Design 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor H. Khachatxx)rian, Program Director 

Professors: V. M. Foote, A. S. Lowrey; Professors Emeriti: G. L. Bireline Jr., J. H. 
Cox; Associate Professors: A. V. Cooke, R. A. Donaldson, C. E. Joyner, M. S. 
Lange, P. L. Middleton, S. D. Wilchins, J. M. Wittkamp; Assistant Professors: 
S. K. Ater, D. S. Chapin 



276 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Department of Product/Visual Design offers courses of study leading to a 
Master of Product Design degree with three distinct concentrations: Product 
Design, Visual Design and Textile Design. 

Product design deals with all aspects of machine-made products and their 
relationship to people and the environment. The discipline therefore involves 
three major research and design activities: human behavior, the human/product 
relationship and the product itself. In the School of Design's Product Design 
curriculum, the emphasis is on the designer's responsibility in enhancing the 
quality of human life. Students learn to consider all the effects of a product, from 
its conception through production, and eventually its use. 

The graduate curriculum prepares students for professional careers in pro- 
duct research, development and design. Core and elective courses focus on prob- 
lem identification, problem-solving methods, communication skills and the 
nature of materials and production processes. 

In the studio, students use this knowledge to solve real-world design problems 
requiring research, creativity and the application of newly acquired technical 
skills. Work on these projects helps students consider essential design factors 
such as form, safety, physiology, materials/manufacturing processes, color, tex- 
ture, cost and maintenance. 

Graduates of the Product/Visual Design Department are working in a variety 
of fields, including furniture, housewares, appliances, transportation, machine 
tools, medical and electrical instruments and microelectronics. In addition, the 
department offers many opportunities for 'co-op' and internship educational 
programs, which combine academic coursework with valuable on-the-job ex- 
periences. 

Students in the Visual Design curriculum learn to graphically communicate 
information, concepts and feelings through various media, especially print. 
Classes in graphic design history, typography, photography, illustration, print- 
ing processes and materials are synthesized with theory and methodology in the 
studio. 

The graduate curriculum prepares students to apply their creativity and 
technical expertise in either professional or non-applied academic research. 
Professional situations include the study of signs and symbols, posters, book and 
magazine design, packaging, exhibits, advertising and computer graphics. The 
academic orientation of study involves investigations of communication theory, 
problem-solving methodologies, form-generating strategies, visual perception 
and design evaluation. 

Textile design is the creation and development, by hand or machine, of fiber 
and fiber objects. While fabric yardage immediately comes to mind, textile 
designers also create clothing and accessories, home furnishings, wall hangings 
and other textiles for specific architectural or environmental purposes. 

In all these areas, the textile designer must combine creative ability and 
technical skills to conceive a product that is aesthetically pleasing, functionally 
sound and appropriate for production. This requires a thorough understanding 
of production processes, including product research, development and design; 
basic management principles and structures; marketing, manufacturing and 
merchandising. Students pursue study in specific areas of textile design, includ- 
ing printing, weaving, knitting, design and production processes. Whether the 
interest is in industrial mass production or individual craftsmanship in tradi- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 277 

tional methods of fabric construction, the same emphasis is placed on high 
quality design and how textiles shape, alter and enhance the human environ- 
ment. 

In the graduate program, students earn the professional Master of Product 
Design, with a Textile Design concentration. 

The student's program of selected course work and terminal project are under 
the direction of his/her graduate advisory committee. The terminal project shall 
constitute the final test of the candidate's mastery of his/her design studies. The 
project shall be developed in the design studio or special projects framework in 
the final year and shall consist of an in-depth investigation of an approved 
problem, which relates product design studies to the student's minor field. All 
students with a five-year undergraduate degree, equivalent or professional expe- 
rience shall be required to complete a minimum of 30 hours of course work of 
which approximately 70 percent will be in the major field and the remainder 
elected from various specialized knowledge areas. 

For students holding four-year undergraduate degrees in design, the program 
requires a minimum of 48 credit hours of course offerings in the normal two-year 
master's work. 

Applications for this program may come from the following sources: graduates 
of approved schools of product design, graduates of approved programs of indus- 
trial design, graduates of approved schools of graphic design, graduates of 
accredited schools of architecture or landscape architecture, graduates of 
approved schools of art and design, graduates of accredited schools of engineer- 
ing and, under special circumstances, students with degrees in fields other than 
design. In those latter instances an advisory committee will evaluate the appli- 
cant's preparation with regard to design capabilities and professional compe- 
tence. In addition, course offerings are available to any graduate student who can 
demonstrate reasonable competence or equivalent qualifications for prerequi- 
sites in the requested courses. All applicants in addition to meeting the qualifica- 
tions of the Graduate School must meet the special requirements of the Product 
Design program with regard to design capabilities and professional competence. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PD 400 Product Design Studio. Preq.: DF 102 or written approval ofdepL head. 6(0-9) 
F,S. 

PD (TX) 471 Textile Design Studio. Preqs.: A grade of C or better in PD (TMT) 272, 371 
and 372. 6(0-9) F,S. 

VD 400 Visual Design Studio. Preq.: DF 102 or vrritten approval ofdept head and dean; 
Coreq.: DN Jt56, DN 2U2. 6(0-9) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PD 510 Product Design Project Preparation. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. A 
seminar course designed to assist students in preparing the groundwork for the final 
project to be conducted in the design studio. 

PD 51 1 Product Design Materials and Processes L Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. An 
analysis of paper, wood, metal and manufacturing processes utilized in the production of 
mass-produced products. Advanced studies in mass production processes and their influ- 



278 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ence on design and development of products. Emphasis placed on material search and 
process selection in relation to product safety, cost, function, human factors, form, finishes 
and joining methods. 

PD 512 Product Design Materials and Processes II. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. An 
analysis of plastics and rubber and the related manufacturing processes utilized in the 
production of mass-produced products. Advanced studies in mass production processes and 
their influence on design and development of products. Emphasis placed on material 
search and process selection in relation to cost, product safety, function, human factors, 
form, finishes and joining methods. 

PD 541. 542 Advanced Visual Design I, II. Preqs.: ARC UOO. LAR WO, PD UOO or VD 

UOO; waiver of preq. is at the discretion of the instructor. 6(3-9) F,S. Application of previous 
studies in design and visual communications to a w^ide variety of visual problems presented 
by our physical environment. 

PD 591 Special Seminar in Product Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Seminars 
on subjects of current interest in product design w^hich are presented by persons not part of 
the regular faculty. 

PD 592 Special Topics in Product Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-3 F,S. Topics of 
current interest to the program/option offered by faculty in the School. Subjects offered 
under this number normally used to test and develop new courses. 

PD 595 Independent Study in Product Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. Max. 6. 
F,S,Sum. Special problems in various aspects of product design developed under the 
direction of a faculty member on a tutorial basis. 

VD 510 Visual Design Project Preparation. Preq.: BEDVD degree or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
S. A seminar course designed to assist students in preparing the foundation for the final 
project to be conducted in the design studio. 

VD 5 1 7 Advanced Typographic Systems. Preqs.: DN 21 7 and DN 31 7. 3(2-2) F. Syste- 
matic approaches to structuring typographic form according to information hierarchies, 
user needs and visual expression. Application to the organization of tables, charts, books, 
magazines, corporate identities and signage. 

VD 518 Advanced Typographic Expression. Preqs.: DN 217 and DN 317 or equivalent. 
3(2-2) S. This course focuses on experimentation in typography for the purpose of subjective 
expression. Analysis of historical precedent, contemporary usage and the semiotics of 
shaped writing provide a basis for the advanced student to study and use typography as 
image, metaphor and symbol. 

VD 519 Non-camera Photographies. Preqs.: VD 218, VD 256, VD UOO. 3(2-2) S. Image- 
making using photographic materials but not the camera. Exercises and projects emphas- 
ize the integration of these images with typography and graphic elements. Processes 
include diazo, photograms and xerography. Application to practical graphic design 
problems. 

VD 591 Special Seminar in Visual Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F, S. Seminar on 
subjects of current interest in graphic design, presented by persons not part of the regular 
faculty. 

VD 592 Special Topics in Visual Design. Preq. Grad. standing. 2-3 F, S. Topics of 
current interest to the program/option offered by faculty in the School. Subjects offered 
under this number normally used to test and develop new courses. 

VD 595 Independent Study in Visual Design. l-3F,S,Sum. Special problems in various 
aspects of graphic design developed under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial 
basis. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 279 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PD 600 Advanced Product Design (Series). Preq.: Portfolio review. 6(0-12) F,S. 
Advanced studies in product design. Special emphasis is given to problem identification, 
program formulation and application of advanced design methods. All problems will be of 
an individual nature leading to a synthesis of previous design experience. 

PD 632 Advanced Concepts in Product Engineering. Preqs.: PD 600, grad. standing. 
3(3-0) F,S. Group investigation of advanced concepts in product design with emphasis on 
engineering. Engineering principles play an important role in the design of useful pro- 
ducts. The scope of this course includes mass movement of persons as well as the designs of 
consumer products. The field of transportation and consumer products are fast-changing to 
satisfy the needs of present and future generations. The product designer to be made aware 
of these needs by special investigations into future technologies and material developments. 

PD 670 Advanced Product Design-Textiles (Series). Preq.: Portfolio review. 6(0-12) 
F,S,Sum. Advanced studies in textile styling. Special emphasis given to problem identifi- 
cation, program formulation and application of advanced design methods. All problems of 
an individual nature. 

PD 691 Special Topics in Product Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 S. An investiga- 
tion of special topics in product design of a particular interest to advanced students under 
the direction of the chair of the graduate committee on a tutorial basis. Credit and content 
vary with each student. 

PD 698 Final Project Studio in Product Design. Preq.: 18 hours of PD 600. 6(0-12). 
Final project for graduate students superyised by members of their graduate advisory 
committees. 

VD 600 Advanced Visual Design (Series). Preq.: Portfolio review. 6(0-12) F,S,Sum. 
Advanced studies in graphic design. Special emphasis given to problem identification, 
problem formulation and application of advanced design methods. All problems of an 
individual nature leading to a synthesis of previous design experiences. 

VD 691 Special Topics in Visual Design. Preq.: Permission of grad. advisor. 1-6 
F,S,Suni. An investigation of special topics in graphic design of a particular interest to 
advanced students under the direction of the chair of the graduate committee on a tutorial 
basis; credit and content vary with each student. 

VD 698 Final Project Studio in Visual Design. Preq.: 18 hrs. of VD 600. 6(0-12) F,S. 
Final project for graduate students supervised by members of their graduate advisory 
committees. 

Psychology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. W. Thayer, Head 

Professors: J . W. Cunningham, D. W. Drewes, T. E. LeVere, S. E. Newman, B. W. 
Westbrook; Adjunct Professor-: J. L. Howard; Professors Emeriti: K. L. Bark- 
ley, H. M. Corter, J. C.Johnson, H. G. MiUer; Associate Professors: J . L. Cole, D. 
0. Gray, T. M. Hess, P. E. Horan, J. W. Kalat, K. W. Klein, J. E. R. Luginbuhl, 
D. H. Mershon, S. B. Pond HI, F.J. Smith, S. S. Snyder, N. W. Walker; Adjunct 
Associate Professor: B. F. Corder; Associate Professors Emeriti: M. H. Pitts, R. 
F. Rawls; Assistant Professors: L. E. Baker-Ward, M. Y. Bingham, S. A. 



280 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Converse, W. P. Erchul, R. W. Nacoste; Visiting Assistant Professor: B. A. 
Braddy; Adjunct Assistant Professors: B. H. Beith, A. D. Hall, C. L. Kronberg 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: C. D. Korte, R. G. Pearson, J. L. Wasik 

The Department of Psychology offers seven courses of study leading to the 
Doctor of Philosophy degree. Specialization is available in applied developmen- 
tal psychology, experimental psychology, ergonomics, industrial-organizational 
and vocational psychology, school psychology, social psychology and human 
resource development. The Master of Science degree is awarded as part of a 
student's work toward the doctorate at NCSU. 

A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit is required for the master's 
degree. Though no minimum number of additional hours is required for the 
doctoral degree, the student may expect to take 30 or more additional semester 
hours of graduate credit. The actual graduate program for each student is 
tailored to the needs, interests and accomplishments of the individual. Admission 
requirements for the beginning graduate student in psychology are satisfactory 
grades in all undergraduate work and at least a "B" average in undergraduate 
psychology courses and in the undergraduate major, satisfactory scores on the 
Graduate Record Examination including the Advanced Test in psychology and 
three satisfactory letters of recommendation in regard to quality of work and 
character. The Miller Analogies Test is recommended as well. It is possible to 
enter the program without undergraduate coursework in psychology but some 
preparation in experimental psychology, statistics and mathematics is desirable. 

Admission requirements for students already possessing the master's degree 
who wish to obtain the doctorate in psychology are a minimum of a "B" average in 
their graduate work and a substantial background in psychology or related 
fields, satisfactory grades in undergraduate studies, satisfactory scores on the 
Graduate Record Examination including the Advanced Test in psychology (if the 
applicant's master's degree is in a field other than psychology, the Advanced Test 
score in that field should also be submitted) and three satisfactory letters of 
recommendation in regard to quality of work and character. The Miller Analo- 
gies Test is also recommended. 

Match of applicants' proposed research interests with those of current faculty 
is an important criterion for admission. 

A limited number of research and teaching assistantships and fellowships are 
available to qualified graduate students. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development. Preq.: PSY 200 or PSY SOIt. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. 

PSY 491 Special Topics in Psychologry. Preq.: PSY 200. 3(3-0) F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 281 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PSY 500 Visual Perception. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(2-2) F. Detailed considera- 
tion of anatomy and physiology of the visual system (both peripheral and central compo- 
nents). Modern quantitative approaches to psychophysical problems of detection, discrimi- 
nation, scaling. Examination of chief determinants of visual perception, including both 
stimulus variables and such organismic variables as learning, motivation and attention. 
Discussion of perceptual theory and processes emphasizes several topics in two- and three- 
dimensional spatial perception. Mershon 

PSY 501 Introduction to Graduate Study in Psychology. Preq.: Grad. standing in 
PSY. 1(1-0) F. Orientation to graduate study in psychology. Library and computer systems. 
Faculty research and teaching interests. Special research facilities and populations. 
Standards for research with human and inf rahuman subjects. Ethical principles of Ameri- 
can Psychological Association. Generic and specialty guidelines for providers of psycholog- 
ical services. North Carolina Licensing Law and supporting rules. Psychology as science, 
discipline and profession. Newman 

PSY 502 Physiological Psychology. Preq.: Twelve hrs. of PSY including PSY 200, 300, 
310. 3(3-0) F. First of two-semester sequence concerned with the physiological foundations 
of behavior. The emphasis in this first course is basic vertebrate neuroanatomy and 
neurophysiology. LeVere 

PSY 504 Advanced Educational Psychology. Preg..- Six Ars. of PSY. 3(3-0) F. kcrxixczX 
appraisal of current psychological findings that are relevant to educational practice and 
theory. Baker-Ward 

PSY 505 History and Systems of Psychology. Preqs.: PSY 200, 300, 310, 320 or CI or 
grad. status. 3(3-0) S. The aim of this course is to acquaint students with the history of 
psychology and psychological systems and to give students some practice in taking differ- 
ent approaches to a particular problem area. Converse 

PSY 510 Learning and Motivation. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) S. A 
systematic analysis of some of the major classes of variables determining behavioral 
change. Learning variables analyzed within their primary experimental setting, and 
emphasis upon the diversity of the functions governing behavior change rather than upon 
the development of some comprehensive theory. Both learning and motivational variables 
examined as they contribute to changes in performance within the experimental setting. 

Cole 

PSY 511 Advanced Social Psychology. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(3-0) F. A 
survey of theory and research in social psychology through reading and discussion of 
primary source materials. In addition, the course deals with issues of methodology, ethical 
questions in social psychological research and application of research findings to the world 
at large. Luginbuhl 

PSY 512 Action Research in Psychology. Preq.: ST 507 or equivalent; Coreq.:ST508or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Action research models in psychology and their relationships to 
research methods; Research in field settings and implications for ethics and social respon- 
sibility, internal and external validity, experimenter and volunteer effects and problems of 
measurement. Gray 

PSY 513 Psychology and Law. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Interaction 
between psychology and law, including pretrial surveys, jury selection, eyewitness identifi- 
cation, jury decision making, competence to stand trial, insanity, expert testimony, sexual 
assault and the death penalty. Luginbuhl 



282 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PSY 514 Foundations of Behavioral Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing, ST 507 and 
PSY 5S5 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A course in scientific behavioral research, basically 
psychological in nature, designed to help students understand the fundamental nature of 
the scientific approach to problem solution. Technical and methodological problems consi- 
dered. The course emphasizes the controlled and objective study of the relations among 
phenomena, the scientific approach and the relations between a research problem and the 
design and methodology of its solution. Westbrook 

PSY 520 Cognitive Processes. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 3(2-2) F. This course 
emphasizes the results from research on a number of complex processes {e.g.. remember- 
ing, concept learning, problem solving, acquisition and use of language) and the theories 
that have been proposed to explain these results. Newman 

PSY 530 Advanced Abnormal Psychology. Preqs.: PSY 200, 370. 3(3-0) S. The causes, 
symptomatic behavior and treatment of the major personality disturbances. Emphasis on 
theory, experimental psychopathology and preventive measures. Graduate Staff 

PSY 533 Biologrical Factors in Abnormal Behavior. Preqs.: Sixhrs. of PSY and six hrs. 
of biology. 3(3-0) Sum. Alt. yrs. Biological influences and predispositions in abnormal 
human behavior, including brain damage and disconnection syndromes, psychosomatic 
illnesses, anxiety and neurosis, manic-depressive disorder, schizophrenia and disorders of 
memory, eating, movement, sexual behavior and others. Assumes only a moderate biology 
background. Kalat 

PSY 535 Tests and Measurements. Preq.: Six hrs. of PSY. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the 
principles of psychological testing including norms and units of measurement, elementary 
statistical concepts, reliability and validity. In addition, some attention devoted to the 
major types of available tests such as general intellectual development, tests of separate 
abilities, achievement tests, measures of personality and interest inventories. Westbrook 

PSY (IE) 540 Human Factors in Systems Design. Preq.: IE i52 or PSY 340; Coreq.:ST 
507 or 515. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to problems of the systems development cycle, including 
human-machine function allocation, military specifications, display-control compatibility, 
the personnel sub-system concept and maintainability design. Detailed treatment given to 
people as information processing mechanisms. Pearson 

PSY 543 Ergonomic Performance Assessment. Preqs.: PSY 200, ST 507 and 508 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Fundamentals of ergonomic performance measurement used 
to assess the effects of environment and system design on human performance. Treatment 
of topics such as workload measurement, measurement of complex performance, simulator 
studies, measurement of change, task taxonomies, criterion task sets and statistical 
methods of task analysis. Problems of laboratory and field research, measurement of 
change and generalizability of findings. Converse 

PSY (IE) 545 Human Performance. Preqs.: (had. standing; ST 507 or equivalent. S. 
Alt. yrs. Fundamentals of human perceptual and motor abilities basic to skilled operator 
performance. Theoretical models of man as an operator. The human as an information 
processing mechanism. Motor skills learning, performance decrement and information 
feedback. Channel capacity, stress, fatigue, arousal theory. Attention, time-sharing and 
workload. Sustained performance, vigilance, monitoring, search, inspection and tracking. 
Circadian rhythms; sleep loss; shiftwork. Pearson 

PSY 546 Human Information Processing. Preqs.: PSY 200, ST 507 and 508 or equiva- 
lent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Fundamentals of human information processing basic to skilled 
operator performance and the design of displays, controls and complex systems. Treatment 
of topics such as channel capacity, working memory, long-term memory, decision making, 
attention and process monitoring. Problems of display and control design and evaluation, 
evaluation of textual material, and human-computer interaction. Converse 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 283 

PSY 560 Personnel Selection Research. Preqs.: Six hrs. ofgrad. ST, PS Y 535. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. A survey of theoretical, methodological and research literature on personnel 
selection. Topics include organization, task and person analyses, validation strategies, 
utility and equal opportunity issues and selection strategies. Emphasis on research. 

Thayer 

PSY 561 Training Research. Preqs.: Six hrs. ofgrad. PSY and six hrs. ofgrad. ST. 3(3-0) 
F. Alt. yrs. A survey of conceptual and research literature on training. Topics include needs 
assessments, learning, transfer, maintenance, criterial and evaluation issues, as well as a 
review of research on specific training techniques. Emphasis on research methods and 
findings, not skill development in specific training techniques. Thayer 

PSY 565 Organizational Psychology. Preq.: Nine hrs. of PSY. 3(3-0) F. A study of the 
application of behavioral science, particularly psychology and social psychology, to organi- 
zational and management problems. Pond 

PSY 566 Organization Development and Change. Preq.: PSY 565. 3(3-0) S. A survey of 
theory and research in organization development. Attention directed to: (1) methods of 
diagnosing the need for organizational change, (2) techniques currently used to implement 
and evaluate organizational change, (3) professional ethics and other issues dealing with 
the client-consultant relationship. Emphasis on developmental approaches originating 
from psychology and allied fields. Pond 

PSY 570 Theories of Personality. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. A review of theories of 
personality, with emphasis on research, application in psychotherapy and measurement, 
principles involved in similarities and differences among them and development of a 
personal model. Horan 

PSY 571 Individual Intelligence Measurement. Preq.: PSY 535 and consent of school 
psychology coordinator. 3(3-0) S. A practicum in individual intelligence testing with 
emphasis on the Wechsler Bellevue, Stanford-Binet, report writing and case studies. 

Walker 

PSY 572 Psychological Survey Operations. Preq.: ST 507 or equivalent; Coreq.: ST .508 
or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Emphasis on application of survey operational methods to problems 
of interest to psychologists in governmental, institutional and industrial settings. Course 
designed to provide competency in questionnaire construction, data collection, design and 
analysis procedures and report writing. The class will design, conduct and analyze a survey 
on topic of their own selection in the area of psychology. Klein 

PSY 573 Theories of Intelligence. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Critical 
analysis of the psychological construct of intelligence. Traditional theories, as well as 
cognitive developmental, information-processing, comparative psychology, artificial intel- 
ligence, cross-cultural and epistemological approaches to intelligence explored. Horan 

PSY 576 Advanced Developmental Psychology. Preq.: Nine hrs. of PSY, including 
PSY 376, PSYJt75 or PSY 1^76. 3(3-0) F. A survey of the role of growth and development in 
human behavior, particularly during the child and adolescent periods. This course pays 
particular attention to basic principles and theories in the area of developmental 
psychology. Snyder 

PSY 577 Adolescent Development. Preq.: 6 hours in PSY or CI. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Alt. yrs. 
Current theories and research on development during adolescence. Topics include: physical 
growth, cognitive changes, relationships with peers, parents and teachers, quest for iden- 
tity and independence, morality and sexuality. Snyder 

PSY 579 Adult Developmentand Aging. Pre(7..PS757(?org^n'a/ew^. 3(3-0)S.Alt. yrs. 
Critical examination of theory and research associated with the study of normal adult 
development and aging. Topics include: methodological issues; cognitive and intellectual 



284 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

development; changes in learning and memory; personality and emotional development; 
socialization processes; psychophysiological and biological factors. Hess 

PSY 580 Psychological Consultation. Preq.: Nine hrs. grad. PSY or ED. 3(2-2) S. 
Introduction to psychological consultation with emphasis on school setting. Presentation of 
various consultation models and theoretical bases. Development of skills in practice of 
consultation. Erchul 

PSY 585 Advanced Problems in Psychology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Offers 
opportunities to explore various areas of psychology. Sections: Section D, applied develop- 
mental psychology; Section X, experimental psychology; Section I, industrial-organi- 
zational and vocational psychology; Section S, social psychology. Graduate Staff 

PSY 591 Special Topics in Psychology. Preq.: 6 hrs. of PSY; Coreq.: 3 hrs. of ST. 1-3 F,S. 
Course provides opportunity for exploration in depth of advanced areas and topics of 
current interest. Graduate Staff 

PSY (IE) 593 Area Seminar in Ergonomics. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 
1(0-2), Max. 3. F. Introduction to ergonomics as an area of study; historical aspects; 
contemporary issues; ethical questions; overview^ of campus research, facilities and courses 
in the area; consideration of information sources, financial support for research proposals 
and employment opportunities. Graduate Staff 

PSY 594 Area Seminar in Human Resources Development. Preq.: CI. 1-3, Max. 6. 
F,S. The following topics dealt with: (1) human resources development as an area of 
inquiry, (2) methods of inquiry, (3) contemporary issues, (4) ethical questions, (5) relation- 
ship to other areas within psychology. Drewes 

PSY 595 Area Seminar in School Psycholog:y. Preq.: Grad. standing or PBS status. 1-3, 
Max. 6. F,S. The following topics dealt with: (1) the development of school psychology as a 
professional area, (2) methods of inquiry, (3) scientific and theoretical bases, (4) contempor- 
ary issues, (5) ethical questions, (6) relationship to other areas within psychology. 

Graduate Staff 

PSY 599 Research Problems in Psychology. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. 
Research project for graduate students supervised by members of the graduate faculty. 
Research to be elected on basis of interest of student and not to be part of thesis or 
dissertation research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PSY 600 Advanced Problems in Perception. Preq.: PSY 500. 3(2-2) S. Alt. yrs. An 
exploration of advanced topics in the field of perception. Specific coverage varies from year 
to year but may include examination of sensory/ perceptual processes in audition and other 
non-visual systems, attentional and organizational factors in perception, information pro- 
cessing approaches to perception, theories of perception and/or perceptual/motor skills. 

Mershon 

PSY 602 Physiological Psychology. Preq.: PSY 502 and/or CI. 3(3-0) S. PSY 602, the 
sequel to PSY 502, concentrates on relating the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology studied 
in PSY 502 to overt observable behaviors such as sleep-waking, motivation-emotion and 
reflexive and learned behaviors. LeVere 

PSY 61 1 Social Psychology: Small Groups Research. Preq.: PSY 511. 3(3-0) S. Surveys 
the literature and research pertaining to social psychological processes in and between 
groups. Course content includes basic principles of group formation, role differentiation, 
communication, influence, norms, social exchange, equity, cooperation/conflict, decision 
making and pro-social behavior. Environmental factors affecting group behavior also 
considered. In conjunction with each substantive topic, the suitable methodologies for 
research considered. Smith 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 285 

PSY 612 Attitudes. Preq.: Six hrs. grad. PSY or CI. 3(3-0) F. Theory and research in 
attitude formation and change; analysis of various persuasion paradigms employed in mass 
communication and group influence processes; study of individual attitudinal structures, 
resistance to persuasion, behavior as a precursor to attitude change; attitude behavior 
discrepancy, attitude measurement techniques and methodological considerations. Klein 

PSY 613 Attribution. Preq.: PSY 511. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. The determinants and conse- 
quences of assigning causes for the behavior of others and ourselves. Topics include attribu- 
tional models, emotional states, success and failure, responsibility assignments, self- 
handicapping, self-fulfilling prophecy, motivational biases and applications to therapy. 

Luginbuhl 

PSY 614 Stress and Coping. Preq.: Two grad. PSY courses. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Discussion 
of current research findings and theories in area of psychosocial stress. Topics include: 
biology of the stress response, methodology, physical, behavioral and psychological reac- 
tions to stress, and relationships between personality and social support to the development 
of stress-related disorders. Klein 

PSY 620 Advanced Problems in Cognition. Preq.: PSY 520 or CI. 3(3-0) S. This 
seminar provides the opportunity for exploring in depth problems and issues in memory, 
concept learning, problem solving, psycholinguistics and other areas in cognition. 

Newman 

PSY 635 PsychologicalMeasurement. Pregs.; ST 507, 511 or equivalent, 12hrs. of PSY. 
3(3-0) F. Theory of psychological measurement. Statistical problems and techniques in test 
construction. Cunningham 

PSY(IE)640 SkiWedOpersiiorPerformaince.Preqs.: PSY 5J^5, ST 507 or ST 5 15. 3(3-0) 
F. Alt. yrs. Theories of the human operator considered with regard to the classical problems 
of monitoring, vigilance and tracking. Factors such as biological rhythm, sleep loss, sensory 
restriction, environmental stress and timesharing considered as they interact with and 
determine overall systems efficiency. Pearson 

PSY 650 Vocational Psychology. Preqs.: ST 507, PSY 5U, 635 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 
Alt. yrs. The study of the individual's vocational behavior and development through the 
years of choice and adjustment. An up-to-date review and synthesis of research and theory 
in the field of vocational psychology. Empirical studies and theoretical statements in the 
field appraised and evaluated to determine what behavioral laws apply to vocational 
phenomena. Westbrook 

PSY 665 Work Motivation. Preq.: PSY 565. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Theory and research in 
work motivation. An in-depth examination of motivation theory as it pertains to the study of 
individual behavior in work settings. Pond 

PSY 671 Psycholog:y of Families and Parenting. Preq.: Nine hrs. grad. PSY or ED. 
3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Special topics in the area, including family influences on cognitive 
development, effects of parental divorce on children, single-parenting, step-families, child 
abuse and ethnic/cultural differences in family functioning. A critical examination of 
traditional and contemporary parenting approaches and an introduction to family therapy. 

Erchul 

PSY 672 Personality Measurement. Preqs.: PSY 570, 571. 3(2-3) S. Theory and practi- 
cum in individual personality testing of children and adults with emphasis on projective 
techniques, other personality measures, report writing and case studies. Walker 

PSY 674 Psychological Intervention I. Preqs.: PSY 672, 530 and CI. 3(2-2) F. This 
course designed to examine theories, research, techniques, ethics and professional respon- 
sibilities related to approaches to psychological intervention. Types of psychological inter- 
vention to be studied include behavior modification, milieu approaches, crisis intervention 
techniques and group process methods, in addition to more intensive relationship 



286 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

approaches. A close integration of experiences, content and supervision emphasized in a 
variety of professional settings with a wide range of personal problems and age groups. 

Graduate Staff 

PSY 675 Psychological Intervention II. Preq.: PSY67If. 3(2-2) S. The primary purpose 
of this course is to provide students opportunities to acquire information, conceptual 
frameworks, interpersonal skills and a sense of ethical responsibility, all basic to their 
further development as practicing psychologists. A major effort in the course made to help 
the student increase his/her interpersonal skills as a means of promoting the psychological 
growth and effectiveness of others. Graduate Staff 

PSY 676 Cognitive Development. Preq.: PSY 576. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Examination of 
research and theory in cognitive development. The primary focus on childhood, but impli- 
cations for the entire life span addressed. Application of cognitive developmental principles 
in creating interventions and educational programs also discussed. Hess 

PSY 677 Social Development. Preq.: PSY 576. 3(3-0) Alt. yrs. Survey of current theory 
and research on the development of social behavior systems, including attachment, aggres- 
sion, gender-role behavior, prosocial behavior. Attention to the role of social class, race and 
culture, and to contemporary phenomena such as day care, single-parent and dual-career 
families, child abuse. Graduate Staff 

PSY 680 Systems Theory and Applications in Human Resource Development. Preq.: 
PSY 59 A or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. An introduction to the systems approach and general 
systems theory. (1) Concepts and terminology of general systems theory, (2) techniques 
currently used to access system requirements and (3) methods of analyzing system perfor- 
mance. Emphasis on application of systems techniques to the design and implementation of 
human resource development programs. Drewes 

PSY 681 Quasi-experimental Evaluation Design. Preq.: ST 507 or equivalent. 3(3-0)S. 
An introduction to quasi-experimental design as applied to HRD program evaluation: (1) 
Methods of assessing informational needs, (2) recognition of internal and external validity 
threats, (3) design of quasi-experiments to minimize threats and (4) use of results by 
program decision makers. Drewes 

PSY 691 Special Topics in Psychology. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 1-3 F,S. Course 
provides opportunity for exploration in depth of advanced topical areas which, because of 
their degree of specialization, not generally involved in other courses; for example, multi- 
variate methodology in psychology, computer simulation, mathematical model building. 
Some new 600-level courses will first be offered under this title during the developmental 
phase and as such may involve lectures and/or laboratories. Graduate Staff 

PSY 693 Psychological Clinic Practicum. Preqs.: Twelve hrs. in grad. PSY, which must 
include clinical skill courses PSY 571 and PSY 672 and/or CI. Max. 12 F,S. Clinical 
participation in interviewing, counseling, psychotherapy and administration of psycholog- 
ical tests. Practicum to be concerned with adults and children. Erchul, Horan, Walker 

PSY 697 Advanced Seminar in Research Design. Preqs.: Nine hrs. of statistical 
methods and research or CI, advanced grad. status. 3(3-0) F. A seminar-type course with 
topics selected each semester in accordance with the interests and needs of the students. 
Attention given to the research strategies that underlie educational and psychological 
research, to the development of theoretical constructs, to a critical review of research 
related to problems in which the students interested, and to a systematic analysis and 
critique of research problems in which the students engaged. Graduate Staff 

PSY 698 Internship in Psychology. Preqs.: Master's degree in PSY and approval of 
advisory committee. 1-12 F,S. Supervised work experience in an appropriate setting with 
professional supervision in the field from a doctoral level psychologist with credentials 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 287 

and/or experience in the appropriate specialty in psychology. Experience consists of full 
time for one semester or half time for an academic year or equivalent time. 

Erchul, Horan, Walker 

PSY 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits 
arranged. F,S. Individual research on a thesis or dissertation problem; a maximum of six 
credits allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward the Ph.D. degree. 

Graduate Staff 



Recreation Resources Administration 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. S. Rea, Head 

Associate Professor B. E. Wilson, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: H. A. Devine, A. Lumpkin, C. D. Siderelis, R. E. Sternloff, M. R. 
Warren; Professors Emeriti: T. L Hines, W. E. Smith; Associate Professors: S. 
L. Kirsch, R. R. Perdue; Adjunct Associate Professor: H. K. Cordell; Associate 
Professors Emeriti: G. A. Hammon, L. L. Miller; Assistant Professor: C. S. Love 

The Department of Recreation Resources Administration offers programs of 
study leading to the Master of Science and Master of Recreation Resources 
Administration degrees. The programs are based on an interdisciplinary 
approach and are designed to meet the problems and opportunities posed by 
changing social forces which affect the recreation, park and leisure professions. 
Students pursuing these degrees have an opportunity to develop an understand- 
ing of the relationship between recreation and disciplines such as forestry, wild- 
life management, horticulture, landscape design, conservation, economics and 
business, politics, sociology and anthropology. 

The Master of Science degree is designed for students who are interested in the 
advanced applications of research to the management and operations of recrea- 
tion and park agencies. Students are required to complete a minimum of 30 hours 
of graduate work. The program consists of a major and minor field of study. The 
minor may be concentrated wholly in a different discipline or may consist of 
courses selected from the offerings of two departments. 

Each candidate for the Master of Science degree is required to complete a 
thesis representing an original investigation as a part of the minimum require- 
ments for the degree. 

The Master of Recreation Resources Administration degree is designed for 
students who are interested in the applications of advanced management and 
organization principles in the operation of recreation, park and leisure service 
agencies. Requirements for the Master of Recreation Resources Administration 
degree include a minimum of 36 hours of course work. In lieu of a thesis the 
student will be required to complete additional departmental course work and an 
independent master's project. 



288 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

RRA 420 Resort Management and Operations. Preq.: RRA 152. 3(3-0) S. 

RRA 438 Recreation for Special Populations. Preq.: RRA 358. 3(3-0) F. 

RRA 442 Recreation and Park Interpretive Services. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(2-3) F,S. 

RRA 443 Applied Recreation and Park Interpretive Services. Preqs.: RRA 4Jf2, jr. 
standing. 3(1-6) S. 

RRA 451 Principles of Recreation Planning and Facilities Development. Preq.: RRA 
358. 3(2-3) F,S. 

RRA 453 Administrative Policies and Procedures. Preq.: RRA 359. 3(3-0) F. 

RRA 454 Recreation and Park Finance. Preqs.: Six hours of RRA courses and sr. 
standing. 3(3-0) S. 

RRA 480 Recreation Analysis and Evaluation. Preqs.: RRA 359, ST 311. 3(2-2) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

RRA 500 Theories of Leisure and Recreation. 3(3-0) F. Analysis of leisure and recrea- 
tion and a study of their origin and development as revealed by man's behavioral patterns. 
Interpretation of the influence and social significance of leisure and recreation concepts on 
contemporary American culture and their implications on future recreation thought and 
action. Warren 

RRA 501 Research Methods in Recreation. Preqs.: ST 311. 3(3-0) F. Examination and 
understanding of advanced scientific investigative methods in their application toward 
explaining recreation and leisure behavioral phenomena and for the resolution of recrea- 
tion management problems. Perdue 

RRA (EB) 503 Economics of Recreation. Preq.: EB 301 or Wl. 3(3-0) F. The principal 
emphasis on identity and importance of economic information for planning. The market 
mechanism and government examined as they affect and interact to affect allocation of 
resources to recreation, distribution of recreation services and behavior of recreationists. 
Other topics include demand analysis, economics of planning, cost/benefit analysis, secon- 
dary economic impacts, public decision making, externalities, public finance and supply 
considerations in urban and rural recreation situations. Devine 

RRA 504 Recreation and Park Data Systems. Preqs.: CSC 200, ST 311. 3(3-0) S. This 
course includes the analysis of such topics as the identification of maintenance, operation 
and service delivery work areas in recreation and park agencies for system applications; 
development of reporting structures; recreation and maintenance activity scheduling; 
system monitoring; system implementation evaluation. Siderelis 

RRA 505 Quantitative Techniques for Recreation and Natural Resource Manage- 
ment. Preqs.: CSC 200, ST 31 1. 3(3-0) S. A review of the application of specific management 
science techniques to recreation and natural resource management. Gravity, optimization, 
sinriulation and other modeling procedures discussed through a case study approach. The 
primary emphasis of the course on exposure to techniques and problem formulation rather 
than development of theoretical bases or computational methodologies. Devine 

RRA 510 Theories of Sport and Fitness Program Management. Preq.: RRA 358. 
3(3-0) F. The development of a theoretical basis for sport and physical fitness program 
management. The sociological, psychological, political and economic considerations of 
sport and fitness studied. Values and motivation of sport and fitness stressed. Love 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 289 

RRA 511 Foundations for Sport, Exercise and Fitness Program Management. 

Preq.: RRA 358. 3(3-0) Evei~y third sem. The development of a scientific basis for sport, 
exercise and fitness program development. Characteristics of human growth, development 
and aging studied as they relate to participation in physical activity. Emphasis on physical 
fitness evaluation and program development. Rea 

RRA 512 Recreational Sports Management. Preq.: RRA 358. 3(3-0) Every third sem. 
An overview and analysis of key managerial concerns of the sports enterprise. Problems 
and issues unique to the sports-oriented service or business stressed. Emphasis on recrea- 
tional sports settings. Graduate Staff 

RRA 520 Concepts of Travel and Tourism. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Theory and 
research in travel and tourism, including conceptual foundations, research problems and 
methods and the application of research results to strategic tourism development and 
marketing. Perdue 

RRA (LAR) 562 Computer Cartography. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) S. An 
introduction to the application of computers and associated analytic technology to problems 
in natural resource planning and management. The course emphasizes the use of auto- 
mated mapping and display procedures in land use decision making and involves the 
student in first-hand experiences with a number of different procedures and computer 
hardware configurations. Not a general course in computer graphics and deals exclusively 
with natural resource management applications. Devine 

RRA 580 Current Issues in Recreation Resources. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 1-3 S. 
An examination of current issues in recreation resources. Course content varies as chang- 
ing conditions require new approaches to emerging problems. Graduate Staff 

RRA 591 Recreation Resources Problems. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or grad. statics. 
1-U F,S. Assigned or selected problems in the field of recreation administration, planning, 
supervision, maintenance, operations, financing or program. Special research problems 
selected on basis of interest of students and supervised by members of the graduate faculty. 

Graduate Staff 

RRA 595 Special Topics in Recreation Resources. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 1-3 F,S. 
Special topics in various aspects of recreation resources developed under direction of a 
graduate faculty member on a tutorial basis. Subjects offered under this course listing also 
used to test and develop new courses. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

RRA 675 Field Studies in Recreation. Preq.: Minimum of nine hrs. of grad. credit. l-U 
F,S,Sum. Experience in applying analytical methods to administrative, managerial and 
planning problems in providing recreation and park opportunities. Completion of an 
evaluation project or analytical study for the practicum agency required. 

Graduate Staff 

RRA 690 Recreation Management Seminar I. Preqs.: RRA 500, 501. 2(0-U) F. 
Research and theories of (1) marketing, (2) case law and liability and (3) personnel practices 
as they relate to the management of recreation resources. Graduate Staff 

RRA 691 Recreation Management Seminar II. Preqs.: RRA 500, RRA 501. 2(0-U) S. 
Research and theories of (1) planning and development, (2) financing and (3) maintenance 
management of recreation resources. Graduate Staff 

RRA 692 Advanced Problems in Recreation. Preq.: Twelve hrs. of RRA courses. Cred- 
its Arranged. F,S. Directed research in a specialized phase of recreation other than a thesis 
problem. Graduate Staff 



290 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

RRA 696 Seminar in Recreation Research. Preq. orcoreq.: RRA 501. 1(2-0) S. Research 
studies, scientific articles and progress reports on research effects presented and critically 
evaluated. Each student pursuing a graduate degree expected to take this offering twice for 
one hour of credit each time. Graduate Staff 

RRA 699 Research in Recreation. Preq.: Twelve hrs. of RRA courses. Credits Arranged. 
F,S. Original research preliminary to writing a master's thesis. Graduate Staff 

Sociolo^, Anthropology and Social Work 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. B. Otto, Head 

Associate Professor M. P. Atkinson, Associate Head, HASS Programs 

Professor W. B. Clifford II, Associate Head, ALS Programs 

Professor E. M. Suval, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: L. R. Delia Fave, V. A. Hiday, C. P. Marsh, R. L. Moxley, P. N. Reid, 
0. Uzzell, R. C. Wimberley; Professors Emeriti: L. A. Drabick, H. D. Rawls, M. 
E. Voland, J. N. Young; Associate Professors: R. C. Brisson, A. C. Davis, S. K. 
Garber, G. D. Hill, J. C. Leiter, S. C. Lilley, G. S. Nickerson, W. C. Peebles- 
Wilkins, M. D. Schulman, M. S. Thompson, R. J. Thomson, D. Tomaskovic- 
Devey, K. M. Troost, M. L. Walek, J. M. Wallace, E. M. Woodrum, M. T. 
Zingraff; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. G. Peck; Assistant Professors: R. S. 
Ellovich, T. J. Hoban, T. M. Hyman, B. J. Risman, M. L. Schwalbe; Assistant 
Professor Emeritus: C. C. Dawson 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: V. E. Hamilton, T. N. Hobgood Jr., R. D. Mustian, M. M. Sawhney 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers programs of study in 
sociology leading to the advanced degrees of Master of Sociology, Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The core program includes sociological theory, 
research methods and quantitative analysis. Major substantive areas of speciali- 
zation include agriculture and rural sociology, family, crime and deviance, social 
psychology, development, change and comparative sociology, social demography 
and ecology, community, inequality, and work, industry and organization. 

The Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are oriented toward 
the basic and applied science of sociology. Special attention is given to sociologi- 
cal skills for analyzing social factors and policies affecting informal groups, 
formal organizations, families, communities, regions, nations and international 
development. The Master of Sociology is designed for applied sociology careers in 
local, state and federal agencies; management and administration; human ser- 
vice delivery; program development and evaluation; and the teaching of sociology 
in secondary schools. The program focuses on the application of sociological 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 291 

theory, methods and research to social issues and problems. A practicum gives 
the student experience in an agency/organization. 

The department also offers a minor in cultural anthropology at the Master's 
level. Graduate courses are. designed to give a broad background in major con- 
cepts of cultural anthropology with emphasis on theory. These offerings may be 
supplemented with courses at the 400 level. 

Computer facilities are available to graduate students and faculty in the 
department as described under "Academic Computing Facilities." Graduate 
students on assistantships and fellowships are normally provided office facilities. 
Research opportunities reflect the wide range of interests of the graduate faculty 
and the imagination of the students themselves. The department also has a 
statewide extension focus in applied sociology. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ANT 416 Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Preq.: Six hrs. ANT. 3(3-0). 

ANT 420 Biological Bases for Human Social Behavior. Preq.: ANT 251, or BS 100 or 
105, GN 301, or equivalent. 3(3-0). 

ANT 498 Special Topics in Anthropology. Preq.: Six hrs. ofSOC/ANT. 1-6. 

SOC 400 Theories of Social Structure. Preq.: 3 credits ofSOC, 200 level. 3(3-0). 

SOC 401 Theories of Social Interaction. Preq.: 3 credits of SOC, 200 level. 3(3-0). 

SOC 402 Urban Sociology. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0). 

SOC 410 Sociology of Organizations. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0). 

SOC 414 Social Class. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0). 

SOC 418 Sociology of Education. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0). 

SOC 420 Sociology of Corrections. Preqs.: SOC 306 and PS 311. 3(3-0). 

SOC 425 Juvenile Delinquency. Preq.: SOC 202, SOC 301 desirable. 3(3-0). 

SOC 426 The Juvenile Justice System. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0). 

SOC 440 Social Change. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0). 

SOC 490 Senior Seminar in Sociology. Preqs.: Sr. standing and consent of department. 
3(3-0). 

SOC 498 Special Topics in Sociology. Preq.: Six hours SOC above 200 level. 1-6. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANT 508 Culture and Personality. Preq.: ANT 252 or 6 hrs. in Cultural Anthropology. 
3(3-0). The course focuses on the interplay between cultural norms and the enculturation 
process. From a cross-cultural perspective, it examines the process by which cultural 
norms transmitted and learned, as well as the effect of culture change on the individual. 
The historical development of the field as well as contemporary trends also discussed in 
both theoretical and applied contexts. Graduate Staff 



292 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ANT 51 1 Anthropolopcal Theory. Preqs.: ANT 252 or 6 hrs. in Cultural Anthropology. 
S(3-0). Approaches theory from both an historical and contemporary point of view. 
Emphasizes the Itey anthropological concept of culture and its significance for understand- 
ing man and his works. Graduate Staff 

ANT 512 Applied Anthropology. Preq.: ANT 252 or CI. 3(3-0). Includes a review of the 
historical development of applied anthropology and a study of anthropology as applied in 
government, industry, community development, education and medicine. The processes of 
cultural change analyzed in terms of the application of anthropological techniques to 
programs of developmental change. Graduate Staff 

ANT 591 Special Topics in Anthropology. Preq.: ANT 501 or equivalent. 1-6. This 
course designed to provide the opportunity for students to investigate in depth some 
particular topic in anthropology. Course content and mode of study vary, reflecting current 
student needs and interests. Topics determined by the faculty member(s) and student. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 501 Leadership. Preq.: SOC202 or equivalent. 3(3-0). Leadership in various fields of 
American life; analysis of factors associated with it; techniques of leadership. Stresses 
recreational, scientific and executive leadership procedures. Graduate Staff 

SOC 502 Society, Culture and Personality. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0). Studies 
human personality from its origins in primary groups through its development in secon- 
dary contacts and its ultimate integration with social norms. Explores comparative 
anthropological materials but places emphasis on the normal personality and individual 
adjustment to our society and culture. Dynamics of personality and character structure 
analyzed in terms of society's general culture patterns and social institutions. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 505 Medical Sociology. Preq.: Six credits in SOC or grad. standing or PBS status. 
3(3-0). Advanced sociological analysis of health care organizations and their systemic 
linkage to other community institutions. Measurement of health and illness and their social 
significance. Applications of sociological and social-psychological theories to practitioner- 
client relationships and interaction. Implications of alternative models of health care 
provision. Graduate Staff 

SOC 508 Social Organization. Preq.: SOC UOO or SOC 511. 3(3-0). Introduction to the 
study of social structure. Focus on inequality, work, organizations, the economy, the state. 
Classic writings and their impacts. Graduate Staff 

SOC 509 Population Problems. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0). Examines popula- 
tion growth, rates of change and distribution. Emphasizes functional roles of population, 
i.e., age, sex, race, residence, occupation, marital status and education. Population dynam- 
ics stressed: fertility, mortality and migration. Population policy analyzed in relation to 
national and international goals stressing a world view. Graduate Staff 

SOC 510 Industrial Sociology. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0). Industrial relations 
analyzed as group behavior with a complex and dynamic network of rights, obligations, 
sentiments and rules. This social system viewed as an interdependent part of total commun- 
ity life. The background and functioning of industrialism studied as social and cultural 
phenomena and its social problems analyzed. Graduate Staff 

SOC 511 Sociological Theory. Preqs.: Six hrs. SOC and grad. standing or PBS status. 
3(3-0). The interdependence of theory and method; the major theoretical and methodologi- 
cal systems. Examines selected cases of research in which theory and method classically 
combined. Graduate Staff 

SOC 512 Survey of Family Sociology. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0). Examines structural and 
demographic continuities and changes for American families in general and within major 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 293 

subgroups {e.g., race, ethnicity, social class). Historical and cross-cultural comparisons 
considered. Assesses the impact of families upon their members and the dynamics of 
marital and family relationships. Graduate Staff 

SOC 513 Community Organization and Development. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 
S(3-0). Community organization viewed as a process of bringing about desirable changes in 
community life. Community needs and resources studied. Democratic processes in com- 
munity action and principles of organization stressed, along with techniques and proce- 
dures. Roles of lay and professional workers analyzed. Graduate Staff 

SOC 514 Developing Societies. Preq.: Six hrs. SOC or ANT or grad. .standing or PBS 
status. 3(3-0). Defines major problems posed for development sociology and explores the 
social barriers and theoretical solutions for development set forth with regard to the 
newly-developing countries. Significant past strategies reviewed and main themes in 
current development schemes presented. Untested strategies for the future proposed and 
discussed. These problems examined in their national and international contexts. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 515 Deviant Behavior. Preq'. .Sir /(.rs. SOC or ANT or grad. standing or PBS status. 
3(3-0). Topics include: the inevitability of deviance and its social utility; cross-cultural 
variations in appearance and behavioral cues for labeling the deviant; descriptive and 
explanatory approaches to kinds and amounts of deviance in contemporary American 
society; social change, anomie and social disorganization theories; the process of stigmati- 
zation; formal and informal societal responses to deviance and the deviant; social action 
implications. Graduate Staff 

SOC 516 Social Control. Preq.: Six hrs. SOC above 200 level or grad. standing or PBS 
status. 3(3-0). The need, functions, utilization and effects of both informal and formal social 
control mechanisms examined. Theoretical perspectives on social control and the empirical 
support for these positions emphasized and critically evaluated. Graduate Staff 

SOC 520 Sociolog:y of Religion. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent or grad. standing or PBS 
status. 3(3-0). Alternative theoretical analyses presented for religious beliefs, practices and 
organizations and the relationships between these and other social phenomena. The utility 
and deficiencies of each conceptual framework assessed through general applications and 
case studies. Major research findings in this classical field of sociology reviewed. Contem- 
porary trends and issues concerning religion in society addressed. Graduate Staff 

SOC 523 Sociological Analysis of Agricultural Development. Preq.: Six hrs. SOC or 
grad. standing. 3(3-0). Systematic sociological analysis of agricultural development and 
change, emphasizing less-developed countries. Review of classical and contemporary theo- 
retical perspectives. Specific topics: land tenure and agricultural development; peasants 
and peasant societies; peasant revolt and revolution; women and development. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 534 Sociolo^ of U.S. Agriculture. Preqs.: Six hrs. of SOC or grad. standing. 3(3-0). 
Analysis of the structural transformation of U. S. agriculture in the 19th and 20th centur- 
ies, particularly in terms of the role of the state in agricultural development. Review of 
theoretical perspectives and research in rural sociology and the sociology of agriculture. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 541 Social Systems and Planned Change. Preq..- Threehrs. SOC. 3(3-0). An exami- 
nation of social systems within the framework of both functional theory and conflict theory, 
with particular emphasis upon system change and the planning of social change. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 555 Social Stratification. Preq.: Six hrs. SOC. 3(3-0). The theoretical background, 
methodological approaches and analysis of the consequences of systems of stratification. 
Emphasizes the static and dynamic qualities of stratification systems on relations within 
and between societies. Attention to the integrative and divisive quality of stratification as 
expressed in life styles, world views, etc. Graduate Staff 



294 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SOC (EB) 574 The Economics of Population. 3(3-0). (See economics and business.) 

SOC 590 Applied Research. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0). Studies research 
process with emphasis upon its application to action problems. The development of 
research design to meet action research needs stressed. Graduate Staff 

SOC 591 Special Topics in Sociology. Preq.: CI. 1-6. An examination of current prob- 
lems organized on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content varies as changing conditions 
require new approaches to emerging problems. Graduate Staff 

SOC 595 Practicum in Sociology. Preqs.: Grad. standing in the Master of Sociology 
program and 9 hrs. of SOC at the 500-600 level. 3-6. Opportunity for student under the 
supervision of graduate advisory committee chairman and organization/agency supervisor 
to develop and demonstrate competency in the area of graduate specialization through 
application of sociological knowledge to practical problems facing the organ ization/- 
agency. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

SOC 601 Urban Ecology. Preq.: SOC 509 or equivalent. 3(3-0). The course involves an 
h istor ical approach to the development of the field as well as an analysis of the present state 
of the field. Because of the range of subject matter subsumed under the topic of ecology, the 
linkages between sociology and other disciplines concerning themselves with the subject 
delineated and examined. Graduate Staff 

SOC 610 Formal Organizations. Preq.: SOC 511 or equivalent or another course on 
organizations or CI. 3(3-0). Sociological study of bureaucracies and other formal organiza- 
tions, including theoretical roots, current theory and research, especially on organization- 
environment relations. Sociological assessment of psychological, economic and managerial 
theories of organizations. Graduate Staff 

SOC 611 Research Methods in Sociology L Preqs.: SOC 300, ST 311 or equivalent. 
3(3-0). Issues in philosophy of science, causation, relationship of theory and research. 
Qualitative, experimental and survey design methodologies. Graduate Staff 

SOC 612 Scaling and Indexing for Social and Behavioral Data. Preqs.: ST 311, SOC 
A16or equivalent. 3(3-0). A basic introduction to the theory of measurement and scaling and 
to types of simple and composite measures used in the social and behavioral sciences. The 
development and utility of simple and composite indexes, paired comparison, equal appear- 
ing interval, summated rating cumulative, factor, latent structure and self-anchoring 
scales examined by means of problems and examples. Graduate Staff 

SOC 615 Research on Crime and Deviance. Preq.: SOC 515 or equivalent. 3(3-0). Major 
topics include: an examination of conceptual problems and research issues and methods in 
the study of crime and deviance; an assessment of current research on crime causation and 
deviance processes; an examination of research on social control processes and agencies; 
and an assessment of social action and evaluative research. A variety of substantive topics 
dealt with in the context of the above topical areas including: delinquency, drug usage, 
mental illness, obesity, stuttering, suicide, prostitution, homicide and rape. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 616 Crime and Collective Action. Preq.: SOC 515 or equivalent. 3(3-0). Examines 
organized and spontaneous community responses to criminality, other normative violations 
and unpopular governments. Compares and critiques alternative theoretical explanations 
for the emergence of legal and extralegal punishment. Applies sociological interpretations 
to contemporary community and societal policy including economic, political and social 
consequences of crime. Graduate Staff 

SOC 621 Social Psychology. Preq.: Six hrs. SOC. 3(3-0). The objective of this course is to 
present the major ideas of social psychology in the context of the theoretical orientations 
from which they have emerged. The nature and role of theory in social psychology exam- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 295 

ined. The social psychologies of various theorists then examined in terms of their particular 
approaches including the Gestalt, Field, Role, Psychoanalytic and Reinforcement orienta- 
tions and combinations of these. Graduate Staff 

SOC 628 Sociology of Gender. Preq.: SOC 512 or CI. 3(3-0). Reviews micro- and macro- 
level theories which explain the development and patterns of gendered behavior. Emphasis 
is on understanding gender as a variable in research. Focus on both how gender roles have 
developed and how individuals come to exhibit gender-typed behavior. Graduate Staff 

SOC 631 Population Analysis. Preq.: SOC 509 or equivalent. 3(3-0). Methods of describ- 
ing, analyzing and presenting data on human populations; distribution, characteristics, 
natural increase, migration and trends in relation to resources. Graduate Staff 

SOC 632 Contemporary Family Theory and Research. Preq.: SOC 512 or CI. 3(3-0). 
Emphasis on contemporary research, theory and methodological techniques used by sociol- 
ogists who study families. Critical examination of where the field is now and where it 
appears to be heading. Primarily for graduate students designing or doing research about 
families. Graduate Staff 

SOC 633 The Community. Preq.: Six hrs. SOC. 3(3-0). The community viewed in socio- 
logical perspective as a functioning entity. A method of analysis presented and applied to 
eight "dimensions," with emphasis on the unique types of understanding to be derived from 
measuring each dimension. Finally, the effect of change on community integration and 
development analyzed. Graduate Staff 

SOC 641 Statistics in Sociology. Preq.: ST 507 or equivalent. 3(3-0). The application of 

statistical methods of sociological research. Emphasis on selecting appropriate models, 
instruments and techniques for the more frequently encountered problems and forms of 
data. Graduate Staff 

SOC 645 Advanced Sociological MesLSurement. Preqs.: SOC 61 1; ST 507 or equivalent. 
3(3-0). Various issues concerning the measurement of social variables examined and tech- 
niques described. These issues and techniques include operationalism and epistemic corre- 
lation, levels of measurement, transformations, social indicators, scaling, dimensionality, 
validity and reliability. Existing examples and potential applications in sociological 
research considered. Graduate Staff 

SOC 646 Advanced Sociological Analysis. Preqs.: SOC 611; ST 507 or equivalent. 3(3-0). 
Advanced analysis techniques adaptable to the needs of sociological research examined. 
Special attention given to causal analysis, the analysis of change, and aggregate versus 
individual level data analyses. Sociological examples considered. Emerging issues and 
techniques given attention. Graduate Staff 

SOC 650 Contemporary Sociological Theory. Preq.: SOC 511 or equivalent. 3(3-0). 
Works by major figures who represent leading schools of sociological theory in the post- 
World War II period are studied as primary sources. Underlying assumptions are made 
explicit, the structure of the theory, including propositions, are examined critically, and 
relationships with other theoretical perspectives are discussed. Graduate Staff 

SOC 652 Comparative Societies. Preq.: Six hrs. SOC. 3(3-0). Sociological analysis of 
societies around the world with particular reference to North and South America. Special 
emphasis given to cultural and physical setting, population composition, levels of living, 
relationship of the people to the land, structure and function of the major institutions and 
forces making for change. Graduate Staff 

SOC 655 Theory Construction. Preq.: SOC 511 or equivalent. 3(3-0). Provides students 
with a capability to develop theoretical frames of reference within which to devise and 
implement research activities. Acquaints students with the philosophical and disciplinary 
bases of theory, establishes the relationship between theory and research and enables 
objective evaluation of theoretical positions encountered in the literature. Graduate Staff 



296 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SOC 671 Social Demography. Preq.: SOC 509 or 631 or equivalents. 3(3-0). The basic 
purpose of this course is to develop on the part of the student an appreciation of the 
sociological variables capable of being used in demographic research and to provide an 
overview of the current substantive knowledge concerning social and demographic sys- 
tems, social action systems and social aggregate systems. Graduate Staff 

SOC 690 Seminar. Credits Arranged. Appraisal of current literature; presentation of 
research papers by students; progress reports on departmental research; review of develop- 
ing research methods and plans; reports from scientific meetings and conferences; other 
professional matters. Graduate Staff 

SOC 699 Research in Sociology. Preq.: Consent of chair of graduate study committee. 
Credits Arranged. Planning and execution of research and preparation of manuscript 
under supervision of graduate committee. Graduate Staff 

Speech-Communication 

SP 556 Seminar in Organizational Communication. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or 
grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Theoretic and applied approaches for studying communication 
perspectives of organizational behavior. Topics relate communication with organizational 
theories, research methods, leadership, power, attraction, conflict and theory development. 



Soil Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E.J. Kamprath, Acting Head 

Professors: S. W. Buol, D. K. Cassel, M. G. Cook, F. R. Cox, G. A. Cummings, C. B. 
Davey, J. W. Gilliam, W. A. Jackson, L. D. King, G. S. Miner, C. D. Raper Jr., P. 
A. Sanchez, E. D. Seneca, R. W. Skaggs, R. J. Volk, J. B. Weber, S. B. Weed, A. 
G. Wollum II; Professor (USDA): D. W. Israel; Extension Professors: J. V. 
Baird, J. P. Zublena; Visiting Professors: D. E. Bandy, M. D. Openshaw; 
Professors Emeriti: W. V. Bartholomew, R. W. Cummings, J. W. Fitts, C. B. 
McCants, J. A. Phillips, W. G. Woltz, W. W. Woodhouse Jr.; Associate Profes- 
sors: H. L. Allen Jr., A. Amoozegar, S. W. Broome, M. T. Hoover, G. D. Hoyt, H. 
J. Kleiss, R. Lea, J. P. Lilly, J. E. Shelton, M. J. Vepraskas; Extension Associate 
Professor: G. C. Naderman; Adjunct Associate Professor: D. W. Eaddy; Asso- 
ciate Professor Emeritus: R. E. McCollum; Assistant Professor: T. J. Smyth; 
Visiting Assistant Professor: J. C. Alegre; Assistant Professor Emeritus: C. K. 
Martin; Senior Researcher: W. P. Robarge; Visiting Lecturer: R. B. Daniels 

The Department of Soil Science offers graduate programs leading to the 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. These are research-oriented 
degrees and require a thesis/dissertation based on individual research on some 
aspect of the science. In addition, the Master of Agriculture degree (non-thesis) 
may be obtained through the department. 

Each M.S. and Ph.D. student will participate in one of many active research 
projects supervised by personnel in the department. The research may be special- 
ized in one of the traditional sub-disciplines, e.g., soil chemistry or it may inte- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 297 

grate subject matter from related disciplines to address current societal needs, 
e.g., waste management. Several of the projects are interdepartmental in charac- 
ter and, thus, a student may develop a particularly strong supportive program in 
one of the cooperating departments. 

The department provides opportunities for students to tailor their programs 
for careers in research, teaching, extension or international programs. A student 
interested in one of these areas is encouraged to add this special dimension to the 
research emphasis required of all students. Arrangements for these opportuni- 
ties are made on an individual basis with appropriate faculty. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

SSC 501 Tropical Soils: Characteristics and Management. Preq.: Six credits in SSC. 
3(3-0) S. Characteristics of the tropical environment. Distribution and classification of 
tropical soils. Soil-plant relationships in the tropics. Soil management systems emphasiz- 
ing shifting cultivation, flooded rice production, subsistence farming and tropical pasture 
management. Sanchez 

SSC 511 Soil Physics. Preqs.: SSC 200, PY 212. M3-3) F. The study of soil physical 
properties and theory of selected instrumentation to measure them. Topics include soil 
solids, soil water, air and heat. Transport processes and the energy concept of soil and water 
are emphasized. Cassel 

SSC 520 Soil and Plant Analysis. Preqs.: PY 212; CH 315; at least three soils courses 
including SSC 3J^1 or CI. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. Theory and advanced principles of the utilization 
of chemical instruments to aid research on the heterogeneous systems of soils and plants. 

Gilliam 

SSC 522 Soil Chemistry. Preqs.: SSC 200, one yr. of general inorganic chemistry. 3(3-0) S. 
A consideration of the chemical and colloidal properties of clay and soil systems, including 
ion exchange and retention, soil solution reactions, solvation of clays and electrokinetic 
properties of clay-water systems. Weed 

SSC (MB) 532 Soil Microbiology. Preqs.: MB ^01; CH 220 or CI. U(3-3) S. Soil as a 
medium for microbial growth, the relation of microbes to important mineral transforma- 
tions in soil, the importance of biological equilibrium and significance of soil microbes to 
environmental quality. Wollum 

SSC 541 Soil Fertility. Preq.: SSC 3J,1. 3(3-0) F. Soil conditions affecting plant growth 
and the chemistry of soil and fertilizer interrelationships. Factors affecting the availability 
of nutrients. Methods of measuring nutrient availability. Kamprath 

SSC 551 Soil Morphology, Genesis and Classification. Preqs.: MEA 120, SSC 200, SSC 
3Ifl. 3(3-0) F. Morphology: Chemical, physical and mineralogical parameters useful in 
characterizing soil. Genesis: Soil-forming factors and processes. Classification: Historical 
development and present concepts of soil taxonomy with particular reference to worldwide 
distribution of great soil groups as well as discussions of logical bases of soil classification. 

Buol 

SSC 553 Soil Mineralogy. Preqs.: SSC 200, SSC 3J,1, MEA 330. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. 
Composition, structure, classification, identification, origin, occurrence and significance of 
soil minerals with emphasis on primary weatherable silicates, layer silicate clays and 
sesquioxides. Weed 

SSC 560 Advanced Soil Management. Preqs.: SSC 200, 3^1. 3(3-0) Sum. Alt. yrs. 
Studies of soil characteristics in the coastal plain, piedmont and mountain areas of North 
Carolina. Discussion of management practices that should be associated with various soils 
for different types of enterprises. Two overnight field trips required. Graduate Staff 



298 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SSC 590 Special Problems. Preq.: SSC 200. Credits Arranged. F,S. Special problems in 
various phases of soils. Emphasis placed on review of recent and current research. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

SSC (CS, HS) 614 Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science.) 

SSC 651 Pedology. Preqs.: SSC 522, 511; SSC 551 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. A 
critical study of current theories and concepts in soil genesis, morphology and classifi- 
cation. Buol 

SSC (BAE) 671 Theory of Drainage— Saturated Flow. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. (See biologi- 
cal and agricultural engineering.) 

SSC 672 Soil Properties and Plant Development. Pretys.. -50// 55i, SSC 52:2 or eg^ivaZ- 

ent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. An examination of the interrelationships of soil properties and plant 
characteristics which regulate inorganic ion accumulation and dry matter production in 
higher plants. Jackson 

SSC (FOR) 673 Forest Productivity: Edaphic Relationships. 3(2-3) F. Alt. yrs. (See 
forestry.) 

SSC (BAE) 674 Theory of Drainage— Unsaturated Flow. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See 
biological and agricultural engineering.) 

SSC 690 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standingin SSC. 1(1-0) F,S. A maximum of two semester 
hours allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward the doctorate. Scientific 
articles, progress reports in research and special problems of interest to soil scientists 
reviewed and discussed. Graduate Staff 

SSC 693 Colloquium in Soil Science. Preq.: Grad. standing in SSC. Credits Arranged. 
F,S. Seminar-type discussions and lectures on specialized and advanced topics in soil 
science. Graduate Staff 

SSC 699 Research. Preq.: Grad. standing in SSC. Credits Arranged. F,S. A maximum of 
six semester hours allowed toward the master's degree but any number towards the 
doctorate. Graduate Staff 



Solid State Sciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. Lucovsky, Chair 

Professors: K. J. Bachmann, S. M. Bedair, R. F. Davis, R. E. Fornes, J. R. Hauser, 
J. J. Hren, M. A. Littlejohn, J. Narayan, G. Rozgonyi, D. E. Sayers, J. F. 
Schetzina, A. F. Schreiner, E. 0. Stejskal, M. H. Whangbo, J. J. Wortman; 
A.ssociate Professors: J . Bernholc, R. M. Kolbas, R. J. Nemanich, M. A. Paesler, 
P. E. Russell; Assistant Professor: G. A. Ruggles 

The university offers courses of study leading to a minor in solid state sciences 
as part of the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. This option 
is available to all graduate students pursuing research in the broad area of solid 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 299 

state science and requires that a member of the solid state sciences faculty serve 
on the student's research committee. 

Solid state sciences is an interdisciplinary area of research that applies and 
extends concepts from the traditional academic disciplines of chemistry, electri- 
cal and computer engineering, materials science and engineering, and physics to 
basic and applied problems with a primary focus on solid state materials. At 
NCSU. there are a significant number of such research programs that involve 
faculty and students in more than one of the academic departments listed above. 
This minor program can be customized to provide a course complement for these 
ongoing programs, as well as for any additional solid state materials research 
programs as they are initiated, developed and implemented. 

To fulfill the academic requirements for a minor in solid state sciences, each 
master's student must successfully complete at least three, and each doctoral 
student, four of the courses in the solid states sciences curriculum. A partial 
listing of courses in this program includes: CH 501, 503 Advanced Inorganic 
Chemistry I. II; CH 531, 631 Chemical Thermodynamics I, II; CH 533 Chemical 
Kinetics; CH 537 Quantum Chemistry; ECE 530 Physical Electronics; ECE 539 
Integrated Circuit Technology and Fabrication; ECE 623 Optical Properties of 
Semiconductors; ECE 624 Electronic Properties of Solid State Devices; ECE 
(PY) 627 Semiconductor Thin Films Technology; MAT 512 Scanning Electron 
Microscopy; MAT 515 Fundamentals of Transmission Electron Microscopy; 
MAT 560 Materials Science and Processing of Semiconductor Devices; MAT 595 
Advanced Materials Experiments; MAT 612 Advanced Scanning Electron 
Microscopy and Surface Analysis; MAT 660 Defects, Diffusion and Ion Implan- 
tation in Semiconductors; MAT 692 Advanced Topics in Materials Science and 
Engineering; PY (ECE) 552, 553 Introduction to the Structure of Solids I, II. In 
addition, other courses (for example, special topics courses in any one of the 
participating departments) may also be substituted into an individual student's 
designated solid state sciences minor program at the discretion of his/her 
committee. 

Special Education 

For information on this program, see curriculum and instruction under 
education. 

Statistics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. L. Solomon, Head 

Professor T. M. Gerig, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: B. B. Bhattacharyya, P. Bloomfield, D. D. Boos, C. C. Cockerham, D. 
A. Dickey, A. R. Gallant, F. G. Giesbrecht, H. J. Gold, T. Johnson, K. H. Pollock, 
C. H. Proctor, C. P. Quesenberry, J. 0. Rawlings, D. L. Ridgeway, W. H. 
Swallow, H. R. van der Vaart, J. L. Wasik, B. S. Weir, 0. Wesler; Adjunct 



300 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Professors: M. W. Anderson, J. R. Chromy, A. L. Finkner, J. H. Goodnight, A. 
R. Manson. R. L. Obenchain; Professors Emeriti: A. H. E. Grandage, R. J. 
Hader. D. W. Hayne, D. D. Mason, R. J. Monroe, L. A. Nelson, J. A. Rigney, R. 
G. D. Steel; Associate Professors: R. L. Berger, C. Brownie, E. J. Dietz, S. P. 
Ellner, A. C. Linnerud, J. F. Monahan, D. W. Nychka, S. G. Pantula, T. W. 
Reiland, C. E. Smith, L. A. Stefanski; Associate Professor (USDA): K. P. 
Burnha.Tn; Adjunct Associate Professors: B. G. Cox, W. W. Fiegorsch; Assistant 
Professors: M. David ian, J.-C. Lu 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: W. R. Atchley, M. M. Goodman, W. L. Hafley, V. K. Smith; Associate 
Professor: T. H. Emigh; Assistant Professor: A. R. Hall 

The Department of Statistics offers programs leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in both statistics and biomathematics and to 
the Master of Statistics and Master of Biomathematics degrees. It also offers 
co-major and joint Ph.D. programs with other departments including economics 
and business, crop science, genetics, biomathematics, operations research, fore- 
stry and computer studies. Flexible minor programs in statistics are offered at 
the Master's and Ph.D. levels. With a graduate faculty of 36 representing virtu- 
ally all major statistical specializations, the department is recognized as a world 
leader in graduate education and research in statistics. Its applied orientation 
sets it apart from most other departments in the country, offering training to 
those wishing to pursue careers as consulting statisticians in industry and 
government as well as to those seeking careers in research and teaching. 

Areas of research specialization of the faculty and advanced graduate students 
include time series, biomathematics, econometrics, quantitative genetics and 
ecology, experimental design and analysis, multivariate analysis, sampling, life 
science applications, quality control, statistical computing, nonparametric 
regression, robust and nonparametric inference, mathematical programming, 
Bayesian inference, decision theory and stochastic processes. 

The department provides consulting services to many other departments. This 
function places the department in a unique position in the University community, 
offering opportunities for collaboration and providing students with hands-on 
consulting experiences. 

In addition to its ongoing program, the department houses three special 
groups. The Biomathematics Graduate Program, which is described under bio- 
mathematics, offers its own degrees and supports a research program. The 
Quantitative Genetics Research Program is an internationally respected re- 
search group of faculty, post-doctoral fellows and graduate students. The Sou- 
theastern Cooperative Fish and Game Statistics Project provides statistical con- 
sulting services to wildlife agencies in the southeast. Training and research in 
wildlife statistics are supported through this project. 

The well-prepared applicant to the department's Master's program has good 
grades in a three-semester calculus sequence, a two-semester advanced calculus 
sequence, a semester of linear algebra and a two-semester sequence in probabil- 
ity and statistics. Some of these courses may be taken as part of the program but 
this may result in lengthening the stay. Admission to our Ph.D. program is 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 301 

granted to students who have passed the departmental Basic Comprehensive 
Examination at the Ph.D. level. A suitably prepared student can complete the 
Master's degree in two years. The Ph.D. usually requires three years beyond the 
Master's. 

Departmental assistantships and fellowships are awarded each year on a 
competitive basis. Fellowships are provided through the Department's Gertrude 
M. Cox Fellowship Fund. Approximately 25 teaching assistantships and 25 
research assistantships are also available. 

Extensive library facilities are available in the area including the University's 
D. H. Hill Library, the Statistics departmental library, and those at Duke Uni- 
versity and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

The department provides extensive computing support for its students. The 
department computing laboratory houses terminals and IBM-PC and PC/AT 
microcomputers, as well as graphics terminals (Tektronix 4105 and Vectrix VX 
384) and an 8-pen plotter (Tex 4662A). The department data switch provides 
access to remote and local computing facilities, as well as the D. H. Hill Library 
Bibliographic Information System (BIS). A powerful remote computer is the 
IBM 3081 (Model K) located at the Triangle Universities Computer Center; the 
NCSU Computer Center operates an IBM 4381 using CMS. The department 
DEC VAX 11/750 provides interactive computing and graphics in a VMS/EU- 
NICE (UNIX emulator) environment. Software, languages and statistical pack- 
ages available on the IBM systems include SAS, IMSL, SPSS, Fortran, APL and 
Pascal, among many others; on the VAX, Fortran, C, S and the graphics system 
DI-3000 are available. 

Currently, employment opportunities are excellent for statisticians trained at 
all levels. The department regularly receives notification of job openings from 
industry, government and academic institutions. The National Science Founda- 
tion predicts a shortage of statisticians in the coming years. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ST 421, 422 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. Preq.: U21) MA 202 or MA 212; 
(U22) ST 1,21. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ST 430 Introduction to Regression Analysis. Preq.: ST 302. 3(3-0) F. 

ST 43 1 Introduction to Statistics. Preq.: ST 372 or ST U02. 3(3-0) S. 

ST 435 Statistical Methods for Quality and Productivity. Preq.: ST 302. 3(3-0) F. 

ST 445 Introduction to Statistical Computing and Data Management. Preq.: ST 302. 
3(3-0) S. 

ST 493 Special Topics in Statistics. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ST 505 Applied Nonparametric Statistics. Pre?.; ST572 or 57.57;. 3(3-0) S. Statistical 
methods that require relatively mild assumptions about the form of the population distri- 
bution. Hypothesis testing, point and interval estimation and multiple comparison proce- 
dures for a variety of statistical problems. Dietz 



302 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ST (ZO) 506 Sampling Animal Populations. Preq.: ST 512. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Statistical 
methods applicable to sampling of wildlife populations, including capture-recapture, re- 
moval, change in ratio, quadrat and line transect sampling. Emphasis on model assump- 
tions and study design. Pollock 

ST 507 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 1. 3(3-0) F. A general introduction to the 
use of descriptive and inferential statistics in behavioral science research. Methods for 
describing and summarizing data presented, followed by procedures for estimating popu- 
lation parameters and testing hypotheses concerning the summarized data. 

Dietz, Gold, Swallow, Wasik 

ST 508 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences II. Preq.: ST 507 or CI. 3(3-0) S. The use of 
statistical design principles in behavioral science research introduced. The use of a statisti- 
cal model to represent the structure of data collected from a designed experiment or survey 
study presented. Opportunities provided for use of a computer to perform analyses of data, 
to evaluate the proposed statistical model and to assist in post-hoc analysis procedures. 
Least squares principles used to integrate the topics of multiple linear regression analysis, 
the analysis of variance and analysis of covariance. Swallow, Wasik 

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences I. Preq.: ST 311 or grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Basic concepts of statistical models and use of samples; variation, 
statistical measures, distributions, tests of significance, analysis of variance and elemen- 
tary experimental design, regression and correlation, chi-square. Graduate Staff 

ST 512 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences II. Preq.: ST 511 or equivalent 
3(3-0) F,S. Covariance, multiple regression, curvilinear regression, concepts of experimen- 
tal design, factorial experiments, confounded factorials, individual degrees of freedom and 
split-plot designs. Graduate Staff 

ST 514 Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences II. Preq.: ST 507 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) S. Extension of basic statistical concepts to computer handling of data from social 
surveys; sample designs using clustered, stratified, systematic and multi-stage selections; 
analysis of variance continued; multiple, multivariate regression. Johnson, Proctor 

ST 515, 516 Experimental Statistics for Engineers. Preq.: (515) ST 361 or grad. 
standing; (516) ST 515. 3(3-0) F,S. General statistical concepts and techniques useful to 
research workers in engineering, textiles, wood technology, etc. Probability distributions, 
measurement of precision, simple and multiple regression, tests of significance, analysis of 
variance, enumeration data and experimental designs. Nychka, Quesenberry 

ST 517 Applied Least Squares. Preq.: ST i02 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Least squares 
estimation and hypothesis testing procedures for linear models. Regression, analysis of 
variance and covariance considered in a unified manner that requires no extensive 
mathematical background. Emphasis on the use of the computer to apply these techniques 
to experimental (including unequal cell sizes) and survey situations. Rawlings 

ST 518 Applied Time Series Analysis. Preq.: ST 512. 3(3-0) F. An introduction to the use 
of statistical methods for analyzing and forecasting data observed over time. Trigonomet- 
ric regression, periodogram/spectral analysis. Smoothing. Autoregressive moving average 
models. Regression with autocorrelated errors. Linear filters and bivariate spectral analy- 
sis. Methods and applications stressed; software implementations described and used in 
assignments. Bloomfield, Dickey, Monahan, Pantula 

ST 519 Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. Preq.: ST 512 or equivalent. 3(3-0)8. 
An introduction to the use of multivariate statistical methods in the analysis of data 
collected in experiments and surveys. Topics covered include multivariate analysis of 
variance, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation analysis and principal components 
analysis. The use of a computer to perform the multivariate statistical analysis calculations 
emphasized. Gerig, Monahan 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 303 

ST 521 Statistical Theory I. Coreqs.: MA U25 or MA 511 and MA U05. 3(2-2) F. Discus- 
sion of the use of statistics as illustrated by an example pointing out the need for a 
probabilistic framework. The probability tools for statistics: description of discrete and 
absolutely continuous distributions, expected values, moments, moment generating func- 
tions, transformation of random variables, marginal and conditional distributions, inde- 
pendence, order statistics, multivariate distributions, concept of random sample, deriva- 
tion of many sampling distributions. Berger 

ST 522 Statistical Theory II. Preq.: ST 521; Careq.: MA U26 or MA 512. 3(2-2) S. General 
framework for statistical inference. Point estimators: biased and unbiased, minimum 
variance unbiased, least mean square error, maximum likelihood and least squares, 
asymptotic properties. Interval estimators and tests of hypotheses: confidence intervals, 
power functions, Neyman-Pearson lemma, likelihood ratio tests, unbiasedness, efficiency 
and sufficiency. Berger 

ST 531 Design of Experiments. Preq.: ST U02 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Review of com- 
pletely randomized, randomized complete block and Latin square designs and the basic 
concepts in the techniques of experimental design. Designs and analysis methods in factor- 
ial experiments, confounded factorials, response surface methodology, change-over design, 
split-plot experiments and incomplete block designs. Examples used to illustrate applica- 
tion and analysis of these designs. Giesbrecht, Swallow 

ST 535 Statistical Quality Control. Preq.: ST 515. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Modern quality 
control for students with a calculus-level prerequisite course in engineering statistics. 
Emphasis upon on-line QC methods including classic charting techniques and modern 
methods for automated control of processes. Off-line QC topics include methods for sam- 
pling inspection and topics from experimental design applied to parameter and allowance 
design. Quesenberry 

ST (MA) 541 Theory of Probability I. 3(3-0) F. (See mathematics.) 

ST (MA) 542 Introduction to Stochastic Processes. Preqs.: MA Jt05 and MA 541 or ST 

521. 3(3-0) S. Markov chains and Markov processes, Poisson process, birth and death 
processes, queuing theory, renewal theory, stationary processes, Brownian motion. 

Bhattacharyya, Wesler 

ST 550 Intermediate Statistical Methods. Preqs.: ST 512 and ST 522. 3(3-0) F. Intro- 
duction to statistical models and methodologies for survival analysis (parametric and 
non-parametric), bioassay, logistic regression and categorical data analysis (log-linear 
model and weighted least squares approaches). Software implementations described and 
used in assignments. Stefanski, Gerig 

ST (EB) 561 Intermediate Econometrics. 3(3-0) S. (See economics and business.) 

ST (TOX) 563 Statistical Problems in Toxicology. Preq.: ST 511 or equivalent. 2(2-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. Introduction to statistical issues arising in toxicological research, including review 
of standard statistical techniques. Special topics include teratological and short-term 
mutagenicity studies, long-term cancer bioassays, epidemiology, risk assessment and the 
use of historical controls. Brownie 

ST (BMA, MA) 571 Biomathematics I. 3(3-0) F. (See biomathematics.) 

ST (BMA, MA) 572 Biomathematics II. 3(3-0) S. (See biomathematics.) 

ST (BMA, OR) 575 Decision Analytic Modeling. Preqs.: MA 421 or ST 421 plus ST 511 
or ST 516. 4(3-2) F. Alt. yrs. Analysis of decision problems involving risk and uncertainty. 
Modeling the decision process; Bayesian probability analysis, use of information, and 
subjective probability; utility theory and multiattribute utility assessment; dynamics of 
interacting with decision makers and subject matter specialists; decision trees, influence 



304 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

diagrams and other tools to assist in modeling decision problems. Laboratory develops skill 
in implementing the methodology. Gold 

ST 581 Robust and Nonparametric Statistics. Preq.: ST 522. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Theory 
and methods for standard inference problems where the normal distribution may not 
correctly describe the error distribution. Topics include rank and order statistics, permu- 
tation methods, bootstrap, jackknife, Pitman efficiency, influence curve, breakdown point, 
M-estimation and minimum distance estimation. Boos 

ST 583 Introduction to Statistical Decision Theory. Preq.: ST 522. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 
Zero sum two-person games and statistical inference. Bayesian methods and orthodox 
statistical estimation and testing; minimax decision rules; empirical Bayes procedures; 
Bayes sequential decision procedures. Berger, Bhattacharyya, Monahan 

ST 591 Special Problems. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S,Sum. Development of techniques for spe- 
cialized cases, particularly in connection with thesis and practical consulting problems. 

Graduate Staff 

ST 595 Statistical Consulting. Preqs.: ST 512 and ST 522. 1(1-1) F,S,Sum. Participation 
in regularly scheduled supervised statistical consulting sessions with faculty member and 
client. Consultant's report written for each session. Regularly scheduled meetings with 
course instructor and other student consultants to present and discuss consulting ex- 
periences. Brownie 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ST (MA, OR) 606 Nonlinear Programming. Preqs.: OR (IE, MA) 505 and MA A25 or 

equivalent. 3(3-0) F. This course provides an advanced mathematical treatment of the 
analytical and algorithmic aspects of finite dimensional nonlinear programming. It 
includes an examination of the structure and effectiveness of computational methods for 
unconstrained and constrained minimization. Special attention directed toward current 
research and recent developments in the field. Peterson, Reiland 

ST (BMA, MA, OR) 610 Stochastic Modeling. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. (See biomathematics.) 

ST 613 Time Series Analysis: Time Domain. Preqs.: ST 512 and ST 522. 3(3-0) S. Alt. 
yrs. Estimation inference for coefficients in autoregressive, moving average and mixed 
models and large sample. Distributici tv^^^r.-v for autocovariances and their use in identifi- 
cation of time series models. Stationanty and seasonality. Extensions of theory and 
methods to multiple series including vector autoregressions, transfer function models, 
regression with time series errors, state space modeling. Dickey, Pantula 

ST 614 Time Series Analysis: Frequency Domain. Preqs.: ST 512 and ST 522. 3(3-0) S. 
Alt. yrs. Theory and methods of time series analysis from the frequency point of view. 
Harmonic analysis, complex demodulation and spectrum estimation. Frequency domain 
structure of stationary time series and space-time processes. Sampling distributions of 
commonly used statistics. Bloomfield 

ST (MA) 617, 618 Measure Theory and Advanced Probability. Preqs.: (617) MA U26; 
ST521 or MA 5A1 or equivalent; (618) ST 617. 3(3-0) F,S. Modern measure and integration 
theory in abstract spaces. Probability measures, random variables, expectations. Distribu- 
tions and characteristic functions. Modes of convergence. Independence, zero-one laws, 
laws of large numbers, three-series theorem. Central limit problem. Conditional expecta- 
tions, martingales and martingale convergence theorems. Bhattacharyya, Wesler 

ST 623 Statistics in Plant Science. Preq.: ST 512 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Principles and 
techniques of planning, establishing and executing field and greenhouse experiments. Size, 
shape and orientation of plots; border effects; estimation of size of experiments for specified 
accuracy; subsampling plots and yields for laboratory analysis; combining data from a 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 305 

series of years and/or locations; rotation experiments; soil test correlation; multiple com- 
parisons in variety trial results; selection of predictors in multiple regression; introduction 
to interspecies and intraspecies plant competition experiments and models. 

Graduate Staff 

ST (GN) 626 Statistical Concepts in Genetics. Preq.: GN 506; Coreq.: STU02 or equival- 
ent. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Migration, mutation, selection, drift, linkage, mating system and 
other processes that bear on rates of change in population frequencies, means and varian- 
ces; magnitude and nature of genotypic and nongenotypic variability and their role in 
alternative procedures of plant and animal breeding; experimental and statistical 
approaches to the analysis of quantitative inheritance. Cockerham 

ST 631 Theory of Sampling Applied to Survey Design. Preqs.: MA 21U or equivalent; 
ST U02 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Principles for interpretation and design of sample surveys. 
Estimator biases, variances and comparative costs. Simple random sample, cluster sample, 
ratio estimation, stratification, varying probabilities of selection. Multi-stage, systematic 
and double sampling. Response errors. Pollock, Proctor 

ST 637 Advanced Statistical Inference. Preqs.: ST 522, ST 617. 3(3-0) S. This course 
treats the classical areas of statistical inference, estimation and hypothesis testing, at the 
measure-theoretical level. Emphasis upon treatment of these areas in depth. 

Graduate Staff 

ST 639 Large Sample Theory. Preq.: ST 522. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. Use of classical probabil- 
ity theorems to prove consistency and asymptotic distribution results for a wide variety of 
sample statistics. Examples of such statistics include maximum likelihood estimators, 
quadratic form test statistics and regression coefficients. Boos 

ST 645 Statistical Computing. Preq.: ST 681. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. The intent of the course is 
to provide the statistician with the computational tools for statistical research and applica- 
tions using digital computing machinery. Topics to be covered include random number 
generation and Monte Carlo methods, regression computations and application to statisti- 
cal methods of optimization, sorting and Fast Fourier transform. Monahan 

ST (EB) 651 Econometrics. 3(3-0) F. (See economics and business.) 

ST (EB) 652 Topics in Econometrics. 3(3-0) S. (See economics and business.) 

ST 671 Advanced Analysis of Variance and Variance Components. Preqs.: STU02 or 
equivalent, ST 681. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Expected mean squares, exact and approximate tests 
of hypotheses for balanced and unbalanced data sets. Fixed, mixed and random models. 
Randomization theory. Estimation of variance components using regression, MINQUE 
and general quadratic unbiased estimation theory. Giesbrecht 

ST 674 Advanced Topics in Construction and Analysis of Experimental Designs. 

Preqs.: ST U02 or equivalent, ST 681. 3(3-0). S. Alt. yrs. Construction and analysis of 
multifactor designs, factorials, fractional factorials, balanced incomplete block designs, 
Latin squares, orthogonal arrays of strength d and response surface designs. Fractionating 
mixed level factorials, confounding and blocking techniques, study of robustness of designs 
to loss of design point. Giesbrecht 

ST 681 Linear Models and Variance Components. Preqs.: MA W5, ST 521; Coreq.: ST 
522. 3(2-2) S. Theory of estimation and testing in full and non-full rank linear models. 
Normal theory distributional properties. Least squares principle and the Gauss-Markoff 
theorem. Estimability and properties of best linear unbiased estimators. The general linear 
hypothesis. Application of dummy variable methods to elementary classification models for 
balanced and unbalanced data. Analysis of covariance. Variance components estimation 
for balanced data. Pantula 



306 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ST 682 Multivariate Linear Models and Nonlinear Models. Preqs.: ST 512, ST 681. 
3(3-0) F. Inference for the multivariate general linear model. Normal theory distributional 
properties. Wishart matrices, Wilks' lambda criterion and Roy's maximum root test. 
Univariate and multivariate nonlinear models. Modified Gauss-Newton method for obtain- 
ing estimates. Asymptotic properties of estimators. Inference through the likelihood ratio 
test, the Lagrange multiplier test and the Wald test. Applications using computer 
implementation. Gallant 

ST 683 Multivariate Analysis. Preqs.: ST 522 and ST 682. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Survey of 
multivariate statistical theory. Multivariate distributions including the multinormal, 
Wishart, Hotelling's T^, Fisher-Roy-Hsu, Wilks' V and multivariate Beta distributions. 
Applications of maximum likelihood estimation, likelihood ratio testing and the union- 
intersection principle. Development of the theory of Hotelling's T^ tests and confidence sets, 
discriminant analysis, canonical correlation, multivariate analysis of variance and princi- 
pal components. Gerig, Monahan 

ST 691 Advanced Special Problems. Preqs.: ST A02 or equivalent, ST 681. l-3F,S,Sum. 
Any new advance in the field of statistics which can be presented in lecture series as unique 
opportunities arise. Graduate Staff, Visiting Professors 

ST 694 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

ST 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Graduate Staff 

Textiles 

Professor R. A. Earnhardt, Dean 

For a listing of Graduate Faculty and department information, see Textile 
Engineering, Chemistry and Science, and Textile and Apparel Management. 

The College of Textiles offers programs leading to the Master of Science degree 
in textile chemistry and in textiles with specializations in engineering and 
science and in management and technology, the professional degree of Master of 
Textiles and the Doctor of Philosophy in fiber and polymer science. (See fiber and 
polymer science for a description of the program.) The College of Textiles also 
participates in the Master of Science in management program in which students 
combine studies in the Department of Economics and Business with courses from 
the Department of Textile and Apparel Management (see management). 

Students otherwise meeting the requirements of the Graduate School and with 
Bachelor of Science degrees with majors in textiles, management, or business 
administration (with adequate preparation in chemistry, physics and mathemat- 
ics), the physical sciences or engineering will normally qualify for the graduate 
degree programs. 

The minimum requirement for a Master of Textiles degree is the satisfactory 
completion of 33 semester hours of advanced courses. There is no thesis or foreign 
language requirement. This program offers the student advanced professional 
training with emphasis on management, CAD/CAM quality or manufacturing 
control, technology, machine design or textile design. 

The programs of study for the Master of Science degree include a minimum of 
30 semester hours of advanced courses, including six semester hours devoted to a 
thesis based on research conducted by the student. There is no foreign language 
requirement. The plan of course work and the research activities for the Master 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 307 

of Science degree are designed to prepare the student for a career in research, 
development, management or other technical phases of the fiber textile, apparel 
and allied industries. Students may minor in one or more of a number of asso- 
ciated fields. 

Programs of study may be arranged to develop a broad background in three 
general areas: advanced textile materials science, the engineering, technology 
and management of textile and apparel manufacturing processes; and textile 
chemistry. Students may carry out research on such topics as polymer and fiber 
chemistry; fiber, textile and apparel manufacturing; the physical and mechani- 
cal properties of fibers and textiles; textile dyeing and finishing; marketing and 
production management; engineering economics, information technology and 
quantitative decision making; etc. 

Fiber and Polymer Science 

See fiber and polymer science for a list of associated>courses. 

Textiles (General Courses) 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

T 401 Environmental Aspects of the Textile Industry. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

T 402 Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Fiber Formation. Preqs.: CH103, T 
203, MA 212, PY212. 3(3-0) S. 

T 491H Honors Seminar in Textiles. By invitation into Honors Program in Textiles. 
1(1-0) F,S. 

T 493 Industrial Internship in Textiles. Preq.: Textile core courses. 3 F,S,Sum. 

Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science 

Professor C. D. Livengood, Head 

Professor G. N. Mock, Assistant Head, Undergraduate Programs 

Professor B. S. Gupta, Assistant Head, (Graduate Programs 

Professors: R. L. Barker, K. R. Beck, D. R. Buchanan, J. A. Cuculo, A. H. 
El-Shiekh, H. S. Freeman, R. D. Gilbert, P. L. Grady, S. P. Hersh, P. R. Lord, 
R. McGregor, M. H. Mohamed, M. H. Theil, C. Tomasino, P. A. Tucker; Adjunct 
Professors: J . E. Hendrix, T. lijima, H. F. Mark, J. Preston, L. Roldan; Profes- 
sors Emeriti: J. F. Bogdan, K. S. Campbell, D. M. Gates, P. D. Emerson, T. W. 
George, D. S. Hamby, J. A. Porter Jr, H. A. Rutherford, W. K. Walsh, W. M. 
Whaley, R. W. Work; Associate Professor: C. B. Smith; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: L. D. Claxton, P. E. Sasser; Associate Professors Emeriti: T. H. 
Guion, A. C. Hayes, T. G. Rochow; Assistant Professors: P. Banks-Lee, T. G. 
Clapp, H. Hamouda, S. M. Hudson, J. W. Rucker, G. W. Smith; Visiting 
Assistant Professor: T. K. Ghosh 



308 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: S. K. Batra, R. E. Fornes 

The Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry and Science offers the 
degree of Master of Science in textile chemistry, the degree of Master of Science 
in textiles with specialization in textile engineering and science, and the profes- 
sional degree of Master of Textiles in both programs. The department embraces a 
number of disciplines including synthesis of polymers, formation of fibers, 
manufacturing of yarns and woven, knitted and nonwoven fabrics, and dyeing 
and finishing. The departmental offerings, in addition to including these techno- 
logical areas, cover such scientific aspects as the characterization of the chemi- 
cal, physical and mechanical properties of the materials and their structure, the 
underlying principles governing their properties, the structure-property rela- 
tionships, the environmental effects, and the material-machine interactions. 
Students receive a fundamental knowledge of the principles that relate to this 
highly diversified and derivative field and an opportunity to conduct research in 
an area supporting it. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

TC 407 Wet Processing and Quality Control. Preqs.: T 250, TC 310, TC 320. 3(1-6) S. 

TC 412 Textile Chemical Analysis IL Preq.: T 203. 3(2-3) S. 

TC 415 Principles and Practice of Textile Printing. Preqs.: T301 or TC 320 or PD(TX) 
272. 3(2-2) F. 

TC 441 Theory of Physico-Chemical Processes in Textiles L Preqs.: C in MA 231 or 
241; C in PY 205 or 211. 3(3-0) F. 

TC 442 Theory of Physico-Chemical Processes in Textiles II. Preq.: TC Ul. 3(3-0) S. 

TC 451 Computers in Textile Wet Processing. Preqs.: MA 212, PY212, T301. 3(3-0) S. 

TC (CH) 461 Introduction to Fiber-Forming Polymers. Preq.: CH 223. U(3-3) F. 

TC 490 Special Topics in Textile Chemistry. 1-6 F,S. 

TC 49 1 Seminar in Textile Chemistry. Preqs.: TC 320, TC 330 and sr. standing. 1(0-2) S. 

TT 405 Contemporary Nonwoven Textiles. Preqs.: TES305; sr. standing and CI. 3(3-0) 
S. 

TT 420 Modern Developments in Yarn Manufacturing. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

TT 425 Textured Yam Production and Properties. Preqs.: T211, T220, PY211 (205); 
Coreq.: PY 212 (208). 3(2-2) F. 

TT 443 Advanced Knitting Systems and Fabrics. Preq.: TT 341. 3(2-2) F. 

TT 450 Advanced Weaving. Preq.: TES (TMT) 351. 3(2-2) F. Alt. yrs. 

TT 451 Advanced Woven Fabric Design. Preq.: TES (TMT) 370. 3(2-2) S. Alt. yrs. 

TS 460 Physical Properties of Textile Fibers. Preqs.: MA 212, PY 212. 3(3-0) F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 309 

TS461 Mechanical Properties of Fibrous Structures. Preg-s-.-ikfA^Oi, TESA60. 3(3-0) 
S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

TC 504 Fiber Formation— Theory and Practice. Preqs. :MA301,PY 208 or CI. 3(3-0) 
F. Practical and theoretical analysis of the chemical and physical principles underlying the 
conventional methods of converting bulk polymer to fiber; rheology; melt, dry and wet 
polymer extrusion; fiber drawing; heat setting; general theory applied to unit processes. 

Cuculo 

TC 505 Theory of Dyeing. Preq.: CHU33 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Mechanisms of dyeing. Applica- 
tion of thermodynamics to dyeing systems. Kinetics of diffusion in dyeing processes. 

McGregor 

TC 506 Color Science. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing in TC; Coreq.: TC 507. 3(3-0) F. Basis 
of modern techniques for color specification, measurement, control and communication. 
Applicationsof color science to textiles, plastics, color reproduction, computer-based imag- 
ing and display systems. Basic concepts taught by computer color graphics. McGregor 

TC 507 Color Laboratory. Preq.: Sr. or grad. student in textile chemistry; Coreq.: TC 506. 
1(0-2) F. Exercises with modern methods and equipment to aid in understanding color 
perception, color science and color measurement. Computer color graphics exercises for 
comprehension of basic concepts. Independent projects in color science. Limited enroll- 
ment. Graduate Staff 

TC 520 Chemistry of Dyes and Color. Preqs.: CH 221 and CH 223. 3(3-0) S. Correlation 
of color and chemical constitution, synthetic routes for popular dyes of all important types; 
electronic mechanisms for reactive dyes; chemistry of dye interactions with light, washing 
and other in-use influences; economic and environmental considerations. Freeman 

TC 521 Dye Synthesis Laboratory. Preq.: TC 520. 3(0-9) F. Laboratory work in the 
preparation and analysis of synthetic dyes of a large number of types. Personal instruction 
in techniques and processes for preparation and purification of intermediates and dyes. 

Freeman 

TC 530 The Chemistry of Textile Auxiliaries. Preq.: One yr. of organic chemistry. 3(3-0) 
F. Industrially important textile chemicals used for enhancing fiber and fabric properties 
such as durable press, water repellency, antisoiling, flame retardancy, softness, stiffness, 
lubricity and other uses will be studied. Correlation of effect with structure, end-use 
influences, interaction with fabric and fibers, sources and synthetic routes, economic and 
environmental considerations will be covered. Tomasino 

TC (MAT) 561 Organic Chemistry of Polymers. Preqs.: TClfdland CH231 or CHJt31. 
3(3-0) S. Principles of step reaction and addition polymerizations; copolymerization; emul- 
sion polymerization; ionic polymerization; characterization of polymers; molecular struc- 
ture and properties. Gilbert, Theil 

TC (CH, MAT) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Bulk Properties. Preqs.: 
CH 220 or CH 203, CH 431. 3(3-0) F. Alt. t/rs. Molecular weight description; states of 
aggregation and their interconversion; rubbery, glassy and crystalline states; rubber 
elasticity; diffusion properties. Gates 

TC 565 Polymer Applications and Technology. Preqs.: One yr. of organic chemistry; TC 
U61. 3(3-0) S. Poly(olefins), poly(vinyl chloride), poly(vinyl acetate), poly(urethanes), epox- 
ies, silicones, styrene copolymers used as textile finishes, nonwoven binders, fabric coat- 
ings, composites, adhesives, foams, carpet backing adhesives. Synthesis, industrial pro- 
cesses, properties and products are emphasized. Graduate Staff 



310 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

TC (CHE) 569 Polymers, Surf actants and Colloidal Materials. 3(3-0) F. (See chemical 
engineering.) 

TC (CHE) 570 Radiation Chemistry and Technology of Polymeric Systems. 3(3-0) S. 
(See chemical engineering.) 

TC 591 Special Topics in Textile Science. Preqs.:Sr. orgrad. standing and CI. 1-U F,S. 
Intensive treatments of selected topics in textile, polymer and fiber science. 

Graduate Staff 

TES 500 Fiber and Polymer Microscopy. Preqs.: MA 212, PY212, T203. 3(1-U) F. The 
art and science of light and electron microscopy; theoretical and practical aspects of 
visibility, resolution and contrast. Laboratory practice in assembling, testing and using 
various microscopes and accessories in analyzing, describing and identifying unoriented 
and oriented crystalline or amorphous materials. Laboratory emphasis on the study of 
fibers and polymers through transmission microscopy with polarized light. Tucker 

TES 505 Textile Instrumentation and Control Systems. Preqs.: MA 301, PY212 and 
one course in computer science. 3(3-0) F. The theory and application of instruments and 
control systems used in modern textile plants. Basic instruments and computer systems are 
described along with their use in process control, production control, research and 
development. Grady 

TES 520 Yarn Processing Dynamics. Preqs.: MA 301 and CI orgrad. standing. 3(2-2) F. 
Theoretical analysis of the dynamics and machine-fiber interactions of such functions as 
opening, cleaning, carding actions, fiber attenuation, ring spinning, open-end spinning, 
texturing and winding. The role of fiber placement, cohesion and lubrication on yarn 
processing and properties. Laboratory experiments designed to verify the analysis dis- 
cussed in the lectures. El-Shiekh 

TES 541 Theory and Practice of Knitted Fabric Production and Control. Preqs.: TT 
370 and CI. 3(3-0) F. The technology and control systems for manufacturing simple and 
complex knitted fabrics; control and monitoring of yarn feeding systems; influence of yarn, 
machine, finishing and fabric structure on the fabric aesthetics, physical and mechanical 
properties; optimization of fabric properties and machine productivity, including costing; 
problems of jacquard fabric processing and control. Graduate Staff 

TES 549 Warp Knit Engineering and Structural Design. Preq.: TT U3. 3(3-0) S. 
Engineering analysis of tricot and raschel machinery. Design of yarn let-off and fabric 
take-up mechanisms. Studies of fabric production techniques and quality control systems. 
Theory of production optimization and the properties of fabrics. Complex geometrical loop 
models and their application. Graduate Staff 

TES 555 Production Mechanics and Properties of Woven Fabrics. Preqs.: MA 301 
AND CI or grad. standing. 3(2-2). S. The interrelations between the mechanics of produc- 
tion and mechanical properties of woven fabrics; unit operations required to prepare yarns 
for weaving and the mechanisms employed in weaving; fabric structure, geometry and 
mechanical properties; designing for specific fabric properties. Mohamed 

TES 561 Mechanical and Rheological Properties of Fibrous Material. Preq.: MA 301. 
3(2-2) S. In-depth study of the stress-strain, bending, torsional, dynamic and rheological 
behavior of natural and man-made fibers. Theoretical relations and advanced techniques 
are presented and discussed. Gupta, Hersh 

TES (TMT) 562 Physical Properties of Fiber Forming Polymers, Fibers and 
Fibrous Structures. Preqs.: MA 301, PY208. 3(3-0) F. Experimental results and theoreti- 
cal considerations of the physical properties of fibers and fiber forming polymers discussed. 
This will include electrical, thermal, optical, frictional and moisture properties of these 
materials. The influence of chemical and molecular fine structure on these properties 
discussed. Buchanan, Gupta 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 311 

TES (MAT) 563 Characterization of Structure of Fiber Forming Polymers. Preqs.: 
MA 301, PY208. 3(3-0) F. Theories, experimental evidence and characterization methods 
of the molecular fine structure of fiber forming polymers in the solid state discussed. 
Characterization methods include X-ray diffraction, microscopy, infrared, thermal and 
magnetic resonance. An introduction to nucleation theory of polymer systems presented. 

Buchanan, Gupta 

TES 589 Special Studies in Textile Engineering and Science. Preq.: Sr. or grad. 
standing. l-U F,S. New or special course on developments in textile engineering and 
science. Specific topics and prerequisites identified vary. Generally used for first offering 
of a new course. Graduate Staff 

TES 590 Special Projects in Textile Engineering and Science. Preqs.: Sr. standing or 
grad. standing, CI. 2-3 F,S,Sum. Advanced studies will include current problems of the 
industry, independent investigations, seminars and technical presentations, both oral and 
written. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

TC (CH, MAT) 662 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Solution Properties. 

Preqs.: CH 433, TC (CH, MAT) 562. 3(3-0) S. Alt. yrs. Thermodynamics of polymer solu- 
tions; phase equilibria; methods determining of molecular weight. Theil 

TC (CHE) 669 Diffusion in Polymers. 2(2-0) S. (See chemical engineering.) 

TC (CHE) 671 Special Topics in Polymer Science. 1-3 F. (See chemical engineering.) 

TC (TES) 691 Special Topics in Fiber Science. 1-3 S. (See textile engineering and 
science/textile management and technology.) 

TC 698 Seminar for Textile Chemistry. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of scientific articles and 
presentations; review and discussion of student papers and research problems. 

Graduate Staff 

TC 699 Textile Research for Textile Chemistry. Credits Arranged. Individual re- 
search in the field of textile chemistry. Graduate Staff 

TES 603 Group Research in Textiles. Preqs.: TES 520 and TES 555 or TES (TMT) 5Jtl. 
3(2-3) F. Group research under supervision in which each student will execute a portion of 
the research and will report to the whole group. Each student required to write a report on 
the whole project. Formal lectures on methodology, interpretation and application of 
research. Lord 

TES 631 Synthetic Fibers. Preq.: TT U25 or equivalent. 2(1-2) F,S,Sum. Lectures and 
projects on advanced problems associated with the properties and processing of man-made 
continuous filament and staple fiber yarns. Hersh 

TES 640 Physical and Mechanical Properties of Knitted Fabric. Preq.: TES 5^1. 
3(3-0) Alt. S. Seminar discussions of research literature on studies of the physical and 
mechanical properties of knitted fabrics. Graduate Staff 

TES 651, 652 Fabric Development and Construction. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(1-Jt) 
F,S. Application of advanced technology to the development and construction of woven 
fabrics. Graduate Staff 

TES 663 Mechanics of Twisted Structures. Preq.: TES 561 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Odd 
yrs. Study of the basic mechanics of fibrous assemblies. Geometry and mechanics of twisted 
structures (yarns, cords, braids, etc.) and the translation of fiber properties into structural 
behavior. Batra, El-Shiekh 



312 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

TES 664 Mechanics of Fabric Structures. Preq.: TES 561 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Even 
j/rs. Analysis of the geometry and behavior of woven, knitted and nonwoven fabrics under 
various stress conditions and end use applications. Batra, El-Shiekh 

TES (TC) 691 Special Topics in Fiber Science. Preq.: CI. 1-3 S. The study of selected 
topics of particular interest in various advanced phases of fiber science. Graduate Staff 

TES 697 Independent Study in Textiles. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Problems of specific interest 
in textiles assigned for study and investigation. The preparation of a report for publication 
required. Three hours maximum credit allowed toward Master of Textiles degree. No 
credit allowed toward Master of Science in Textiles degree. Graduate Staff 

TES 698 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of scientific articles of interest to the textile 
industry; review and discussion of student papers and research problems. Graduate Staff 

TES 699 Textile Thesis or Dissertation Research. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Prob- 
lems of specific interest to the textile industry assigned for study and investigation. The use 
of experimental methods emphasized. Attention given to the preparation of reports for 
publication. The master's thesis may be based upon the data obtained. Graduate Staff 

Textile and Apparel Management 

Professor G. A. Berkstresser III, Head 

Professor S. K. Batra, Associate Head 

Professor: R. A. Barnhardt; Professors Emeriti: A. B. Moss, W. C. Stuckey; 
Associate Professors: R. A. Donaldson, P. B. Hudson, T. J. Little, M. A. Robin- 
son Jr.; Visiting Associate Professors: N. A. Hunter, E. M. McPherson; Adjunct 
Associate Professor: D. M. Powell; Assistant Professor: A. C. Clapp 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

TAM 530 Textile Quality Control. Preq.: TAM 330 OR CI. 3(3-0) S. Quality control 
systems for textile operations with emphasis on sampling plans for attributes and variables 
and on interpretation of data as related to identifying sources of product variability. 

Graduate Staff 

TAM (EB) 585 Market Research in Textiles. Preq.: TAM (EB) i82. 3(3-0) S. A study 
and analysis of the quantitative methods employed in market research in the textile 
industry. The function of market research and its proper orientation to management and 
decision making. Berkstresser 

TAM 589 Special Studies in Textile Management and Technology. Preq.: Sr. orgrad. 
standing. 1-Jt F,S. New or special course on developments in textile management and 
technology. Specific topics and prerequisites vary. Graduate Staff 

TAM 590 Special Projects in Textile Management and Technology .Preg^s.. Sr. stand- 
ing or grad. standing, CI. 2-3 F,S,Sum. Advanced studies on current problems of the 
industry, independent investigations, seminars and technical presentations, both oral and 
written. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

TAM 62 1 Advanced Textile Testing. Preqs.: TAM 530; ST ^21 or CI. 3(2-2) S. Design of 
textile laboratories required for specific needs; experimental design and performance of 
tests; analysis of data relating to industrial problems; specialized physical tests; interlabor- 
atory correlations; development of standardized test methods. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 313 

TAM 680 Special Projects in Textile Management. Preq.: TAM (EB) 585. 1-3 
F,S,Sum. Special studies in textile management covering current problems of the industry, 
independent investigations, seminars and technical presentations, both oral and written. 

Graduate Staff 

TAM 686 Advanced Textile Labor Management Seminar. Preq.: TAM U87 or CI. 

3(3-0) F,S. A study of advanced labor management problems in the textile industry, with 
particular emphasis directed toward the application of the Occupational Safety and Health 
Act. Powell 

TAM 687 Competitive Strategy and Planning for the Textile Firm. Preq.: Comple- 
tion oflShrs. in a graduate degree program, of which at least 6 hrs. must be in economics and 
related courses at the 500 level or higher. 3(3-0). F. Elements of competitive strategy and 
planning methods within the textile complex with emphasis on the concepts of strategy in a 
mature industry, defining business in a global industry, resource allocation through stra- 
tegic planning methods and implementing strategy in single business and multi-business 
firms. Hunter 

TAM 697 Independent Study in Textiles. 3(3-0) F,S, Sum. Problems of specific interest 
in textiles will be assigned for study and investigation. The preparation of a report for 
publication will be required. Three hours maximum credit will be allowed toward Master 
of Textiles degree. No credit is allowed toward Master of Science in Textiles degree. 

Graduate Staff 

TAM 698 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of scientific articles of interest to the textile 
industry; review and discussion of student papers and research problems. 

Graduate Staff 

TAM 699 Textile Thesis or Dissertation Research. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. Prob- 
lems of specific interest to the textile industry assigned for study and investigation. The use 
of experimental methods emphasized. Attention given to the preparation of reports for 
publication. The master's thesis may be based upon the data obtained. Graduate Staff 

Toxicology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E. Hodgson, Head 

Assistant Professor R. C. Smart, (yraduate Administrator 

Professors: W. C. Dauterman, T. J. Sheets; Adjunct Professors: J. R. Fouts, J. A. 
Goldstein, R. M.